2,310 results for Unitec

  • New public management and information communication technology : organisational influences on frontline child protection practice

    Webster, Mike; McNabb, David (2016)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    In this paper the authors examine the new public management (NPM) philosophy influencing the organisational environment in which child protection social workers are located. NPM prioritises outputs through policies, such as results based accountability (RBA) predicated on the expectation that responsibility to achieve designated programme outcomes is sheeted to the agency and its workers. Ongoing funding depends on programme results. NPM ideology assumes that workers and managers in agencies tasked with delivering care and protection services are able to control the variables influencing outputs which contribute to outcomes. The authors will analyse four key aspects of NPM thinking (RBA, outputs, outcomes and key performance indicators) and explore their organisational consequences. The influence on social work practice of information and communications technology (ICT), on which NPM depends, is also considered. The paper is not an ideologically based rejection of NPM, but rather an assessment of its consequences for care and protection practice. The authors call for a return to the centrality of relationally based social work processes embodied in common factors (CF) practice, such as the therapeutic alliance. We argue that CF approaches offer a contrasting and more appropriate practice philosophy than NPM thinking while still enabling achievable, multifaceted organisational benefits.

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  • Housing issues in Auckland

    Haigh, David (2016-02)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Recently, I went to hear Alan Johnson (Salvation Army Policy Analyst) speak on the topic of housing, and how Auckland itself got into this mess. Here are some of my thoughts on that speech. Alan Johnson started by asking how Government is failing Auckland and came up with four key points: Making promises that are not real promises Failing to come up with genuine ideas that will work Failing to understand Auckland and the governance of Auckland Being guilty of not caring

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  • Analysis of results in simulation and modeling of CDMA systems

    Kolahi, Samad (2007-07-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In this paper, using discrete event stochastic simulation by batch-means, new results have been obtained by analysing the sensitivity of CDMA blocking probability for a given traffic load against various number of calls per batch and confidence intervals. It is found that for the system under study one long simulation with one million call arrivals produce approximately 99% confidence in results while it needs 100,000 calls to achieve 95% confidence. For system under study and with 27 Erlang of traffic, the blocking probability is 0.0202 with 99% confidence and 0.0192 with 95% confidence. The impact of warm-up period on CDMA simulation is discussed. Situation with three tiers of neighbouring cells are considered when mobile compares three base stations and chooses the base station with the strongest signal.

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  • Scarcity of ecosystem services : an experimental manipulation of declining pollination rates and its economic consequences for agriculture

    Sandhu, Harpinder; Waterhouse, Benjamin; Boyer, Stephane; Wratten, Steve (2016-07-05)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Ecosystem services (ES) such as pollination are vital for the continuous supply of food to a growing human population, but the decline in populations of insect pollinators worldwide poses a threat to food and nutritional security. Using a pollinator (honeybee) exclusion approach, we evaluated the impact of pollinator scarcity on production in four brassica fields, two producing hybrid seeds and two producing open-pollinated ones. There was a clear reduction in seed yield as pollination rates declined. Open-pollinated crops produced significantly higher yields than did the hybrid ones at all pollination rates. The hybrid crops required at least 0.50 of background pollination rates to achieve maximum yield, whereas in open-pollinated crops, 0.25 pollination rates were necessary for maximum yield. The total estimated economic value of pollination services provided by honeybees to the agricultural industry in New Zealand is NZD $1.96 billion annually. This study indicates that loss of pollination services can result in significant declines in production and have serious implications for the market economy in New Zealand. Depending on the extent of honeybee population decline, and assuming that results in declining pollination services, the estimated economic loss to New Zealand agriculture could be in the range of NZD $295–728 million annually.

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  • Community attitudes and practices of urban residents regarding predation by pet cats on wildlife : an international comparison

    Hall, Catherine M.; Adams, Nigel; Bradley, J. Stuart; Bryant, Kate A.; Davis, Alisa A.; Dickman, Christopher R.; Fujita, Tsumugi; Kobayashi, Shinichi; Lepczyk, Christopher A.; McBride, E. Anne; Pollock, Kenneth H.; Styles, Irene M.; van Heezik, Yolanda; Wang, Ferian; Calver, Michael C. (2016-04-06)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    International differences in practices and attitudes regarding pet cats' interactions with wild-life were assessed by surveying citizens from at least two cities in Australia, New Zealand, the UK, the USA, China and Japan. Predictions tested were: (i) cat owners would agree less than non-cat owners that cats might threaten wildlife, (ii) cat owners value wildlife less than non-cat owners, (iii) cat owners are less accepting of cat legislation/restrictions than non-owners, and (iv) respondents from regions with high endemic biodiversity (Australia, New Zealand, China and the USA state of Hawaii) would be most concerned about pet cats threatening wildlife. Everywhere non-owners were more likely than owners to agree that pet cats killing wildlife were a problem in cities, towns and rural areas. Agreement amongst non-owners was highest in Australia (95%) and New Zealand (78%) and lowest in the UK (38%). Irrespective of ownership, over 85% of respondents from all countries except China (65%) valued wildlife in cities, towns and rural areas. Non-owners advocated cat legislation more strongly than owners except in Japan. Australian non-owners were the most supportive (88%), followed by Chinese non-owners (80%) and Japanese owners (79.5%). The UK was least supportive (non-owners 43%, owners 25%). Many Australian (62%), New Zealand (51%) and Chinese owners (42%) agreed that pet cats killing wildlife in cities, towns and rural areas was a problem, while Hawaiian owners were similar to the mainland USA (20%). Thus high endemic biodiversity might contribute to attitudes in some, but not all, countries. Husbandry practices varied internationally, with predation highest where fewer cats were confined. Although the risk of wildlife population declines caused by pet cats justifies precautionary action, campaigns based on wildlife protection are unlikely to succeed outside Australia or New Zealand. Restrictions on roaming protect wildlife and benefit cat welfare, so welfare is a better rationale.

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  • To what extent is critical thinking affected by language demands in a level seven technical degree course?

    Marsden, Nick; Singh, Niranjan; Clarke, David (2016-04)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Critical thinking can be said to be among the louder ‘buzz phrases’ in education in the 21st century. Both critical thinking and communication are key employability skills. Whilst there is a body of research on critical thinking, and its role in pedagogy, there seems to be a dearth of research linking second language ability and critical thinking. This area probably needs further examination given that it relates to subject specific discourse. Moreover the debate about domain-specific and generalist critical thinking skills is arguably impacted by language in ways that could disadvantage non-native English speakers in their assessed work. This research, carried out with Automotive students in New Zealand, suggests the language support currently given on a Bachelor level course in Automotive may not be adequate, and might need to be made available in different ways because perceptions of language ability may impact on success. The findings from this project suggest that automotive students might in fact prefer more language support. This information would be useful for course designers and facilitators at institutions elsewhere, particularly where courses might attract large numbers of non-native speakers either as international or domestic students. In either case, their perceived needs and expectations on the level of language support required to succeed are a focal point of this project.

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  • Bring your own device to secondary school : the perceptions of teachers, students and parents

    Parsons, David; Adhikari, Janak (2016)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper reports on the first two years of a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) initiative in a New Zealand secondary school, using data derived from a series of surveys of teachers, parents and students, who are the main stakeholders in the transformation to a BYOD school. In this paper we analyse data gathered from these surveys, which consists primarily of qualitative data from free text questions, but also includes some quantitative data from structured questions, giving insights into the challenges faced by teachers, students and parents in moving to a BYOD classroom, and the potential benefits for teaching and learning, and preparing students for a digital world. We frame our analysis from a sociocultural perspective that takes account of structures, agency and cultural practices and the interactions between these domains. Thematic analysis was performed by considering these domains from the responses of the three stakeholder groups. We found that there were some tensions in these domain relationships, with contexts and practices having to be renegotiated as the BYOD classroom and the structures within which it operates have evolved. On the surface, it appears that many of the changes to cultural practice are substitution or augmentation of previous activities, for example using one-to-one devices for researching and presenting material. However, when we look deeper, it is evident that apparently straightforward adoption of digital media is having a more profound impact on structure and agency within the classroom. While the structural impact of digital infrastructures does raise some concerns from all stakeholders, it is clear that it is the curricular structure that is the most contentious area of debate, given its impact on both agency and cultural practice. While the majority of respondents reported positive changes in classroom management and learning, there were nevertheless some concerns about the radical nature of the change to BYOD, though very rarely from teachers. If there is an area where agency may be most problematic, it is in the responses of parents, who may feel increasingly alienated from their children’s learning activities if their own digital skills are lacking. These findings will be of interest to anyone who is engaged in BYOD projects, particularly those who are planning such initiatives or in the early stages of implementation.

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  • Lounging with robots – social spaces of residents in care : a comparison trial

    Peri, Kathryn; Kerse, Ngaire; Broadbent, Elizabeth; Jayawardena, Chandimal; Kuo, Tony; Datta, Chandan; Stafford, Rebecca; MacDonald, Bruce (2016)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Aims: To investigate whether robots could reduce resident sleeping and stimulate activity in the lounges of an older persons’ care facility. Methods: Non-randomised controlled trial over a 12-week period. The intervention involved situating robots in low-level and high-dependency ward lounges and a comparison with similar lounges without robots. A time sampling observation method was utilised to observe resident behaviour, including sleep and activities over periods of time, to compare interactions in robot and no robot lounges. Results: The use of robots was modest; overall 13% of residents in robot lounges used the robot. Utilisation was higher in the low-level care lounges; on average, 23% used the robot, whereas in high-level care lounges, the television being on was the strongest predictor of sleep. Conclusion: This study found that having robots in lounges was mostly a positive experience. The amount of time residents slept during the day was significantly less in low-level care lounges that had a robot.

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  • Simplified method to forecast loss of land and water table changes due to sea level rise caused by climate change

    Li, Jiannan; De Costa, Gregory; Phillips, David (2016-08)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    It is well known that climate change is causing sea levels to change worldwide. This sea level increase is causing loss of land and changes to water table in coastal zones. There are sophisticated models such as ARCGIS, FEEFLOW etc. to model and accurately calculate the changes occurring in these areas. In order to use these models one requires good quality data sets coupled with experienced modellers which is at times sparse and hard to source. Therefore here in this research a simplified method is proposed to estimate the changes occurring in these areas. Initially sea level changes were projected using linear regression method. Changes to land and water table in Wellington New Zealand were simulated, modelled and a simple model was developed using this data to estimate changes. The model was validated using a different data set series. This model could now be used to easily estimate the changes to ground water and land loss in other coastal zones, particularly where data is sparse and technical knowhow on modelling is limited, which is generally the case in most areas.

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  • Application of floating vegetative pads (FVP) to improve stormwater quality : a pilot scale study

    Yu, Ronald; Mahmood, Babar; De Costa, Gregory; Phillips, David (2016-08)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Henderson Creek contributes one of the largest load of sediments & heavy metals (e.g. Copper - Cu and Zinc - Zn) into the Central Waitemata Harbour, Auckland. Cu and Zn particles do not decompose so they are persistent, accumulating on sediments, in filter-feeding shellfish and in plants, and therefore, aquatic health is affected by turbidity and that degrades stormwater pond ecosystem. It is the one of the key item of the Auckland City Council agenda to reduce Cu and Zn in urban storm water detention ponds in order to protect & improve the aquatic ecosystems’ health of stormwater ponds in Auckland Region. A mesocosm study was conducted at Unitec to investigate the performance of Floating Vegetative Pads (FVP, planted with native plants) in terms of their ability to remove heavy metals, particularly, Cu and Zn and the particulates from the storm water detention pond in Hilwell Drive, Henderson. The eight treatments were compared in this experiment i.e. a floating polystyrene pad on its own (treatment G), a floating polystyrene pad with artificial roots (treatment H), and six floating polystyrene pads with six different native plant species (i.e. ApodasmiaSimilis – treatment A, Deschampsia Caespitosa - treatment B, FiniciaNodosa - treatment C, Hierocloe Redolens - treatment D, Lachnagrostis Billardierei - treatment E, PoaAnceps Blue - treatment F) in six individual buckets). Storm water samples were collected in the buckets from the studied pond, and then analysed for pH, Cu and Zn. Plant growth of the six native plants used in this experiment were measured by an increase in their wet mass from the start (day 0) until the end of experiment i.e. day 21. Among all the treatments, B and E treatments removed total Cu (i.e. both dissolved and particulate forms - mg) by 30%. Treatment B and F removed the most total Zn (Zn both in dissolved and particulate forms) by 60% and 50%, respectively. It is not clear why treatment D ended up with more Cu and Zn as compared to the initial values, and this requires further investigation. Although the treatments G and H (i.e. without and with artificial roots) removed Cu and Zn by 20%. The study showed that treatment E had almost 60% increases in wet mass (i.e. increased from 98.5 to 157.5 g/d). The pH of all treatments except treatment G reduced from 7.35 to 6.45. The drop in pH levels could be due to the bacterial activity happening in the rhizosphere, which releases rhizo deposits and that can drop pH.The treatments E and F had the most area daily Cu-mass removal rates i.e. 0.074 and 0.082 mg/m2/d (i.e. 7.4 and 8.2 mg/100 m2/d), respectively. Whereas, treatment B performed well in terms areal daily Zn-mass removal rate of 0.496 mg/m2/d (i.e. 49.6 mg/100 m2/d).

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  • Enhancing educational success through Talanoa : a framework for the Pacific

    Prescott, James; Fua, Seu’ula Johansson (2016-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Talanoa is a traditional means of oral communication common to the Island nations of the Pacific. This paper introduces a framework for alleviating student success and retention at early childhood education, primary and secondary schools for Pacific students learning in a social context outside of their own culture. The framework is based on traditional talanoa as a research tool and methodology. In particular, the paper discusses the application talanoa as part of the assessment process, curriculum development, teaching and learning, and evaluation. The proposed framework draws on the experiences and design of the Te Kotahitanga project introduced in New Zealand in 2001 and will be relevant to the ongoing aim to improve educational success and retention among Pacific students. Given the discussions draw on experience in New Zealand over the past twenty years, it will be of particular relevance to local policy developers.

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  • Flat tax in New Zealand : unemployment and social security taxes 1930-70

    Rankin, Keith (2016-06)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    With the concept of a Universal Basic Income (UBI) being mooted this year as an important reform that can facilitate our adaption to a flexible work-world characterised by short-term contracts, inequality and automation, it becomes instructive to investigate historical precedents. In particular, unconditional income (including negative income tax) solutions are linked – at least in economists' minds – to a flatter (if not flat, ie proportional) income tax structure. The practical reconceptualisation and reform of income tax and benefits that I would argue for is indeed a proportional income tax, initially set at 33 percent, coupled with a minimum publicly-sourced personal credit set initially at $175 per week ($9,080 per year).1 Such a 'basic income flat tax' schema adapts easily to New Zealand's present tax and benefits levels, and will be affordable in the near future if not already. It would allow many people – especially young people – on benefits, student allowances or low wages to bypass the Work and Income bureaucracy and get on with their lives, leaving Work and Income to focus on addressing specific needs and deprivation, and allowing sole parents to benefit directly from Child Support agreements or impositions. In this paper I investigate the flat (sometimes 'flattish') income tax that existed, under various names, between 1930 and 1970. Initially an 'unemployment tax' (the mainstay of an Unemployment Fund), in 1936 it was repackaged as an 'employment promotion tax'. Then in 1938 it was boosted and further repackaged as a 'social security tax' (with its associated Social Security Fund). From the outset, the social security tax came to be closely associated in the public mind with the universal superannuation benefit that commenced in 1940 at a modest £10 ($20) per year. This new benefit co-existed with the means-tested age-benefit, then £78 per year. The mechanism set in the 1938 Social Security Act was that the superannuation benefit would increase by £2.5 each year until it reached the level of the age-benefit, at which point the universal superannuation would displace the age-benefit for persons over 65. However, there was no explicit provision for inflation-indexing in the legislation. Inflation had not been a problem in the 1920s and 1930s, but would become so from the 1940s and most of all in the 1950s.

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  • Harnessing potential : trade educators and the transformation of a workforce

    Maurice-Takerei, Lisa (2016-08)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Transforming the educational and training workforce Incumbent on organisations and industry to ensure that there is a teaching workforce that has …. Educator knowledge and skills enhances educator agency and the ability to support the development of a flexible, knowledgeable, skilled and adaptable workforce engaged in continuous learning

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  • What to do about student selection for social work programmes?

    Hughes, Catherine; McNabb, David; Ashley, Paul (2016-11)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Research project: *This paper is a precursor to a research project being undertaken by the authors which is focused on the Aotearoa New Zealand (ANZ) context – A single school case study from Unitec *Multivariate analysis of scores achieved during selection processes by different groups of applicants *Selection scores will be examined in relation to eventual student success *Second article will report on the findings.

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  • How to play when you don't know all the rules

    Gambolati, Rob (2016-07)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    It is widely discussed that physical education is missed out on in primary schools because of a lack of confidence and/or competence in teachers. Fortunately the current curriculum promotes five key competencies that teachers can use to put students at the front of physical education.

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  • CSWEANZ : fit & proper survey results

    Hughes, Catherine; Staniforth, Barbara; Adamson, Carole; Hancox, John; McNabb, David (2016-11)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    [2nd slide] Your feedback is important as it will assist us to: 1. Gain a picture of the processes that Schools of Social Work currently use in selection processes and declining applications, as well as ongoing assessment of fit and proper criteria within programmes. 2. Identify the fit and proper issues that emerge for Schools of Social Work. 3. Assist in the preparation of a report for CSWEANZ that will enable Schools to develop a shared understanding of the issues and to participate and contribute to national debate and development. Part ONE of the survey relates to the process of assessing fit and proper criteria on selection of candidates. Part TWO identifies the formal processes your institute engages throughout the four years of social work programme to manage academic performance and disciplinary processes. Part THREE examines the embedded processes of assessment for fit and proper criteria used within the degree.

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  • Programming around the jewels : threshold concepts in physical education

    McCall, Nichola; McKay, Anne; Thompson, Kylie (2016-07)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    How did we end up here? Wanted to think differently about course design – What is a ‘physically educated’ student? Concerned about an over-reliance on standards for course design Curiosity around scholarship (esp. students not taking PE) Pancake effect in interdisciplinary environments Concern that students physical education discipline knowledge is often siloed. Today we hope to: EXPLORE threshold concepts in PE together And CONSIDER the use of threshold concepts in senior PE course design

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  • The effectiveness of a commercially available bird repellent on house sparrows (Passer domesticus)

    Cameron, Kristie; Adams, N. J.; Wassenaar, R. J.; Bistricer, A.; Brown, K. J.; Halliday, A. D.; Lodge-Osborn, K. R.; Robson, E. A.; Jones, Graham; Salinsky, Jodi; Fraser, Diane (2016-07)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Aim: Identify a robust method for assessing the efficacy of an odour repellent to the sparrow in aviary studies Use this method in field studies to isolate the effects of the repellent on sparrow behaviour

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  • Goldfinger revisited. James Bond set designs by Ken Adam as modernist spaces of power

    Schnoor, Christoph; Wilson, Scott (2016-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Ken Adam (b. 1921) developed set designs for seven of the early James Bond films and a number of other important works. Goldfinger (1964) is among the most famous of these films, and Adam’s designs have since made film and design history, featuring in a number of influential exhibitions and publications. Adam’s life as an exiled German Jew, who studied architecture in London and who flew for the RAF during the Second World War, means, as Petra Kissling-Koch’s suggests in her exploration of Adam’s work, that these designed spaces of (evil) power as the hideouts of Bond’s antagonists can be understood directly in relation to Adam’s historical context and biography. This paper offers a close examination of Adam’s designs, paying particular attention to the development of the Bond series through Dr No, Goldfinger and You Only Live Twice, and the ways in which Adam’s work makes visible a historically and contextually informed relationship between architecture, power and the representation of evil. While the cinematic representations of the spaces of evil – especially in the Bond franchise – evolve and alter over time, Adam’s work is important for, at least, two reasons: First, Adam’s designs concretely associate in popular culture the relationship between modernist architecture and specific articulations of power. Second, Adam’s designs foreground set design as a site of narrative detail, rather than merely being the place within which the narrative occurs. While these monumental sets were designed to function within an ‘evil’ role and therefore use an architectural language already associated with specific articulations of power, Adam’s set designs also make visible a version of modernist architecture that was attractive and which may have strongly influenced the general public’s perception of modern architecture. Adam’s promotion of modernist architecture through the medium of film establishes a template for the representation of the spaces of power within the spy genre that are, themselves, so powerful that they quickly become the de-facto blueprint for subsequent representations.

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  • Mapping the potential range of the brown marmorated stink bug in New Zealand

    Aguilar, Glenn; Fraser, Diane; Kumar, Shivani (2016-07)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Aim and Objectives: Predict the suitability of New Zealand to the BMSB Ensemble the predictions of best performing Species Distribution Modelling algorithms using worldwide occurrence of BMSB and environmental data Project the model into New Zealand using current and future climate scenarios

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