2,302 results for Unitec Research Bank

  • Simplified method to forecast loss of land and water table changes due to sea level rise caused by climate change

    Li, Jiannan; De Costa, Gregory; Phillips, David (2016-08)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    It is well known that climate change is causing sea levels to change worldwide. This sea level increase is causing loss of land and changes to water table in coastal zones. There are sophisticated models such as ARCGIS, FEEFLOW etc. to model and accurately calculate the changes occurring in these areas. In order to use these models one requires good quality data sets coupled with experienced modellers which is at times sparse and hard to source. Therefore here in this research a simplified method is proposed to estimate the changes occurring in these areas. Initially sea level changes were projected using linear regression method. Changes to land and water table in Wellington New Zealand were simulated, modelled and a simple model was developed using this data to estimate changes. The model was validated using a different data set series. This model could now be used to easily estimate the changes to ground water and land loss in other coastal zones, particularly where data is sparse and technical knowhow on modelling is limited, which is generally the case in most areas.

    View record details
  • Application of floating vegetative pads (FVP) to improve stormwater quality : a pilot scale study

    Yu, Ronald; Mahmood, Babar; De Costa, Gregory; Phillips, David (2016-08)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Henderson Creek contributes one of the largest load of sediments & heavy metals (e.g. Copper - Cu and Zinc - Zn) into the Central Waitemata Harbour, Auckland. Cu and Zn particles do not decompose so they are persistent, accumulating on sediments, in filter-feeding shellfish and in plants, and therefore, aquatic health is affected by turbidity and that degrades stormwater pond ecosystem. It is the one of the key item of the Auckland City Council agenda to reduce Cu and Zn in urban storm water detention ponds in order to protect & improve the aquatic ecosystems’ health of stormwater ponds in Auckland Region. A mesocosm study was conducted at Unitec to investigate the performance of Floating Vegetative Pads (FVP, planted with native plants) in terms of their ability to remove heavy metals, particularly, Cu and Zn and the particulates from the storm water detention pond in Hilwell Drive, Henderson. The eight treatments were compared in this experiment i.e. a floating polystyrene pad on its own (treatment G), a floating polystyrene pad with artificial roots (treatment H), and six floating polystyrene pads with six different native plant species (i.e. ApodasmiaSimilis – treatment A, Deschampsia Caespitosa - treatment B, FiniciaNodosa - treatment C, Hierocloe Redolens - treatment D, Lachnagrostis Billardierei - treatment E, PoaAnceps Blue - treatment F) in six individual buckets). Storm water samples were collected in the buckets from the studied pond, and then analysed for pH, Cu and Zn. Plant growth of the six native plants used in this experiment were measured by an increase in their wet mass from the start (day 0) until the end of experiment i.e. day 21. Among all the treatments, B and E treatments removed total Cu (i.e. both dissolved and particulate forms - mg) by 30%. Treatment B and F removed the most total Zn (Zn both in dissolved and particulate forms) by 60% and 50%, respectively. It is not clear why treatment D ended up with more Cu and Zn as compared to the initial values, and this requires further investigation. Although the treatments G and H (i.e. without and with artificial roots) removed Cu and Zn by 20%. The study showed that treatment E had almost 60% increases in wet mass (i.e. increased from 98.5 to 157.5 g/d). The pH of all treatments except treatment G reduced from 7.35 to 6.45. The drop in pH levels could be due to the bacterial activity happening in the rhizosphere, which releases rhizo deposits and that can drop pH.The treatments E and F had the most area daily Cu-mass removal rates i.e. 0.074 and 0.082 mg/m2/d (i.e. 7.4 and 8.2 mg/100 m2/d), respectively. Whereas, treatment B performed well in terms areal daily Zn-mass removal rate of 0.496 mg/m2/d (i.e. 49.6 mg/100 m2/d).

    View record details
  • Enhancing educational success through Talanoa : a framework for the Pacific

    Prescott, James; Fua, Seu’ula Johansson (2016-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Talanoa is a traditional means of oral communication common to the Island nations of the Pacific. This paper introduces a framework for alleviating student success and retention at early childhood education, primary and secondary schools for Pacific students learning in a social context outside of their own culture. The framework is based on traditional talanoa as a research tool and methodology. In particular, the paper discusses the application talanoa as part of the assessment process, curriculum development, teaching and learning, and evaluation. The proposed framework draws on the experiences and design of the Te Kotahitanga project introduced in New Zealand in 2001 and will be relevant to the ongoing aim to improve educational success and retention among Pacific students. Given the discussions draw on experience in New Zealand over the past twenty years, it will be of particular relevance to local policy developers.

    View record details
  • Flat tax in New Zealand : unemployment and social security taxes 1930-70

    Rankin, Keith (2016-06)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    With the concept of a Universal Basic Income (UBI) being mooted this year as an important reform that can facilitate our adaption to a flexible work-world characterised by short-term contracts, inequality and automation, it becomes instructive to investigate historical precedents. In particular, unconditional income (including negative income tax) solutions are linked – at least in economists' minds – to a flatter (if not flat, ie proportional) income tax structure. The practical reconceptualisation and reform of income tax and benefits that I would argue for is indeed a proportional income tax, initially set at 33 percent, coupled with a minimum publicly-sourced personal credit set initially at $175 per week ($9,080 per year).1 Such a 'basic income flat tax' schema adapts easily to New Zealand's present tax and benefits levels, and will be affordable in the near future if not already. It would allow many people – especially young people – on benefits, student allowances or low wages to bypass the Work and Income bureaucracy and get on with their lives, leaving Work and Income to focus on addressing specific needs and deprivation, and allowing sole parents to benefit directly from Child Support agreements or impositions. In this paper I investigate the flat (sometimes 'flattish') income tax that existed, under various names, between 1930 and 1970. Initially an 'unemployment tax' (the mainstay of an Unemployment Fund), in 1936 it was repackaged as an 'employment promotion tax'. Then in 1938 it was boosted and further repackaged as a 'social security tax' (with its associated Social Security Fund). From the outset, the social security tax came to be closely associated in the public mind with the universal superannuation benefit that commenced in 1940 at a modest £10 ($20) per year. This new benefit co-existed with the means-tested age-benefit, then £78 per year. The mechanism set in the 1938 Social Security Act was that the superannuation benefit would increase by £2.5 each year until it reached the level of the age-benefit, at which point the universal superannuation would displace the age-benefit for persons over 65. However, there was no explicit provision for inflation-indexing in the legislation. Inflation had not been a problem in the 1920s and 1930s, but would become so from the 1940s and most of all in the 1950s.

    View record details
  • Harnessing potential : trade educators and the transformation of a workforce

    Maurice-Takerei, Lisa (2016-08)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Transforming the educational and training workforce Incumbent on organisations and industry to ensure that there is a teaching workforce that has …. Educator knowledge and skills enhances educator agency and the ability to support the development of a flexible, knowledgeable, skilled and adaptable workforce engaged in continuous learning

    View record details
  • What to do about student selection for social work programmes?

    Hughes, Catherine; McNabb, David; Ashley, Paul (2016-11)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Research project: *This paper is a precursor to a research project being undertaken by the authors which is focused on the Aotearoa New Zealand (ANZ) context – A single school case study from Unitec *Multivariate analysis of scores achieved during selection processes by different groups of applicants *Selection scores will be examined in relation to eventual student success *Second article will report on the findings.

    View record details
  • How to play when you don't know all the rules

    Gambolati, Rob (2016-07)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    It is widely discussed that physical education is missed out on in primary schools because of a lack of confidence and/or competence in teachers. Fortunately the current curriculum promotes five key competencies that teachers can use to put students at the front of physical education.

    View record details
  • CSWEANZ : fit & proper survey results

    Hughes, Catherine; Staniforth, Barbara; Adamson, Carole; Hancox, John; McNabb, David (2016-11)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    [2nd slide] Your feedback is important as it will assist us to: 1. Gain a picture of the processes that Schools of Social Work currently use in selection processes and declining applications, as well as ongoing assessment of fit and proper criteria within programmes. 2. Identify the fit and proper issues that emerge for Schools of Social Work. 3. Assist in the preparation of a report for CSWEANZ that will enable Schools to develop a shared understanding of the issues and to participate and contribute to national debate and development. Part ONE of the survey relates to the process of assessing fit and proper criteria on selection of candidates. Part TWO identifies the formal processes your institute engages throughout the four years of social work programme to manage academic performance and disciplinary processes. Part THREE examines the embedded processes of assessment for fit and proper criteria used within the degree.

    View record details
  • Programming around the jewels : threshold concepts in physical education

    McCall, Nichola; McKay, Anne; Thompson, Kylie (2016-07)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    How did we end up here? Wanted to think differently about course design – What is a ‘physically educated’ student? Concerned about an over-reliance on standards for course design Curiosity around scholarship (esp. students not taking PE) Pancake effect in interdisciplinary environments Concern that students physical education discipline knowledge is often siloed. Today we hope to: EXPLORE threshold concepts in PE together And CONSIDER the use of threshold concepts in senior PE course design

    View record details
  • The effectiveness of a commercially available bird repellent on house sparrows (Passer domesticus)

    Cameron, Kristie; Adams, N. J.; Wassenaar, R. J.; Bistricer, A.; Brown, K. J.; Halliday, A. D.; Lodge-Osborn, K. R.; Robson, E. A.; Jones, Graham; Salinsky, Jodi; Fraser, Diane (2016-07)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Aim: Identify a robust method for assessing the efficacy of an odour repellent to the sparrow in aviary studies Use this method in field studies to isolate the effects of the repellent on sparrow behaviour

    View record details
  • Goldfinger revisited. James Bond set designs by Ken Adam as modernist spaces of power

    Schnoor, Christoph; Wilson, Scott (2016-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Ken Adam (b. 1921) developed set designs for seven of the early James Bond films and a number of other important works. Goldfinger (1964) is among the most famous of these films, and Adam’s designs have since made film and design history, featuring in a number of influential exhibitions and publications. Adam’s life as an exiled German Jew, who studied architecture in London and who flew for the RAF during the Second World War, means, as Petra Kissling-Koch’s suggests in her exploration of Adam’s work, that these designed spaces of (evil) power as the hideouts of Bond’s antagonists can be understood directly in relation to Adam’s historical context and biography. This paper offers a close examination of Adam’s designs, paying particular attention to the development of the Bond series through Dr No, Goldfinger and You Only Live Twice, and the ways in which Adam’s work makes visible a historically and contextually informed relationship between architecture, power and the representation of evil. While the cinematic representations of the spaces of evil – especially in the Bond franchise – evolve and alter over time, Adam’s work is important for, at least, two reasons: First, Adam’s designs concretely associate in popular culture the relationship between modernist architecture and specific articulations of power. Second, Adam’s designs foreground set design as a site of narrative detail, rather than merely being the place within which the narrative occurs. While these monumental sets were designed to function within an ‘evil’ role and therefore use an architectural language already associated with specific articulations of power, Adam’s set designs also make visible a version of modernist architecture that was attractive and which may have strongly influenced the general public’s perception of modern architecture. Adam’s promotion of modernist architecture through the medium of film establishes a template for the representation of the spaces of power within the spy genre that are, themselves, so powerful that they quickly become the de-facto blueprint for subsequent representations.

    View record details
  • Mapping the potential range of the brown marmorated stink bug in New Zealand

    Aguilar, Glenn; Fraser, Diane; Kumar, Shivani (2016-07)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Aim and Objectives: Predict the suitability of New Zealand to the BMSB Ensemble the predictions of best performing Species Distribution Modelling algorithms using worldwide occurrence of BMSB and environmental data Project the model into New Zealand using current and future climate scenarios

    View record details
  • License to play? : New Zealand youth articulates its cultural identity through play with East Asian popular culture

    Kolesova, Elena (2016-06)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Questions to consider: The question is how global, or in this context North East Asian popular culture, contributes towards local articulations of New Zealand cultural identity? Why do some New Zealand youth choose to consume East Asian popular culture at all? What does this consumption really mean? Is the discourse of East Asian popular culture is still relevant in this context?

    View record details
  • Old and New Media in the Pacific Islands : synergies, challenges and potential

    Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Cass, Philip; Matbob, Patrick (2016-07)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    The Pacific Islands region contains very diverse geographic, socio-cultural, political and communication ecologies. Each country has its own unique challenges and opportunities related to communication flows, systems and practices. With growing social media presence in the region, Facebook and, to some degree, Twitter have become sources of information for journalists during natural disasters. Recent studies though have indicated that ICTs are becoming more relevant, and indeed are underutilised for development despite presenting significant potential. Four case studies from the Pacific Cook Islands Tonga Fiji Papua New Guinea

    View record details
  • Dirty old town

    Ramsay, Kyle (2016)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This research project set out to answer the question stated on page 6: can an architectural proposition provide a connection between a city’s iconic natural assets and enhance a real and metaphorical sense of place? To effectively answer this question, an approach was taken to approach the project with a design, research, design approach. That is, a dual approach of both personal design and investigation of already established architectural literature along with precedent projects would assist in reaching an acceptable solution, from both an academic and a personal perspective. Early in the project, it became apparent after examining several built projects that the primary focus of the project would be one of urban design. While the subject of urban design has a wealth of literature available, it is still a relatively contentious subject in terms of both architecture and wider planning. That is because as a discipline it involves so many different variables that it is hard to pigeonhole under one profession’s umbrella. However, it is these complexities that make it much more interesting and, because of its holistic nature, more varied and rewarding outcomes are achievable. What’s more, in order to understand an urban issue that much more effectively, a full analysis of the scope of the project must be done. That is, not just architectural knowledge should be canvassed, but historical, social, environmental and economic information needs to be evaluated in order to reach a more definitive conclusion. Therefore, a review of existing knowledge of the discipline and those built projects that have a specific correlation to that of the overarching parameters of this project was completed in conjunction with more location-specific knowledge-gathering. These investigations included analysis of the current urban form of the place in an attempt to establish an architectural solution, which then in itself, highlighted several issues resulting from the past 50-odd years of poor city planning and development. Thus, can a (single) architectural proposition provide the aforementioned connection and enhance sense of place? In effect, no. That is, without perhaps creating something that in itself becomes overly complex and out of context with the urban design theory investigated for this project. However, a series of architectural interventions with a broad focus on achieving a connection that references academic, built best practice and coalesces with existing urban context should provide suitable illumination for a solution or solutions to the above mentioned issues. And if designed primarily with people in mind, it should, with luck, enable the question to be answered effectively. Project sites: The Rivermouth, Huatoki Plaza, Huatoki Square/Piazza, Huaktoki Riverside.

    View record details
  • Keeping working to keep working : staying in the workforce with a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease

    Brittenden, Elissa (2016)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Background: Parkinson’s disease has a profound effect on those with the condition. Due to earlier diagnosis from improved diagnostic techniques as well as advances in medication, people are often able to continue to work for many years after diagnosis. This study sought to discuss the experience of a small group of people in New Zealand with Parkinson’s disease who continue to work after diagnosis. Aim: To explore the experience of staying in the workforce after a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease. Design: A qualitative study using interpretive description. Methods: Five participants were recruited through purposive sampling via word of mouth and an advertisement placed in the Parkinson’s New Zealand newsletter. Data were collected by semi-structured interviews and analysed thematically. Findings: Three themes were identified: ‘participating in work’, ‘trying to reinvent’ and ‘bridging past and future’. Each interwove into an overarching theme of ‘working to work’ in that participants still wished to participate in work but in order to do this had to make adaptations and use strategies to ensure work could continue. They faced an uncertain future and spoke of their past while looking forward with hesitation. Conclusion: The data revealed that working remained an important part of participants’ lives after a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease. In order to keep working they made adaptations to their lives so this could continue in a way they wanted.

    View record details
  • Exploring the impact of online political activism on political processes in Kazakhstan : the Zhanaozen uprising

    Beisembayeva, Dila (2016)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    In recent years social media attracted a lot of scholarly attention but exploring social media in a particular geographical locations was rather slow. The impact of social media on political, social and economic processes in Kazakhstan has not been explored yet. This thesis presents empirical findings of a research examining the use of social networking sites amongst Kazakhstanis during the uprising in the rich-oil town of Zhanaozen on 16 December 2011. It is guided by the main research question that looks at ”What impact does online political participation have on political processes in Kazakhstan?” This research provides a preliminary and exploratory analysis of how two blogging platforms: Yvision and LiveJournal serve as a foundation for the political and socially involved Kazakhstanis, and how in turn, this could have an effect on the political process in the post-soviet authoritarian state of Kazakhstan. This research applied a two-stage content analysis of messages posted on the blogging platforms (Yvision and LiveJournal) and in the two national newspapers Kazakhstanskaya Pravda and Golos Respubliki and in its online version – Respublika portal. In both instances, the period of six months was covered: from 16 December of 2011 when the uprising took place until May of 2012 when the first trials of the protesters began. Such a specific timeframe was chosen as this research focuses on the representation of the uprising both in the traditional forms of media as well as online and the consequences it had on political participation in Kazakhstan. Data is collected via non-participatory technique with a non-random sample selection process that allows focusing on the events of 2011 in Zhanaozen. Research findings demonstrated in the light of the uprising, online political activism does have an impact on political participation in Kazakhstan. Although Kazakhstanis are generally quite apolitical, such a tragic event served as a catalyst in raising political awareness and online media provided a platform for exploring this. However, not only did the authoritarian government prevented Kazakhstanis from being more politically involved by applying “just-in-time” censorship techniques, the existing digital gap prevented the majority of Kazakhstani to go online and participate in the online debate. Findings have also indicated that the crisis in Zhanaozen highlighted the long-standing problems with ethnic return migration as well as national and ethnic identity amongst Kazakhs. This thesis contributes to existing research on how political activism online can provide support for political activism online and impact the governing bodies. It also establishes a foundation for future studies on Kazakhstan and impact social media and activism has on it.

    View record details
  • Further down the track

    Pauling, Craig (2016)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Research question: Can the restructuring of a traffic corridor in Auckland positively contribute towards resolving existing issues surrounding transport and density in the locality? Policies to allow Auckland to sprawl continue to dominate strategic planning and are, therefore, counterproductive to planning for public transport, placing people at the extremities of the city and stretching the public transport network over great distances, making it expensive and unreliable. Years of suburban sprawl have resulted in spread out communities, reliant on the private motor vehicle. Car parking takes up large sections of land at a time when the price of land is rising faster than ever before, acting as pedestrian moats surrounding malls and other amenities while people are sittng through hours of traffic, travelling further and further each day trying to balance the cost of living versus the costs of travel. This project investigates Auckland’s density and growth around the focus of the private motor vehicle and looks at the current plan to solve traffic problems, the other proposed alternatives and how these could be used to get Auckland moving again. It will look at the principles of density and transport and how they can be aligned to assist each other and how the current transport corridors of the city can be used to achieve this. The scheme looks at one of Auckland’s major transportation corridors, Dominion Road, and the effect that an upgrade to the public transport network would have. It looks at a series of locations for transport interventions to have the greatest impact on the corridor for the city. It examines, in more detail, the implementation of one of the interventions and the effect and opportunities that are created in the surrounding urban area due to this. Project site: Dominion Road, Auckland, New Zealand.

    View record details
  • Analysing and identifying website personality by extending existing libraries

    Chishti, Shafquat Ali (2016)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Previously, website personality was only assessed and classified by human interaction. This brings with it a host of problems as humans act depending on their likes and dislikes. For example, if someone likes the particular colour of a website he will classify it as attractive but if he does not like the particular colour he will deem the web site unattractive. To remove these sorts of problems that come with the aspect of human bias, an impartial decision maker is needed. As every living thing that has a mind of its own will have some biases, a machine, more specifically a computer, is the best option. A computer can analyse and categorise website personality on the basis of quantitative elements of the website. Hence, a software tool needs to be developed to assess and classify website personality. Experiment has been carried out for the research using a software tool. The software tool that I have developed is designed to work on the same lines as the Website Personality Scale research done by human beings, which involved classification of website personalities by research and surveys. The only difference is that of the human bias, which is removed by using the software tool. K-means algorithm is used in the tool to classify a website on the basis of the data collected from website pages. To train the software tool a website data bank was made which contained 240 websites; 112 new websites were tested on the developed software tool, with positive results showing how close results from a test website are to the training websites. The tool can successfully identify and analyse a website and classify it with similar training websites from the data bank. The whole process is fast and automatic without the need for any human involvement.

    View record details
  • The effect of osteopathic intervention and corrective exercise on golf performance : a prospective case series

    Miles, Joshua Ian William (2016)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    BACKGROUND: The clinical approach used in the following case series is a newly emergent treatment concept (Performance Therapy) in manual therapy that combines active exercise with passive manual therapy in sporting participants. Performance therapy fits into the coach, athlete and practitioner triad whereby the practitioner attempts to address dysfunctional movements in an attempt to improve athletic performance and prevent injury. Golfers may receive benefit in this new clinical approach by being guided through tailored intervention programs that are targeting dysfunctional movements affecting golf specific physiological characteristics. AIM: To demonstrate the use of combining active therapy (corrective exercise) with passive therapy approaches (osteopathic manual therapy/management) for the purpose of improving golfing performance (club head speed and Driving distance (DD)) over an 8-week period. METHODS: Five prospective case studies were undertaken. Each participant underwent a needs assessment in order to develop a tailored intervention program combining corrective exercise and osteopathic manual therapy for the purpose of improving club head speed and DD. A Selective Functional Movement Assessment was measured every week. FlightScope® analysis of golfing performance was assessed for both 5- iron and driver pre and post-intervention (club head speed, ball speed, carry distance, total distance, launch angle, flight time and SMASH factor). RESULTS: One participant withdrew from the study. Two participants showed improvement for club head speed for 5-iron (Cohen’s d= 3.52, d= 1.43). One participant showed significant improvements in total DD for 5-iron (d = 1.2) and Driver (d = 2.1), while one showed improvements in carry distance for driver only (d = 1.09) and one showed improvements in total DD (d = 0.52). One participant showed no changes in DD for the 5-iron (d = -0.43) and driver (d = 0.11). No golf related injuries occurred during the course of the study. CONCLUSION: The clinical approach demonstrated in this study (combined osteopathic manual therapy and corrective exercise) has shown potential for improving golfing performance. Golfers who are searching for improvements in golfing performance should assess their balance abilities and squat biomechanics. Golfers can receive benefits from receiving tailored management programs from a manual therapist in order to improve dysfunctional movements that may be restricting their golf swing. Further clinical and research development of the Performance Therapy concept in golf is necessary.

    View record details