64,836 results for 2000

  • Using DGHostTM To Determine the Hosting Capacities of Low Voltage Networks

    McNab SJ; Lemon S; Crownshaw T; Strahan R; Le Quellec I; Miller A (2017)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Eradication of invasive predators on seabird islands

    Dunlevy, PA; Ebbert, SM; Russell, James; Towns, DR (2011-09-08)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Direct impacts of seabird predators on island biota other than seabirds

    Drake, DR; Bodey, T; Russell, James; Towns, DR; Nogales, M; Ruffino, L (2011-09-08)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Impacts of introduced predators on seabirds

    Towns, DR; Byrd, GV; Jones, HP; Rauzon, MJ; Russell, James; Wilcox, C (2011-09-08)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Design foundations: Towards a model of style grammar in creative drawing

    Sweo, Jennie (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    A style grammar is a principled rule set that governs the organization of very complex ideas. It allows for the examination of underlying structures which are often times obscured. Style grammars have been developed for many fields such as writing, fashion and architecture but to date there is no style grammar for creative drawing. The research identifies the necessary visual features and core traits associated with each feature towards developing such a model for creative drawings. Then operational measures are defined using the computer to extract and measure the core traits of those features towards developing a model of style grammar in drawing. These visual features include line, tone, and depth. Core traits include line length, line width, line expressiveness, local tone, global tone, texture, pattern, outline, shape, and position. A multidimensional scaling (MDS) using input from 27 subjects, 10 art experts and 17 novices, supported the overall list of visual features and added the dimension of smudge to the list. A second MDS sort discusses issues with images and large art categorical sorts from the standpoint of both human perception and machine measures that were obtained using feature extraction. It was concluded from the results of the second MDS that large art categories were too broad to be useful in evaluating measures to develop the model. Further analysis was run using only drawings from three artists, two impressionists to compare similarity and one expressionist for dissimilarity to determine if the machine measures of the core traits of the visual features were able to differentiate smaller groupings of consistent drawing styles. Using the computer allowed for systematic and objective procedures to be used to obtain measures. The multinomial logistic regression showed high significance for all the traits except marginal significance for line length and no significance for depth. Binomial logistic regressions run on each pair of artists showed high significance for all the traits except depth. The combined positive results of the first MDS card sort and the binomial and multinomial regression analysis provide proof of concept and offer strong support towards the development of a model of style grammar for creative drawings. Implications for teaching drawing using the identified visual features and core traits are offered. The outcomes and analysis provided in this research currently support a general practice rule in design reuse and intelligent borrowing that suggests first smudge, then depth, then tone, and then line quality are the most significant elements to use for style comparison. Discussions for future research including improved measures and other types of perception testing are provided towards further development of the model.

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  • Talanoa ile i'a : talking to Pacific Island young people in West Auckland about health : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Social Work at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

    Faleolo, Moses Ma'alo (2003)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The present study explores the health issues surrounding Pacific Island youth health development. The present study conducted a literature review on youth health issues in New Zealand and found that most are cultural and social related. A second literature review of theoretical dispositions to account for the emergence of youth heath issues found that Pacific Island concepts, medical sociology theory and youth health theory were relevant explanations for the emergence of Pacific Island youth health issues. The present study conducted focus groups with Pacific Island young people about youth health issues to see if the information from the literature review corresponded with the participants’ responses and whether the theoretical explanations were consistent with the participants’ responses. The present study found that a correlation exists between the literature review and the participants’ responses. The present study maintains through the participants’ responses that the key to addressing Pacific Island young people health issues is to involve their families throughout the process of assessment and in the development of response plans. This means the perspectives of those in youth health policy arenas, the perspective of service managers and the perspective of professionals are required to recognise that the perspective of the young person is an essential domain for understanding the cause of and for resolving Pacific Island youth health issues. ‘Talanoa ile I’a’ is the story of Pacific Island young people living in West Auckland. It is based on responses to questions posed to participants of the study in relation to Pacific Island youth health development issues. The present study contends that in order to understand, identify and resolve Pacific Island youth health issues it is important to talk to Pacific Island young people themselves. The present study did not conduct any research with youth policymakers, youth health services or health professionals but preferred to explore youth health with Pacific Island young people themselves. The present study is built on the participants’ responses and provides both warning signs and building blocks for youth health policy, youth healthcare services and youth health professionals. The present study is a Pacific Island approach to Pacific Island youth health issues; it is ‘by Pacific for Pacific’.

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  • Anthropogenic Influences on the Sedimentary Evolution of the Coromandel Harbour

    Harpur, Alexander (2016)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The Coromandel Harbour is located on the eastern side of the Coromandel Peninsula, North Island, New Zealand. To date, sedimentological research conducted in the harbour has been confined to nearshore areas, with limited data existing for the subtidal regions of the harbour. The primary aim of this thesis is to identify whether and how various human activities in the catchment have altered harbour-wide, intertidal and subtidal, sedimentation rates and sediment geochemistry. A secondary aim is to identify the sedimentary evolution of the whole Coromandel Harbour over broad time scales (i.e. thousands of years). Sedimentological data has been collected from 17 intertidal and subtidal sediment cores. Cores have been analysed for down-core changes in sediment texture, mineralogy, observational characteristics and geochemistry measured through portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF). A facies model constructed from this data has been used to interpret the sedimentary development of the harbour. Pre-human and anthropogenic sediment accumulation rates (SARs) have been estimated using radiocarbon dating, qualitative pollen analysis and facies analysis. Anthropogenic heavy metals have been interpreted against pre-human baselines to identify influences on natural contaminant levels, with specific values compared with regional contaminant guidelines to assess ecological threats. Deeply weathered soils developed in a subaerial environment somewhere between the last interglacial at c.120 ka and the extended last glacial maximum (eLGM) at 29 ka. These soils were overtopped by streambank and floodplain deposits at the eLGM to the onset of the mid-Holocene sea level rise at c.7500 cal yr B.P. As sea level rose, inundated eLGM and early estuarine sediments were initially pyritised in a stratified, restricted marine setting. Over time, sea level rose and the stratification of the harbour was destroyed, ceasing pyritisation. Streams began to rapidly aggrade at the harbour with the positive change in base level, giving early estuarine (c.7500-5000 cal yr B.P) subtidal SARs of ~0.31-0.45 mm/yr. As streams reached stable profiles, SARs decreased to generally conformable rates of 0.25-0.47 mm/yr in the intertidal regions and ~0.1-0.25 mm/yr in the subtidal regions during the pre-Polynesian phase (c.7500-700 cal yr B.P). Polynesian SARs (700-130 cal yr B.P) decreased to ~0.05-0.13 mm/yr. Whole European (1820 A.D-present) SARs in the northern parts of the harbour are ~0.52-0.77 mm/yr and appear to be chiefly related to mining and deforestation. Recent European (1975 A.D-present) SARs are ~3.52-10.37 mm/yr in the southern parts of the harbour and are chiefly related to pine plantation erosion. A secondary depocentre for pine plantation sediments appears to be at the inlet where rates of ~4.98 mm/yr occur. Only arsenic and mercury exist over Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council (ANZECC) Interim Sediment Quality Guidelines (ISQG) Low concentrations in anthropogenic sediments analysed. Maximum harbour-wide arsenic concentrations of up to 33.5 mg/kg that exceed the ISQG-Low value of 20 mg/kg are associated with mining related sediments near the Whangarahi Stream mouth. Maximum arsenic concentrations in pine plantation sediments is 22.3 mg/kg. Mercury may also exceed ISQG-Low/High values throughout all harbour sediments, though it is unclear whether mercury has been incorrectly measured by pXRF.

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  • Characterisation of dairy strains of Geobacillus stearothermophilus and a genomics insight into its growth and survival during dairy manufacture : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Microbiology at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Burgess, Sara (2016)

    Doctoral thesis
    Massey University

    The thermophilic bacilli, such as G. stearothermophilus, are an important group of contaminants in the dairy industry. Although these bacilli are generally not pathogenic, their presence in dairy products is an indicator of poor hygiene and high numbers are unacceptable to customers. In addition, their growth may result in milk product defects caused by the production of acids or enzymes, potentially leding to off-flavours. These bacteria are able to grow in sections of dairy manufacturing plants where temperatures reach 40 – 65 °C. Furthermore, because they are spore formers, they are difficult to eliminate. In addition, they exhibit a fast growth rate and tend to readily form biofilms. Many strategies have been tested to prevent the formation of thermophilic bacilli biofilms in dairy manufacture, but with limited success. This is, in part, because little is known about the diversity of strains found in dairy manufacture, the structure of thermophilic bacilli biofilms and how these bacteria have adapted to grow in a dairy environment. In Chapters 2 and 3, phenotypic approaches were taken to understand the diversity of strains within a manufacturing plant. Specifically in Chapter 2, strains of the most dominant thermphilic bacilli, G. stearothermophilus, were isolated from the surface of various locations within the evaporator section and ten strains were evaluated for different phenotypic characteristics. Biochemical profiling, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and fatty profiling demonstrated that the population was diverse. In Chapter 3, it was shown that the same ten strains varied in their ability to form biofilms and produce spores. Three strains of G. stearothermophilus, A1, P3 and D1, were selected for further analysis. SEM demonstrated that there were differences in biofilm morphologies between the three strains, particularly D1 versus the other two strains, A1 and P3. In Chapters 4, 5 and 6 a comparative genomics approach was taken to determine how these bacteria are able to grow and survive within a dairy manufacturing environment, as well as how they differ from other strains of Geobacillus. In Chapter 4 draft genome sequences were generated for three strains of G.stearothermophilus. Identification of a putative lactose operon in the three dairy strains provided evidence of dairy adaptation. In Chapter 5 a phylogenomics approach was taken to resolve relationships within the Geobacillus genus and to identify differences within the G. stearothermophilus group itself. Finally in Chapter 6 comparison with the model organism B. subtilis, gave a genomics insight into the potential mechanisms of sporulation for Geobacillus spp.

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  • Exploring the development potential of Saudi Arabian Airlines, the national flag carrier of Saudi Arabia : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Aviation at Massey University, (Manawatu), New Zealand

    Gamraoyi, Khaled (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis will examine the possible factors that could greatly influence the future development of the legacy carrier of Saudi Arabia: Saudi Arabian Airlines. Furthermore, this thesis delved into the feasibility of a new route from Jeddah to Auckland and how this route could impact the growth of Saudi Arabian Airlines. The research questions were answered through the use of a mixed method approach. The research was carried out in two phases. The first phase involved environmental scanning through the process of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis, where the strengths and weaknesses of the internal environment of Saudi Arabian Airlines were appraised. It also examined the possible opportunities and threats of the external environment (i.e. the Middle East region), where Saudi Arabian Airlines is situated. The second phase involved a survey where the feasibility of a new route (i.e. Jeddah–Bali–Auckland) was examined and evaluated. The results suggested that the exponential growth of the aviation industry in the Middle East can be capitalized by Saudi Arabian Airlines by using its recognized strengths and addressing the concerns that have emerged in this study. A possible strategy by which these concerns can be addressed is through establishing a new route that Saudi Arabian Airlines can take advantage of in the future to fulfil its ambitions of becoming one of the top airlines in the aviation industry. One specific route that the thesis examines is the Jeddah–Bali–Auckland route, where there is a substantial market which will yield an increased profit margin and therefore impact the growth of Saudi Arabian Airlines.

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  • The recovery experiences of refugees from Middle Eastern backgrounds with concussions : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Psychology at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

    Zaytoun, Ruba (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    With the growing number of Middle Eastern refugees in the world, there is a need for more culturally and refugee specific research to examine the ongoing and idiosyncratic nature of the stress and trauma refugees’ experience. As a result of the arduous journeys refugees undergo, they become susceptible to a number of mental and physical illnesses, including Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) such as concussions. Little research so far has been dedicated to understanding Middle Eastern refugees’ experiences of TBI and how understandings of this injury can impact on their journeys to recovery. In this small Australian, community-based, qualitative study six individuals from Middle Eastern refugee backgrounds, who have experienced a concussion in the past five years were interviewed. Participants included two females and four males, aged from mid 20s to early 60s. The interviews focused on participants’ conceptualisation of concussions and their experience of recovery. Interview data was investigated through the Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) lens. Six main themes emerged from interview data, these related to: Coping, consequences of injury, professional relationships, conception of brain and brain injuries, refugee related experiences, and experiences of concussion. All participants stressed the importance of family as a source of support in coping with consequences of injury. Faith in a higher power was highlighted as a core value in Arabic Middle Eastern cultures, common in most interviewee accounts. One source of distress in some participants was the worry that others will perceive them as having mental illness as a consequence of their concussion. Future research is encouraged to examine the stigma underlying mental illness in the Middle East, and the obstacles preventing people with similar backgrounds from seeking help.

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  • Recording and Tracking Design Decisions in Interactive System Development

    Yang, Wanying (2016)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Experience economy is prompting the innovation of traditional product design. The design concept - "user-centered design" has received wide recognition. In the face of many professional or non-professional users, the priority of interaction design is to ensure the usability of the interactive product, and then a good user experience of the product. The user interface is an intermediary between human and computer. Users exchange information with the computer via the user interface. The user interface is an important part of a computer system. It is a big part of the software development. The quality of the user interface directly affects the performance of the software. For most users, the user interface is all they know from a product. So for these users, a program with a good interior design but a bad user interface design is a bad program. In this project we investigate different ways of recording design decisions in interactive system development which may allow us to think of the different variants and alternatives that are possible (within a design space) in some formal notation, which then allows us to either reason about their suitability or record the decisions made to understand the impact of decisions and how well they support the given criteria. The goal of this project will involve finding out what the influences are which help drive the design process; considering the effects of individual vs. team design; deciding how and when decisions occur; thinking about useful ways to record decisions and their influences; and investigating the usefulness of the approach through the working examples identified as case studies

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  • Inhibitors to the Organisational Adoption of Gamification

    Jefferies, Dannette Louise (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    This study looks at how organisations can use technology to engage, motivate, and reward staff by embedding game-like elements into business applications and processes through a phenomenon called gamification. Gamification is an emerging phenomenon that has the potential to increase engagement, productivity and performance in organisations. It is the convergence of motivation theory, information systems, and the rise of digital communications systems. Gamification has been trending academically since 2010, and appears to support the human drivers of motivation and engagement through the appeal of both intrinsic and extrinsic rewards. Yet, while gamification appears to be a solution to the issues surrounding employee motivation, there is little documented evidence of successful enterprise integrations. Gamification may be the modern elixir to all that ails organisations as they struggle to attract, nurture and retain talented employees. However, if this is the case, then why are gamified practises not widely adopted by companies? Twelve participants were interviewed for this qualitative study. The first three participants work in software organisations that have first-hand experience with gamified product and process development. Next, a further nine participants were interviewed, three in the broadly-defined communications industry, three in finance, and one each in real estate, retail sales, and manufacturing. These participants were selected as potential users of gamification within an organisational context. The grounded theory methodology is used to explore the inhibitors to gamification techniques in organisations. Data collection strategies included in-depth interviews and grounded theory methodology techniques are used for data analysis. This study found the adoption of gamification in organisations is largely inhibited by the infancy of the gamification industry as the availability of gamified platforms, and the demand from organisations is relatively low. It is expected that gamification will become more mainstream in the future as an applied business practice. Voluntariness is a critical factor within any managerial initiatives aimed at cultivating positive employee attitudes and experiences at work. The concept of employee consent includes mandatory fun events such as companywide social events as well as gamification systems. The original contributions to knowledge of this thesis include two conceptual models. The first draws on an existing model for game design and proposes that employee engagement is an emergent property of an open gamification system. Emerging from the combination of mechanics and dynamics creating an aesthetic experience that meets the motivational needs of employees and thereby evokes an emotional commitment to the organisation and furthermore, it motivates employees to focus on shared organisational and individuals’ goals. The second conceptual model draws on Hofstede’s organisational culture dimensions framework and posits that there may be a specific cultural pattern for organisations best suited for effective gamification. This study finds organisations with cultures that are goal-oriented; externally driven; easy-going work discipline; local; open systems; and have an employee orientation, are more likely to find gamification is an appropriate fit for their organisation. In addition, this thesis distinguishes between gamification and organisational gamification and offers a unique definition for gamification implemented within organisations, which has been purposefully and strategically implemented.

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  • Volcanology of the basaltic lava succession within the Auckland pit of the Bombay Quarry, Bombay Volcanic Complex, South Auckland Volcanic Field

    Kapasi, Aliasgar (2016)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The South Auckland Volcanic Field (SAVF), which was active 1.59 – 0.51 million years ago and comprises around 82 volcanic centres, represents a complete history of a monogenetic field preserved in the geological record. The Auckland pit in the Bombay Quarry was recently exposed, revealing an infilled palaeovalley of volcanic and sedimentary deposits possibly associated with the nearby Bombay Volcanic Complex. A set of vertical drill cores from across the quarry were available for this study. The stratigraphy of the volcanic and sedimentary deposits and the facies architecture were examined and described from the drill cores available, and a set of stratigraphic logs were produced. Volcanic and sedimentary units identified were: basement Waitemata and Tauranga group sediments, three individual ponded basalt lavas with intercalated scoria and Quaternary alluvium and/or Kauroa ash deposits. Facies identified include: moderately vesicular basalt (A.1), vesicular basalt with vesicle trails (A.2), non-vesicular basalt (A.3), poorly vesicular basalt (A.4), scoria deposit (B), scoriaceous basalt (C) and intercalated silt/clay (D). Petrographic characteristics were analysed by optical microscopy, which show that all three basalt lavas have minerals comprising: olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts, and a groundmass of plagioclase, opaques and mafic minerals, however, the proportions of each mineral vary between samples. Olivine, clinopyroxene and plagioclase elemental compositions for each of the three basalt units were determined by electron microprobe analysis and revealed that the middle basalt had relatively lower proportion of Mg- and Ca-rich minerals compared to the upper and lower basalts. Furthermore, mineral compositions were consistent with the broad group B rock type of the SAVF lavas. Bulk-rock geochemical characteristics were analysed by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry where the basalt samples were classified as basanites and ne-hawaiites. The lower and upper basalts have a relatively wide range of major and trace element compositions; whereas, the middle basalt has less variation. The three basalt lava flows represent pahoehoe and/or transitional lava flows, which occurred during magmatic eruptions separated by periods of volcanic quiescence represented by Quaternary alluvium and/or Kauroa ash deposits. The magma source beneath the Bombay area reveals that it consists of dominantly a garnet-bearing peridotite source where only group B type lavas were erupted over time. This process indicates a polygenetic-like eruption history within a monogenetic field, which may be an ideal analogue for understanding the future of shield volcanism in the South Auckland and Auckland Volcanic Field.

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  • Foreign Affairs in a Native Context: The Significance of Foreign Relations on Thomas Jefferson's Native American Views

    Berry, Shane (2016)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    There has been considerable research into Native American history in recent times, with much analysis of what transpired in the early years of the United States, and how events from the late 18th and early 19th centuries have impacted on the Native Americans. As a prominent figure, Thomas Jefferson made decisions that undoubtedly affected the Native tribes, yet his Native American ideas have not received as much attention from scholars as his thinking about most other topics. Most literature that has been produced which relates to Jefferson’s attitudes about Native Americans, has not considered adequately the importance that foreign relations played in shaping his thinking. The purpose of this study is to examine the significance of foreign affairs on Jefferson’s views about Native Americans, and to determine whether foreign affairs was a critical factor in influencing his plans for the Native Americans. To ascertain the importance of foreign relations in shaping Jefferson’s thinking about the Native Americans, an exploration of his writing was conducted, in which all documents that fell within the scope of this research project were analysed, and all relevant material used in this thesis. The documents used for this study were found online in the Jefferson Papers at the United States National Archives. Findings from this study clearly show that foreign relations had a major impact on Jefferson’s thinking about the Native Americans. The two predominant themes that emerged from his writing were conflict and land; foreign affairs primarily influenced Jefferson’s views in relation to these topics. Because of the prominence of these themes, they were chosen as the focus of the two chapters for this thesis. Within the themes of conflict and land, the affect that foreign relations had on Jefferson’s thinking is evident on a number of issues. He believed that most of the conflict with the Native Americans occurred because of the interference of foreign agents. The impact of foreign affairs can be seen in Jefferson’s views about trade with the Native Americans, and his thoughts on agriculture were clearly shaped by concerns about other nations. The influence of foreign relations is unmistakeable in Jefferson’s thoughts about national security, and its effect can also be seen in the development of his ideas about Native American removal. Findings from this thesis add depth to an important factor that shaped Jefferson’s thinking, and help in gaining an understanding of his decision making regarding the Native American.

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  • Digital reading: From the reflective self to social machine

    Peters, Michael A.; Jandric, Petar (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Using the form of dialogue, this paper analyzes reading in the digital age. The paper reveals the history of reading from Augustine to Wittgenstein as a changing and evolving set of practices such as the cultural invention of silent reading, mass reading, and rise of specialized reading publics. It analyzes various 153  changes to these practices in the age of digital technologies, and links digital reading practices to the bundle of related practices such as writing, viewing, listening, and surfing the Web. The paper shows that digital reading is a fundamental question in education at all levels. Situated within radical concordance of various media, digital reading expands human artificial memory and causes profound changes in human natural memory. The paper inquires these changes from various perspectives includ- ing neuroscience and psychology, and concludes that digital reading is predominantly a social phenomenon. It looks into the relationships between digital reading and cognitive capitalism, and shows that the theory of digital reading should recognize the topology and dynamics of the Web. It inquires this dynamics using the per- spective of cultural studies, and analyses digital reading in the context of cyber- cultures, community cultures, and algorithmic cultures. Finally, it develops the view to digital reading as a cybercultural concept which understands reading as a cultural behavior that emphasizes an ecosystem of digital practices.

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  • An analysis of U-Value as a measure of variability

    Kong, Xiuyuan; McEwan, James S.A.; Bizo, Lewis A.; Foster, T. Mary (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The variability in behavior has frequently been assessed using a measure known as the U-value. Of concern in this article were the limits and constraints on U-value as a measure of variability. The relation between the U-value and aspects of variability was examined using three sets of simulated data. Our analysis demonstrates that the U-value as a measure of variability on its own fails to capture repetitive patterns in the sequence of responding. The U-value was shown to reflect the evenness of the distributions of responses across the categories/options used; however, when the number of categories actually used by the participant differed from the total number available, the relation between U-values and the number of categories allocated with responses was shown to be nonlinear. It was also shown that the same value of U can represent different levels of evenness in response distributions over categories, depending on the number of categories/options actually used. These constraints and limitations are discussed in relation to how researchers might report on behavioral variability.

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  • The International Law Gaze: The Plain Victory of Tobacco Plain Packaging Legislation in Philip Morris Asia v Australia

    Alvarez-Jimenez, Alberto (2016-12-01)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The legal regime on the protection of foreign investment through international investment agreements passed a very important test recently with the award rendered by an arbitration tribunal (the tribunal) adjudicating the dispute between Philip Morris Asia and Australia (Philip Morris Asia v Australia, Award on Jurisdiction and Admissibility, 17 December 2015. https://www.pcacases.com/web/view/5). The origin of the controversy was the adoption of tobacco plain packaging legislation by the latter in 2011, which Philip Morris regarded as a violation of the standards of protection provided for in the Agreement between the Government of Hong Kong and the Government of Australia for the Promotion and Protection of Investment, signed on September 15, 1993 (the BIT). According to Philip Morris, the legislation barred the use of intellectual property on tobacco products and packaging and had, therefore, substantially reduced the value of Philip Morris’s investment in Australia. Fearing that Australia’s example would start being followed by other nations, Philip Morris did not hesitate in requesting far-reaching relief orders from the tribunal: suspension of the plain packaging legislation and compensation that could be of the order of billions of Australian dollars. (PMA v Australia, para. 8). The tribunal concluded that Philip Morris had carried out an abuse of process, that its claims were inadmissible and, consequently, that the tribunal was precluded from exercising jurisdiction to settle the dispute. (PMA v Australia, para. 588).

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  • ‘It’s on the tip of my Google’: Intra-active performance and the non-totalising learning environment

    Snake-Beings, Emit (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Technologies that expand the learning environment to include interactions outside of the physical space of the classroom, such as the use of Google as an aid to memory, represent one aspect of learning that occurs within several seemingly decentralised spaces. On the other hand, it can be argued that such interactive technologies are enclosed in what Bruno Latour calls a ‘Black-box’: a ‘totalising’ enclosure that delimits interaction and channels users towards yet another form of centralised learning space. Used as a starting point, the focus of this article rapidly shifts from the constraints of the ‘Black-box’ towards a type of engagement that embraces material agency: an engagement with materials and fragments of knowledge that emerge from the ‘non-totalising’ assemblage. To assist in this trajectory, Karen Barad’s concept of intra-activity is employed, where agency is seen as distributed between human and non-human actants. The space in which this engagement between human and materials occurs, as a non-totalising learning space, is the concern of this article, which uses an interactive audio/visual performance event called Bingodisiac as a case study to examine various ways in which we can learn to move beyond the constraints of totalising structures. Bingodisiac is a project initiated by the researcher in 2002, as an informal collection of musicians who are assembled for a one-off improvised performance. This article draws upon interviews and journal notes collected at the time of the performances to explore the analogy of ‘noise music’ and how this can be related to ways in which the learning space of the classroom and the types of knowledge produced have become decentralised.

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  • Supporting lower-achieving seven-and-eight-year-old children with place value understandings

    Bailey, Judy (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The article focuses on the importance of listening to children to identify their current understandings and developing on them systematically, using the materials, to promote a conceptual understanding. It mentions that classroom teachers are responsible for supporting children in their class even when the children represent mathematical understandings and competence.

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  • Gender and sexuality I: Genderqueer geographies?

    Johnston, Lynda (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This review considers gender diversity across a range of spaces and places. I note that while the notion of gender has been troubled, there exists opportunities to trouble it further. I highlight the scholarship that has sought to deconstruct genders, and the binary framing of man/woman and male/female roles and relationships. The queering of sexuality has meant that geographers are now tracing the ways in which lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, queer (LGBTIQ) bodies experience and live their gender beyond normative binaries. Research concerned with relational gendered subjectivities within LGBTIQ communities is discussed, and I flag the trend that this research may conflate gendered experiences while privileging sexual subjectivities. Finally, I turn to the recent interest by geographers who - drawing on queer and trans* theories - argue for new and innovative understandings of gender diversity.

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