9,871 results for ResearchCommons@Waikato

  • The history and practice of lying in public life

    Peters, Michael A. (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This paper provides an introduction to the history and practice of lying in public life. The paper argues that such an approach is required to balance the emphasis on truth and truth-telling. Truth and lies, truth-telling and the practice of lying are concepts of binary opposition that help define one another. The paper reviews Foucault's work on truth-telling before analyzing the "culture of lying" and its relation to public life by focusing on Arendt's work.

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  • The postcolonial university

    Peters, Michael A. (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Derrida is, perhaps, the foremost philosopher of the humanities and of its place in the university. Over the long period of his career he has been concerned with the fate, status, place and contribution of the humanities. Through his deconstructive readings and writings he has done much not only to reinvent the Western tradition by attending closely to those texts which constitute it but also he has redefined its procedures and protocols, questioning and commenting upon the relationship between commentary and interpretation, the practice of quotation, the delimitation of a work and its singularity, its signature, and its context – the whole form of life of literary culture, together with textual practices and conventions that shape it. From his very early work he has occupied a marginal in-between space –simultaneously, textual, literary, philosophical, and political – a space that permitted him a freedom to question, to speculate and to draw new limits to humanitas. Derrida has demonstrated his power to reconceptualize and to reimagine the humanities in the space of the contemporary university. This paper discusses Derrida’s tasks for the new humanities (Trifonas & Peters, 2005).

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  • Te reo Maori, philosophy and colonialism: A conversation with Maori philosopher Carl Mika

    Peters, Michael A.; Mika, Carl Te Hira (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Kia ora Carl Some advice if you have the time... I have been asked to give a paper at Uppsala on philosophy of language and autonomy. I want to focus on colonialism and use some examples from the colonial history concerning te reo Maori. I did a little research at the time of the Royal Commission in 1988 but have lost touch with the literature. Are there a couple of strategic texts you would recommend? Nga Mihi Kia ora Michael You tend to get two types of writing about the language: its revitalisation; and its link to the natural or spiritual worlds – which is to do with philosophy in a particular sense, but in my view doesn’t have an eye towards the “autonomy” part you raise (i.e. isn’t cognisant enough of colonialism). The latter writing theorises around the traditional place of language, or describes it as a traditional phenomenon. I’ve been considering writing something for some time on it, but just haven’t gotten around to it. You could discuss it in terms of how current uses of it in government policy etc. force the Maori language to become no more or no less than its English counterpart. So, for instance, language is an arbitrary (Saussure) thing that has very little in the way of “essence” in its own (autonomous) right. Terms like “whakapapa” equate precisely with “genealogy” but their interconnecting sense is lost in that translation. From a Maori belief, it could be argued that everything contains an essence, including words, and this essence precedes our interaction with language. In a way, language very much opens up a worldview, including the autonomy or essence of things in the world and their interconnectedness. pp. 101–110

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  • On narratives of self-formation and education

    Peters, Michael A. (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    In this paper I begin with Schleiermacher review and analyze the origins of the Humboldtian model of the modern German university as an influential kind of institution that was adopted in many parts of Europe, the US and beyond. The novel of education and of ethical self-formation came to provide a novelistic depicted of the essential human becoming of the hero protagonist and engendered a new genre that spread throughout the world. The paper asks the question where and what might be the novel of the neoliberal university in an age when the humanistic requirement has fallen away and students have become “customers” purchasing an educational service. Is there a novel of the neoliberal university that does not end- lessly replicate the logic of the marketplace but actually intervenes in material reality to “save” the institution? JEL codes: H52; H75; I21; I23 Keywords: Humboldt; Schleiermacher; Fichte; German University; Bildungsroman; Erziehungsroman; Morgenstern; Bakhtin; novel of education; self-formation, educational self-transformation

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  • Transgressive learning in times of global systemic dysfunction: interview with Arjen Wals

    Peters, Michael A.; Wals, Arjen E.J. (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Arjen Wals is Professor of Transformative Learning for Socio-Ecological Sustainability at Wageningen University. He also holds the UNESCO Chair of Social Learning and Sustainable Development. Furthermore he is the Carl Bennet Guest Professor in Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) at Gothenburg University in Sweden. He obtained his PhD in 1991 with a Fulbright fellowship at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. His dissertation tackled the interface of environmental psychology and environmental and sustainability education. His recent work focuses on transformative social learning in vital coalitions of multiple stakeholders at the interface of science and society. His teaching and research focus on designing learning processes and learning spaces that enable people to contribute meaningfully sustainability. A central question in his work is: how to create conditions that support (new) forms of learning which take full advantage of the diversity, creativity and resourcefulness that is all around us, but so far remain largely untapped in our search for a world that is more sustainable than the one currently in prospect? In 2014 he was the lead author of an article published in Science Magazine on the role of citizen science in bridging science education, environmental education and sustainability. He is editor and co-editor of a number of popular books including: Higher Education and the Challenge of Sustainability (Kluwer Academic, 2004), Creating Sustainable Environments in our Schools (Trentham, 2006), Social Learning towards a Sustainable World with foreword by Fritjof Capra and an afterword by Michael Apple (Wageningen Academic, 2007), Learning for Sustainability in Times of Accelerating Change (2012), and of Routledge’s International Handbook on Environmental Education Research (2013). He has (co)authored over 250 publications in multiple languages. Wals is a co-founder of Caretakers of the Environment/International and a recipient of the environmental education research award of the North American Association for Environmental Education, and former president of the Special Interest Group on Environmental & Ecological Education of the AERA. He writes a regular research blog that signals developments in the emerging field of sustainability education: www.transformativelearning.nl

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  • A biopolítica pós-colonial no império do capital: Linhas foucaultianas de investigação nos Estudos Educacionais

    Peters, Michael A. (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Conferência "A Biopolítica Pós-Colonial no Império do Capital: Linhas foucaultianas de investigação nos Estudos Educacionais" ministrada pelo Prof. Dr. Michael Peters – University of Illinois – EUA, no dia 22 de setembro de 2015.

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  • Interview with Michael Apple: The biography of a public intellectual

    Peters, Michael A. (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Michael W. Apple is the John Bascom Professor of Curriculum and Instruction and Educational Policy Studies in the Departments of Curriculum and Instruction (CI) and Educational Policy Studies (EPS) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Education where he has taught since 1970. Michael Apple is one of the foremost educational theorists in the world and a public intellectual who is deeply committed to empowerment and transformation of people through education. Professor Apple specializes in understanding and analyzing the relations between education and power. He has made major contributions to the fields of cultural politics, curriculum theory and research, and critical teaching. He has been a tireless advocate and activist-theorist for development of democratic schools over four decades. He began teaching in elementary and secondary schools in New Jersey where he grew up and served as president of the local teachers' union. He has spent his career working with educators, unions, dissident and disadvantaged groups throughout the world on democratizing educational policy and practice. Professor Apple's research centers on the limits and possibilities of critical educational policy and practice in a time of conservative restoration.

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  • Anxieties of knowing: Academic pathologies, critical philosophy and the culture of self

    Peters, Michael A. (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This exploratory paper coins the term “academic pathologies” to discuss in a critical approach the culture of the academic self focusing on what is called “anxieties of knowledge”. The paper plays with these themes in reference to the work of Kierkegaard, the American film director Woody Allen, and Jacques Derrida. This topic and paper has eluded me over the years as I tried to gapple with various formulations. The paper that follows the history of my failed attempts is an exercise in self-therapy, confession and self-examination about my continuing in- ability to produce this paper.

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  • The university in the epoch of digital reason: Fast knowledge in the circuits of cybernetic capitalism

    Peters, Michael A. (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article examines the university institutional in relation to the notion of time by postulating the concept of “the epoch of digital reason.” Within this epoch the university exhibits “fast knowledge” flows of knowledge in the circuits of “cybernetic capitalism.” The paper introduces the university on speed through the work of Paul Virilio and then in the next sections examines “the epoch of digital reason,” fast knowledge and fast capitalism and “the cybernetic hypothesis” including a conception of the university and “speed politics” within cybernetic capitalism.

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  • Marx, education and the possibilities of a fairer world: Reviving radical political economy through foucault

    Olssen, Mark; Peters, Michael A. (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Although this paper constitutes a revision of a paper originally published in 2007 [see note 1), the editors are pleased to republish this paper due to its theoretical importance for the critique of Marxism as well the interest it creates for establishing the possibility of a new political economy based upon the work of Michel Foucault. The paper documents and interrogates the contradictions between postmodernism and poststructuralism with Marxism. Starting by documenting the crisis of the Left at the start of the twenty-first century, an attempt is made to radically critique and reappraise Marxism in a direction set out by Foucault. The paper is not so much an attempt to meld Marxism and poststructuralism but rather to generate a new poststructuralist historical materialism which still has equality and fairness as its central concerns, but which goes beyond the traditional problems of Marxism based on its adherence to outmoded methodologies and theoretical modes of analysis. Echoing well known critiques of Marxist historical materialism, the paper focuses on forms of articulation drawn from the revolution in language influenced by post-modernism and by historically more recent post-quantum complexity theories.

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  • Technological unemployment: Educating for the fourth industrial revolution

    Peters, Michael A. (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This paper reviews recent the concerns and discussion about technological unemployment focusing on the trope “the robots are coming” and beginning with reference to the World Summit (2015) devoted to the issue. There is consensus that robots and big data systems will disrupt labor markets, kill jobs and cause social inequalities. The paper examines Klaus Schwab’s concept of the “Fourth Industrial Revolution” – a concept that underlied the recent Davos meeting to inquire about the role of education in an age of automated cognition. Keywords: Technological unemployment, robotization, job displacement, fourth industrial revolution, automated cognition, post-industrial education

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  • Social capital and the budgeting process

    Frost, Denise Margaret (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Waikato

    This thesis arose out of a previous study of budgeting practices carried out at a not-for-profit church. This initial study had found that relationships played an important role in budgeting practices. Interviewees carried out their budgetary tasks in a cooperative, sometimes sacrificial manner. This relationship-based approach to budgeting was inconsistent with conventional approaches to budgeting. It became apparent that budgeting practices in this church could be explained by social capital theory, and that budgeting could be viewed as a social phenomenon. I began to question whether considering budgeting as a social process might also apply to profit-orientated organisations. As part of this thesis, I approached two different for-profit organisations: an entertainment centre; and, a science testing laboratory. Along with the church examined previously, both of these organisations agreed to participate in this investigation into the social aspects of their budgeting processes. An interpretive methodology was adopted to study budgeting practices from the viewpoint of managers. Social capital was a sensitising theoretical perspective, and was viewed as a ‘skeletal theory’; in particular, I was drawn to a model of social capital proposed by Nahapiet and Ghoshal (1998). Nahapiet and Ghoshal’s (1998) social capital framework was chosen as it was pertinent to examining the influence of social capital on the budgeting process. It came as a surprise to find that elements of Nahapiet and Ghoshal’s framework were in evidence in all three organisations. In the three case study organisations, budgeting was found to be a social process which can be explained by social capital theory. In contrast to the beyond budgeting proponents, who claim budgeting is redundant, this thesis has found that the budgeting process constitutes an investment of managers’ time and energy, because it encourages and promotes social capital. The budgeting process brought managers together to work cooperatively towards a commonly understood goal. Budgeting encouraged social interaction and fostered relationship building. Organisational norms and values were reinforced. Despite the differences between the three organisations, the common feature was that the budgeting process encouraged and reinforced social capital. This thesis has implications for other researchers. It provides a new insight into budgeting. It contributes to the qualitative budgeting literature by providing a contemporary view of the way social forces influence the budgeting process. It advances the literature on church budgeting. It adds to the social capital literature by adapting Nahapiet and Ghoshal’s (1998) framework of social capital to a context not previously studied – the budgeting process. There are implications for policymakers involved in setting budget-related policy in organisations, and for practitioners, as this thesis highlights the importance of the social side of the budgeting process.

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  • Ecopolitical philosophy, education and grassroots democracy: The "return" of Murray Bookchin (and John Dewey?)

    Peters, Michael A. (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article traces the “return” of Murray Bookchin whose work has been championed by Abdullah Öcalan, one of the founding members and leaders of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (Partiya Karkerên Kurdistanê, PKK). Bookchin’s “Democratic Confederalism” serves as a vehicle for taking seriously the notion of the local assembly within a broad non-state framework with an emphasis on inclusiveness and especially women’s rights. Öcalan and the PKK have adopted Bookchin’s social ecology as the basis for the new society. This article examines Bookchin’s “return” in the light of these developments and examines grassroots or participatory democracy as the basis of ecopolitical philosophy and comments on some strong parallels with John Dewey’s “creative democracy.”

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  • Noosphere rising: Internet-based collective intelligence, creative labour, and social production

    Peters, Michael A.; Reveley, James (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Our article relocates the debate about creative labour to the terrain of peer-to-peer interneting as the paradigmatic form of nonmarket - social - production. From Yann Moulier Boutang we take the point that creative labour is immaterial; it is expressed through people connected by the internet. Drawing on two social systems thinkers, Francis Heylighen and Wolfgang Hofkirchner, we transpose this connectedness up to a conception of creative labour as a supra-individual collective intelligence. This intelligence, we argue, is one of the internets emergent properties. We then present a model of internet development that flags the potential of digitally-evoked collective intelligence to facilitate what the Marxist philosopher George Caffentzis calls postcapitalist commoning. Yoking together systems theorizing about the internet and socialist envisioning of social transformation, we identify two sets of internet tools for coordination that can assist with the convivial reconstruction of society along the lines of peer-based production.

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  • Disciplinary technologies and the school in the epcoh of digital reason: Revisiting discipline and punish after 40 years

    Peters, Michael A. (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Foucault’s masterpiece Discipline and Punish (1975) provided a gene- alogical analysis of the prison as a model for the disciplinary society that displaces the liberal juridico-political theory of sovereignty with a new kind of disciplinary power exemplified by Bentham’s panopticum. This article revisits Foucault’s classic as a basis for examining it significance for school in the epoch of digital reason.

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  • The Video Journal and visual pedagogies: in the age of visual cultures [Editorial]

    White, Elizabeth Jayne; Peters, Michael A. (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Michael Peters and Jayne White introduce their thinking behind the development of the journal at the inaugural conference of the Association for Visual Pedagogies in Zagreb, June, 2016. They set the scene and pohilosophical parameters for a broad and forward-looking interpretation of visuality and the rise of visual studies by establishing an expanded route for the location of video Pedagogies in educational spaces. The video journal is introduced as a third generation form of scientific communication after the print-based journal and the digital online journal. The concept of the journal as the cornerstone of the scientific enterprise has evolved as new media technologies have become available. Industrial media known for its broadcast functionality of one to the many now is being replaced and remediated with video and mixed media increasingly with an accent on responsiveness and interactivity. In the second part of the presentation forms of visuality are explored and new visualization methodologies are discussed. An agenda is established for the potential and possibilities for Video Journal for Education and Pedagogy as a theoretical, philosophical, sociological, methodological and pedagogical site for future scholarship.

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  • New Zealand meets South Korea: Strategies for film co-productions between two countries

    Kim, JuHee (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Waikato

    This study investigates the state of international film co-productions between New Zealand and South Korea and whether such co-productions are possible, and if so, which modes or types of film co-productions are likely to succeed. The study is framed in the context of the two countries as well as the rapidly changing global marketplace. Increasingly, international film co-productions have gained importance in the film industry paralleling a growing tendency towards cross-border filmmaking. However, the phenomenon of international film co-productions, specifically between New Zealand and South Korea, has not been fully investigated to date. A review of existing approaches to international film co-productions did not provide a sufficiently comprehensive theoretical framework for this study. It therefore draws on four different approaches: political economy, social exchange theory (the reciprocal exchange model), Cultural Studies (focusing on cultural proximity and discount), and transnational approaches. Post-positivism provides a theoretical research perspective and the research method employed was a mixed-methods. The secondary data was analysed and discussed for the two governments’ film policies and their impact on the co-productions of these two countries. Extensive in-depth interviews with key respondents point five influential factors (political, economic, personal, cultural and industrial) for New Zealand-South Korean film co-productions. A case study of The Warrior’s Way (2010) was undertaken in order to examine how these five factors have practically impacted on one example of international film co-production. This study proposes a conceptual framework drawing upon four approaches to explore multi-layered and multifaceted international film co-productions, and each approach in the framework has made its own contributions to film studies in the academic literature. The findings of this thesis show that it has been difficult for official productions between these countries to happen despite the film agreement between them. Consequently, it is suggested that the option of undertaking unofficial film co-productions is a better one. Three modes for unofficial productions, particularly addressed to those South Korean filmmakers who desire to make New Zealand-South Korean co-productions are suggested.

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  • Pandora’s box down-under: origins and numbers of mustelids transported to New Zealand for biological control of rabbits

    King, Carolyn M. (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This paper describes one of the world’s first large-scale experiments in biological control of a major vertebrate pest of agriculture, which was tried in New Zealand during the second half of the nineteenth century. Starting from the late 1860s, pasture damage in Southland and Otago by European rabbits was causing serious reductions in productivity of sheep (wool clip and lambing percentages) associated with malnutrition of the breeding ewes, and a consequent decline in the value of pastoral land. In response, and despite repeated local and international warnings, ferrets, stoats and weasels (Mustela furo, M. erminea and M. nivalis) were liberated on the worst of the rabbit-infested pastures. They were perceived as the ‘natural enemies of the rabbit’ but (unlike foxes) too small to threaten lambs. Over the 50 years after 1870, upwards of 75,000 ferrets, most imported from Australia or locally bred, were released in the South Island. Over the decade 1883–1892, at least 7838 stoats and weasels arrived from Britain. At least 25 shipments are known, with an average of only 10% mortality per shipment. Of the 3585 animals listed by species, 73% were weasels. The total cost of the ferret programme cannot now be estimated; that of stoats and weasels alone was at least £5441, probably twice that, or >$NZ 1–2 million in today’s money. Mustelids (and cats) killed many young rabbits, which was helpful because rates of change in rabbit populations are sensitive to variations in juvenile mortality, but in the most rabbit-prone semi-arid lands, mustelids could not remove enough rabbits to prevent the continuing damage to sheep pastures. The era of deliberate introductions of mustelids to control rabbits in New Zealand was short, expensive, and unsuccessful.

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  • The audacity of Trump: How he won and what we missed

    Steff, Reuben (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Donald Trump made a number of key strategic decisions during his election campaign. Contrary to the common view that his campaign was marked by incompetence and dysfunction, there is considerable evidence that he made adroit decisions at key times. These were overlooked and dismissed by his political opponents to their ultimate disadvantage and defeat. If the Democratic Party hopes to take back the White House in four years' time, and the wider world wants to understand the 'Trump phenomenon', it is imperative that we look at the logical thread that underlies Trump's seemingly irrational behaviour.

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  • Game changer competition

    Steff, Reuben (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    An increasingly complex arms competition is underway between the United States, Russia and China. While the United States is in the lead across a range of current and emerging systems, it can no longer take its position for granted, and there is an urgent need for greater attention to be paid to this competition as the strategic consequences are unknown. Further more, an opportunity exists for countries like New Zealand to seize the initiative and play a role in advancing arms control programmes that promote collective reassurance and will enhance international security.

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