1,263 results for 1970

  • Swaggers and society : a New Zealand experience

    Steven, Graeme D. (1979)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    The aims of this study are two-fold. First, to reach an understanding of the swagger, his lifestyle, and his outlook on life. And second, to investigate the relationships between the swagger and various groups in New Zealand society, in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The North Otago region was chosen as a base for the study because it has traditionally been regarded as one of the main swagger areas in New Zealand. The main town of Oamaru had a population of 4000 to 6000 in the 1890's, and was neither wholly urban or rural. As the service centre for the North Otago hinterland and a road, rail and sea centre, Oamaru had large numbers of itinerants, passing through the town. In the rural hinterland mixed cropping predominated, and this required large numbers of seasonal workers, which were drawn from outside the region. In Chapter One it is argued that rural itinerant workers were integrated into a rural structure that was both labour intensive and seasonal. Chapter Two discusses the characteristics which separate the swagger from other rural itinerants, which I have called, the "swag-carriers". In Chapter Three the conflict between the swagger and a developing bureaucracy, and middle class ideology in the late nineteenth century, is analysed. In Chapters Four and Five, the attitudes of rural and towns people towards the swagger are investigated. A model based on the value system of "reputation" and "respectability is used in Chapter Six to explain the ambivalence of attitudes towards the swagger, and to investigate an important aspect of the swagger psychology - his self esteem and his individuality.

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  • Bureaucracy and professionalism in an educational organisation : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Education at Massey University

    Shaw, Brian (1971)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The development of human societies has been in essence a development of forms of social organisation. In modern societies, social organisation is complex, diverse, and characterised by conditions of industrialisation, division of labour, urbanisation, and the aggregation of individuals into large organisations with specific purposes. One form of social organisation which has developed to maintain social relationships in such conditions is the bureaucracy. Bureaucracies as structures, or systems of rational procedures deliberately set up to achieve specifically prescribed social ends, affect to some degree the lives of all citizens of modern societies. Educational organisations are bureaucratised to varying degrees, and the rapid and accelerating demand for popular education suggests that bureaucratisation is likely to be a dominating characteristic of education in the future.

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  • The comparative profitability of milk and beef production on seasonal supply dairy farms : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Agricultural Science in Farm Management at Massey University

    Lattimore, Ralph G (1970)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Irregular pagination: pg 111 missing - not in vault copy

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  • Aspects of Maukean population migration : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Geography at Massey University

    Gordon, Graeme David James (1974)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The increasing dissatisfaction and rising aspirations of many Pacific peoples has prompted an increased amount of outmigration to larger metropolitan countries where it is perceived that these desires can be fulfilled. Migration of Cook Islanders to New Zealand is no new phenomenon. In recent years, however, for a great diversity of reasons, the flow has reached alarming proportions. The repercussions of such a displacement of population are significant both for donor and recipient areas. Although several studies have focused attention on migrant groups in New Zealand, literature linking the whole migratory process from the island of origin is not quite so readily available. It is becoming apparent that more attention must be directed at the causal factors which induce would-be migrants to forfeit a familiar way of life for one which can be initially bewildering.

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  • Recreational resource management : Kapiti Island, a New Zealand case study of visitor usage, and perception: a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts at Massey University

    Hook, Trevor (1978)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This study was undertaken as a requirement for completion of a Master of Arts in Geography. My thanks go to the Geography Department Massey University, especially Professor K. Thompson, Dr. R. Le Heron and Mr. E. Warr for their valuable guidance throughout this research period. The topic of research also had the support of Lands and Survey Department, Wellington. People of the Lands and Survey Department in both the local District and the Head Office in Wellington were very co-operative, and permission was obtained to run a questionnaire for permit-holders visiting Kapiti Island. Great assistance was offered by both Mr. Bruce Tubb (Head Office, Wellington), and Mr. G.A. Turner, (Senior Planning Officer, Wellington Regional Office). Special thanks go to the Ranger and his family Mr and Mrs P. Daniel, who live on Kapiti Island for their assistance and support throughout the Survey period.

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  • The Church Defence Society of Otago and Southland, 1897: a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in History at Massey University

    Barber, Lawrence Harold (1970)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    In recent years there has been a marked increase of interest in New Zealand church history and sectarian controversy. Research into the beliefs and behaviour of early European missionaries has occupied the research time of an increasing number of post-graduate students during the last five years and has resulted in such useful works as Judith Binney's published analysis of the beliefs and behaviour of Thomas Kendall 1 Judith Binney, The Legecy of Guilt (Oxford, 1968). and John Owens' doctoral investigation of the Hokianga Wesleyans. 2 John Owens, "The Coming of the Wesleyons to New Zealand, 1819-1840", Unpublished PhD thesis, Victoria University of Wellington, 1969. Hugh Laracy, in his portrayal of Bishop Moran, 3 Hugh Laracy, "The Life and Context of Bishop Patrick Moran," Unpublished M.A. Thesis, Victoria University or Wellington, 1964. P.S. O'Connor, through his racy description of Catholic - Protestant conflict, 4 P.S. O'Connor, "Sectarian Conflict in New Zealand, 1911-1920", Political Science, 19 (i), July, 1967, PP. 3-16. and J. McKay with his consideration of the development within New Zealand of a parochial school systen,5 J.Mackey, "The Catholic Schools and the Denominational System of Education in Auckland. 1840-68", Unpublished M.A. Thesis, University of Auckland, 1960. have notably contributed to the history of the Roman Catholic Church. Research by P.F. McKimmey 6 P.F. McKimmeys, "The Prohibition Movement in New Zealand, 1885-1894" unpublished M.A. Thesis, Auckland University, 1968. and K.G. Geard 7 K.J. Geard, "The Prohibition Movement, 1894-1914", unpublished M.A. Thesis, Victoria University of Wellington, In Progress. into the nature of the New Zealand prohibition movement and Ian Breward's published monograph on Bible-in-Schools controversies 8 Ian Breward, Godless Schools? (Christchurch, 1967.) have made available analysis of socio-religious conflicts that divided New Zealanders from the late nineteenth century until well into the twentieth century. In the field of contemporary church history a symposium on religion in New Zealand including articles by J. Mols, J. Harre, and W.H. Oliver,9 W.H. Oliver, W. Merlin Davies, Lloyd G. Geering et al; Landfall, XX (1), March 1966, pp.4-59. posed questions about present day New Zealand ecelesiastical life that cannot be satisfactorily answered without an awareness of the theological and sociological development of the New Zealand churches and sects.

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  • Continuous buttermaking : a process capability study : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Technology in Industrial Management at Massey University

    Stockwell, Dean Thomas John (1972)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Continuous buttermaking has become an important process in the New Zealand Dairy Industry. From the first experimental trials in 1964 conducted by staff of the New Zealand Dairy Research Institute, continuous manufacture of butter by the Fritz process has now reached a commercial production of over 80,000 tons. Process control of the buttermaking process plays an important part in determining the economic return on the product. At this stage adequate information is available on the general operating principles of Continuous churns. However, in the absence of change in the operating conditions the product continues to show compositional variation. There is little information available to determine the causes of such variation. The work undertaken during this project was primarily aimed at investigation of this variation. It was conducted as a process capability study. It is clear that Continuous Buttermaking will continue to be an important process in the New Zealand Dairy Industry for some time, and it is essential that further information regarding the proceas is made available in order to facilitate improved process control.

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  • Growth and diversification in New Zealand's agriservice industry : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Geography at Massey University

    Campbell, Colin Terence (1979)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The thesis has been designed to research the problem of how the stock and station companies have developed from single product or single function firms and then evolved into large diversified mercantile corporations. The hypothesis surmises that the firms have followed trends in the growth of other large overseas companies which has meant changes in function, structure and especially unique to this industry, spatial changes. The geographic nature of the problem is centred on the companies expansion through time and space in the New Zealand economy. In studying this topic it is necessary to comprehend the basic components of corporate growth, diversification and the uniquity of the agriservice industry, a 'colonial invention' (MacDonald, 1975) of Australasia. In order to conceptualise the geography of the problem a model has been utilised to illustrate the spatial changes that agriservice companies have undergone when competing for space over New Zealand. The model, figure 1.1. refers to the thresholds of development, requirements that have to be met by a firm in order to increase its operating space. This change in scale results in an increase of activities and the organisational scale of the firm over time.

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  • Agrarian aspirations and demands as illustrated by the 1905 Royal Commission on Land Tenure : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in History at Massey University

    Bailey, Ross Leonard (1972)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This essay is an examination of the 1905 Royal Commission report on Land Tenure. The introduction examines the Commission's final report and looks at its reception. The report and newspapers are set against each other in order to show what pressures were exerted on the Commission to come out in favour of the freehold. The essay also looks at the Minutes of evidence in order that themes not apparent in the final report can be examined. The aspirations and demands of witnesses are considered in relation to their background: rural and Urban, pro-freehold and pro-land nationalization. Newspapers and parliamentary debates are used where they comment or throw light on the evidence in the minutes and on the general issue of the freehold-leasehold controversy. The essay examines the idea that the freehold-leasehold controversy had a greater emotional dimension than a practical one. The practical side, however, has not been ignored. Two areas were selected for examination and were fairly representative of the problems throughout New Zealand. The conclusion suggests that the emotional aspect of the freehold-leasehold issue was largely a result of the agitation by freeholders, in order to preserve their way of life against the encroaching land nationalizers. The leaseholders were upset by the fear of having their rents revalued, and once this fear was removed most leasees-in-perpetuity were content with the lease-in-perpetuity system.

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  • Aokautere basins : a study in morphometry : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Geography at Massey University

    Lee, Nanyang (1973)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    1.1 Location Of The Study Area The location of the study area is shown in Figure 1. It comprises part of the terrace to the south-east of the Manawatu River just opposite Palmerston North City centre. Almost all the area of the two drainage basins studied is within the boundary of Palmerston North City which has been expanded since 1967 to include land on this side of the river. This suburb is generally known as Aokautere. Both streams selected for study are secondary tributaries to the Manawatu River (Figure 2). They are here designated as Alton Creek, on the left, and Bolton Creek on the right, and the trunk stream they join before entering the Manawatu River is named Cliff Stream. The exact location of the study area can be found on NZMS 1 N149, the "Palmerston North" sheet, between grids E130 and E150, and N290 and N330. The township of Aokautere is about one mile northeast of the study area.

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  • The long term residential treatment of delinquent boys by the Child Welfare Division of the Department of Education.

    Campbell, John Baird. (1971)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Comments on the New Zealand Security Intelligence Service Act.

    Tristram, Richard Hamish. (1970)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • The development of Paremoremo Prison.

    Weiss, Gary Hilton. (1973)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Censorship of films : conflict in focus.

    Pirie, Andrew J., (1976)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Aspects of the osmotic and water balance of the New Zealand native frog Leiopelma hochstetteri fitzinger, and the Australian whistling frog Litoria ewingi dumeril and bibron : a thesis ... for the degree of Master of Science in Zoology

    Cameron, Murray Colin (1974)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Rates of dehydration and rates of water uptake when hydrated or dehydrated are described for two species of frogs of similar size from different habitats. No detectable differences in rates of water loss in frogs of both species of comparable size were noted. Considerable differences were seen in rates of water uptake. These uptake rates were lower in hydrated and dehydrated Le. hochstetteri than in hydrated Li. ewingi. Differences in rates of water uptake were reflected in measurements of skin permeability and blood plasma osmolality. Rates of water uptake in Li. ewingi were dramatically increased after dehydration, and it was proposed that this was due to hormonal mediation. The osmotic permeability of different skin regions in frogs of different species may vary in the presence or absence of oxytocin or vasopressin. This was not observed in Le. hochstetteri where the skin exhibited relatively uniform permeability, but was seen in Li. ewingi and Li. aurea. In these two species, the abdominal skin was more permeable and more readily stimulated by oxytocin or vasopressin than the dorsal skin. Oxytocin and vasopressin also increased the short circuit current (inward Na+transport) through both dorsal and ventral skin in Le. hochstetteri, but most noticeably through the ventral skin in Li. ewingi and Li. aurea. The skin was observed to be thinner in Li. ewingi than in Le. hochstetteri or Li. aurea. Thin areas in the ventral pelvic integument of Li. ewingi and Li. aurea and the presence of epidermal capillaries in these two species are thought to be of importance in water uptake. It has been suggested that water uptake mechanisms are a major factor determining the distribution of the three frog species.

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  • Adolescent-parent conflict as preceived by the adolescent : a study of the development of independence in adolescence : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment for the degree of Master of Arts in Education

    Chong, Helen (1975)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The development of independence is one of the major developmental tasks of adolescence. The development of two aspects of independence - economic independence and emotional independence - were considered in this study. It was postulated that when the individual is emotionally dependent on his parents, and acceptant of being so, the degree of conflict with parents is low and that during the period of striving for emotional independence the degree of conflict with parents rises to a maximum, then falls as emotional independence is established. After a consideration of factors stated in the literature to be related to adolescent-parent conflict the following hypothesis was developed and tested: for those adolescents living with their parents who are by law permitted to engage in full time employment there is an inverse relation between the degree of economic independence and the degree of conflict with parents, regardless of age, sex, socio-economic status and whether or not the adolescent is a student. A scale to measure degree of conflict was developed and used to assess degree of conflict with mother, with father, and with both parents together. From 133 responses to the questionnaire designed to test this hypothesis a sample of 85 Europeans, ranging in age from 15 to 19 years who came from families where both the natural parents were present was obtained. The hypothesis was not verified. Conflict with mother was found to decrease with age. No other factors were found to be related to degree of conflict. An analysis of the areas of conflict indicated, on average, a greater number of areas of conflict with mother than with father and a greater number of areas of conflict with father than with both parents together. Examination of the highest ranking areas indicated that adolescents argue more with their mothers about specific home-centered topics and more with their fathers and both parents together about abstract and external topics. This difference in the nature of adolescent-parent conflict was explained in terms of the structure of the New Zealand family and the role each parent plays in the family.

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  • A critical analysis of the methodology of selected major accounting theorists since 1960 : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Agricultural Business in Accounting at Massey University

    Gaffikin, M. J. R. (Michael John Renny) (1978)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    There has recently been a significant amount of effort and space in the accounting theory literature devoted to attempts to determine a suitable methodological base for accounting. While some may take this to indicate that accounting is intellectually immature, it can also be taken to mean that accounting thinkers are aware of the need for a sound structure on which to develop the discipline: they have attempted to apply accepted scientific methods for research programmes and theory construction. It is important that the scientific methods chosen are themselves sufficiently rigorous and accepted as meeting these needs. This thesis is concerned with examining the work of four accounting writers who appear to have had a significant influence on accounting thought - Raymond Chambers, Yuji Ijiri, Richard Mattessich and Robert Sterling. Although no one year can be held to be more significant than others, 1960, as the beginning of the decade in which most of the work was carried out, has been selected as the boundary of this analysis. The four selected theorists have all produced major works since that date. In order to provide a perspective from which to assess the methodology of the theorists some space is devoted to tracing the thought on scientific theory construction over the last seventy years. It has included a brief survey of the major characteristics of logical positivism, and the work of philosophers who have reacted against that movement - Popper, Kuhn, Feyerabend and others. It is shown that accounting theorists have tended to rely too heavily on a logical positivist position to determine the process by which research is undertaken and theories constructed. If the work of those philosophers of science who have reacted against the positivist position can be accepted as providing a more suitable expression of how knowledge is attained then accounting theorists have erred. With the possible exception of Chambers, from an analysis of theoretical works since 1960, this appears to be so.

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  • Tongans in Auckland : a preliminary investigation of the Tongan community in the Central Auckland urban area : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in geography at Massey University

    Whitehead, David Warwick (1974)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The minority Polynesian community examined in this thesis required more than those research techniques familiar to students of migrant groups. Specific interviewing difficulties and solutions to these are proposed for interviewing Tongans. Suggestions to overcome the suspicions of respondents and the dangers of ethnocentrisim on the part of the researcher are also suggested. A questionnaire is included and its design, to include internal checks and ease in tabulation are noted. Chapter Two deals with migration motives, both real and stated. These motives are confined in the main, to those acting at the source, Tonga, and include population pressures on land, housing, employment and capital. Data is provided from recent surveys in Tonga, together with the results of a survey of Tongans residing in the Central Auckland Urban Area, 1974. An examination of data provided by the Department of Statistics, concerning arrivals and departures, is included in Chapter Three. This is supplemented with data on airfares and the manner in which the migrant raised sufficient capital to purchase his passage, from the survey. Special attention is paid to permits and the reason why some Tongans have overstayed their legally permitted stay. Chapter Four compares the demographic and social characteristics of Tongans with other Polynesians in New Zealand. Age, marital status, dependents, sex, religion, birthplace and educational qualifications of migrants in the survey are recorded. The results of an investigation into the occupational and residential characteristics of Tongan migrants are recorded in Chapters Five and Six. Comparison is drawn between the unskilled occupations of Tongans and other Polynesians and the location of place of work and residence is noted. The method of securing initial employment revealed the social and psychological pressures impinging on the recent migrant and reasons and results suggested. Using data supplied by the Department of Statistics the spatial distribution of Tongans in New Zealand, and in particular each statistical subdivision of Auckland is recorded. Movement over time within the Central Auckland Urban Area is discussed using indices of segregation and a Lorenz Curve.

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  • The Ballance tradition and its permeation in Wanganui : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in History at Massey University

    Stewart, Kevin Lance (1970)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    While the main centres and the West Coast of South Island seemed to be in an uproar in 1912-13 Wanganui remained calm. Why was this? The aim of this thesis is to investigate the unionist and political activity of Wanganui as a secondary centre; to explain not only why no unrest took place in 1912-13 but also to discover what was essentially different about this secondary centre compared to what happened in Wellington in 1912-13. For this purpose the study has been concentrated around the unionistic and political activities of W A Veitch. It is easiest to centre this study around Veitch because he was politically paramount from 1911-35. Frequently he initiated patterns but to a large extent he was able to retain power because he reflected patterns and responded to the actualities of Wanganui politics. The "Ballance Tradition" was the key factor in Wanganui politics. No politician could hope to gain power in Wanganui unless he remained within the limits it imposed. Veitch was keenly aware of this and his political career is an example of the "Ballance Tradition" in action. This was not an ideological tradition. There was little room in Wanganui for ideology as militant labour was to discover. The "Ballance Tradition" was largely one of attitude and of political behaviour which encouraged cooperation between working class and middle class, reflecting the Liberal synthesis of the 1890's. It stressed broadly humanitarian goals which were to be achieved by an evolutionary process. It saw the needs of Wanganui as a whole and was opposed to specifically sectional demands.

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  • Bionomics of the pied stilt (Himantopus leucocephalus) in New Zealand : with special reference to breeding behaviour: a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Zoology at Massey University

    McConkey, Brian F (1971)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Aims of the Study. Although the Pied Stilt, Himantopus h.leucocephalus, Gould,1837*Nomenclature for New Zealand birds follows that laid down in the Annotated Checklist of the Birds of New Zealand (Kinsky,1970). Other bird species are as prescribed in the Handbook of British Birds (Witherby et al, 1943) or in the specific reference works quoted. is one of New Zealand's most common wading birds there has been very little published work on it. The purpose of this study therefore was to gain knowledge of the general biology of the Pied Stilt with special reference to breeding behaviour. It has been suggested (L.Gurr, pers.comm.) that the large numbers of Pied Stilt may be responsible for genetic swamping, through interbreeding, of the Black Stilt Himantopus novaezealandiae Gould, 1841 which is now quite rare and its breeding range restricted to a very small area of New Zealand - the Waitaki River system. The intention was that this study should provide information as a background to further investigation of the problem. This study is based on field observations made between February 1969 and December 1970 in the Manawatu district around Palmerston North, where Pied Stilts are found in large enough numbers to permit relatively easy observation, except during the winter months when their numbers drop considerably.

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