37 results for Honours Dissertation

  • 'Black Diamond City' a history of Kaitangata mines, miners and community 1860-1913

    Bamford, Tony (1982)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Coal mining is an industry about which people have held and still hold a number of misconceptions. Much of this fact lies purely in lack of understanding for it seems coal mines have always been shunned by the wider community. Isolation however is perhaps an aid to historical analysis for curiosity often prompted investigation even if many of the views expressed were still prejudiced. Similarly, miners, as a group, tended to operate outside the normal social realms of neighbouring societies. But although similarities existed between coal mining communities in a number of areas such as occupational patterns and basic institutions associated with the industry, these settlements cannot be lumped into one basket. Coal mining towns were as different from one another as any non-mining settlements were different from others. This thesis is concerned with such differences. It is concerned also with the pattern of development of such a town. The community, industry and group of people under observation is that of a small town of Kaitangata.[…] Kaitangata was one of the earliest mining settlements in New Zealand, and developed into Otago and Southlands largest coal mine. It had become firmly established by 1880 as a major industry, so that by the turn of the century Kaitangata had become a very permanent settlement, exhibiting quite ‘normal’ demographic characteristics.[…] [Extract from Introduction]

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  • Characterisation of gold mineralisation and geophysical aided geological mapping in the Old Man Range, Central Otago, New Zealand

    Stephens, Samuel (2014)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Six structurally controlled gold deposits are hosted within two different structural blocks in the Old Man Range area. The mineralised lodes are hosted in normal faults which cut steeply across the host schistosity. In the East structural block, mineralised faults and the prominent joint set strike northwest and cut steeply across greenschist facies TZ III Caples Terrane schist. In the West structural block, mineralised faults and prominent joint sets strike eastwest and cut steeply across upper-greenschist facies TZ IV Wanaka lithologic association schist. These structural blocks are separated by the regional scale Old Man Fault. Orientation of hard rock gold deposits is closely linked to the prominent joints in host schist surrounding the deposits. Mineralised lodes formed along -1 m wide normal fault zones. They are discontinuous but can be traced for up to - l 50m, with variable thickness along strike. The lodes comprise brecciated silicified schist and hydrothermal quartz breccia, and minor quartz veins with abundant arsenopyrite. Open cavities with euhedral quartz crystals are common. Euhedral arsenopyrite occurs in quartz and silicified schist clasts within mineralised zones. Gold occurs as micro-particulate blebs in partly oxidised arsenopyrite, and as coarser free grains within quartz, micaceous laminae, micro-faults, and micro-shears within mineralised rock. Hydrothermal alteration is minor, comprises addition of Si, Au and As, and extends only a few centimetres from the mineralised lodes. Mineralisation may have occurred within a few kilometres of the surface during mid-Late Cretaceous extension (-106-lOlMa), with estimated formation temperatures between 200-350°C. The mineralised structures within the Old Man Range area are similar to other shallow level, post-metamorphic Otago gold deposits. Magnetic, magnetite bearing greenschist has a high magnetic response and can be successfully mapped using total magnetic intensity surveys over the Old Man Range area. Electromagnetic (EM) surveys can be used successfully to map post-metamorphic faults within the Old Man Range area, where they show up as linear conductive anomalies. These geophysical surveys are a useful tool for geologic mapping. However, there is no direct link between the geophysical features and gold mineralisation within the Old Man Range.

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  • Soil water regimes of the Glendhu experimental catchments

    Miller, Blair J. (1994)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    The Otago block mountains are important water supply areas with their abundant water yield attributed to conservative water use by narrow-leaved snow tussock (Chionochloa rigida), the dominant vegetation cover of the region. This study looks at three aspects of the soil hydrology of the Glendhu experimental catchments, east Otago, New Zealand: soil water regime changes following afforestation of the tussock grasslands; a comparison of soil water regimes with topographic position in order to identify possible saturated overland flow generation sites; and some characteristics of a peat wetland that is typical of those that occupy gullies in the region. Several sites were set up in the forested and the tussock catchments, and depending on position, contained tensiometer nests, neutron probe access tubes and water table observation wells. Data were collected betw.een 29/3/93 and 19/5/94 and revealed much drier conditions under forest cover, with saturation not occurring in the A horizon throughout the study period. Using tussock catchment sites for topographic comparison, a downslope increase in water content was found on the interfluve, while saturation persisted for longer periods of time at headwall sites where subsurface convergence resulting from the concave planar morphology occurs. Wetland water tables only fluctuated 27.5 cm during the study period, and do not appear to be sustaining the high baseflow that occurs from the catchment.

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  • Social change and the state : the emergence of a benefit for unmarried mothers in New Zealand

    Elworthy, Sam (1988)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    In 1973 the Labour government introduced a statutory benefit for unmarried mothers, separated and divorced women. It was called the Domestic Purposes Benefit (DPB). Although unmarried mothers were only one group covered by the benefit, constituting around 20% of the total recipients […] the granting of a benefit to these women in particular raises some interesting issues. For centuries unmarried mothers have been stigmatised, being perceived as a threat to the two parent family and traditional bans on sexual activity outside marriage. The granting of a beneift to these women would seem to point to significant changes in social attitudes, especially with regard to sex, marriage and the family.[…] All too often apparently humanitarian gestures seem to have ensured, remarkably well, the stability of capitalist society. But what about the benefit for unmarried mothers? If the introduction of the Domestic Purposes Benefit had any social effects at all they would appear to have been dysfunctional. By instituting a benefit the government gave public sanction to women bearing ex-nuptial children and raising them on their own, even though this practice did seem to threaten the universality of the married two parent family. While applauding the development of a benefit for unmarried mothers I could not understand why a government would introduce it. This problem is the central subject of the essay. [Extract from Introduction]

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  • Have your cake and eat it too : the treatment of contemporaneous relationships under the Property (Relationships) Act 1976

    Reid, Adrianne Nicola (2007)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Although it is clear from the Act that a person can be in more than one qualifying relationship at a time, the courts have shown themselves to be reluctant to recognise contemporaneous relationships as falling within the ambit of the Act. Because of this, contemporaneous relationships will only be recognised where it is abundantly clear that the parties are living together as a couple. Sections 52A and 52B are designed to divide property between relationships, and do not override the usual rules governing the division of relationship property between the partners in a relationship. Sections 52A and 52B will apply after the court finds that the relationship property of contemporaneous relationships overlap, and they will only apply to those pieces of property which are found to be relationship property of both relationships. The first limb of the rule in sections 52A and 52B will be redundant as all property that is relationship property of a relationship is attributable to that relationship. Property which is relationship property of both relationships will be divided between the relationships in accordance with their respective contributions to its acquisition. Sections 52A and 52B work to the advantage of the common partner, leaving them with half of the total relationship property. Because sections 52A and 52B only apply if the court has made findings in respect of each relationship, it is to the advantage of the common partner to litigate both disputes simultaneously, rather than undergo successive settlements with each partner. Sections 52A and 52B can also be used to manipulate the outcome where only one of the relationships has ended, or, in the case of the common partners' death, where one of the partners has an interest in retaining as much of the relationship property as possible between themselves and the deceased common partners estate. Given the difficulties in applying sections 52A and 52B, and their fairly arbitrary outcome, they would be better replaced with an unambiguous provision which allocated specified shares to the relationships on a more objective basis. [Extract from Introduction]

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  • "Its OK, it's all right, oh yeah" : the 'Dunedin sound'? : an aspect of alternative music in New Zealand 1978-1985

    Robertson, Craig (1991)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    "A Long Essay presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) degree in History"

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  • Otago 17 - Southland 11 : a social history of Otago rugby in the 1940s

    Lynch, Anthony (1984)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Sport plays a special role in New Zealand society, and one sport, rugby, dominates all others in terms or time, interest and participation. The 'national game' has helped to shape New Zealanders' perceptions or themselves, and the feats or the All Blacks have assisted the formulation of national identity. New Zealanders take pride in their prowess in this physically demanding game, and every Saturday in winter thousands turn out to participate in the game, as players or spectators. This interest is reflected in the great number or accounts or teams, games and trophies, and yet surprisingly little has been written about the role rugby has played in society. This long essay looks at what rugby meant for the people or Otago in the 1940s. In the history or rugby in the province, the 1940s were probably the most interesting and certainly the most important decade. It could be divided into two distinct periods; the war years and the Shield era. Between 1939 and 1945, New Zealand was involved in a major war, and this had an impact on sport as it did every other facet or New Zealand life. The first chapter will look at the impact or the war on the rugby in the province, and at the response or the ORFU, the clubs and the players to the difficulties or wartime rugby. The other important, and distinct, period in the 1940s was the 'Shield Era', when for three glorious years the province held the symbol or national rugby supremacy, the Ranfurly Shield. Otago was at its most formidable in 1948, its centennial year, and the final chapter looks at this period and its significance for the province. During the war years, rugby at the club level was most important, for there were few representative games played. But in the Shield era, Carisbrook hosted a feast of representative football, and all attention focused on the Otago team and its achievements. These two periods were very different because of this, and yet there was much that remained the same. These elements have been incorporated in the middle chapters. The first two look at those who were most actively involved in the game, the players, and the coaches and administrators. The latter two chapters regard the rituals that surrounded the game and were followed by the players and spectators. In writing a social history of rugby in the 1940s one great advantage has been the ability to use oral sources. Oral evidence adds life and vigour to the history of a lively and vigorous game, and where possible I have tried to reproduce this evidence, rather than that of newspapers or minutes, in the text. In conducting the interview I followed the procedure set out in Paul Thompson's The Voice of the Past, and then each interview was transcribed in full. Where possible, evidence was checked against documented sources (mostly newspapers). The 'Saturday' chapter in particular has drawn largely on oral sources, and so perhaps this best of all gives an insight into what the game meant for these men, and the many thousands like them. In all, I have tried not to lose sight of the game itself. As D. Smith and G. Williams in their fine work Fields of Praise noted, the game has too often emerged only as an illustration of something else that was going on in the real world; the intrinsic value of the game's history and the interlocking aspects with 'the real world' have not been appreciated.

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  • Pushing past the confines of femininity : music for women in Dunedin, 1907-1950 : a vehicle for agency, recognition and social connections

    Deuchrass, Andrea (2001)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Music is a form of self-expression, community or national culture, political voice and ethnic identity, among many other things. This dissertation examines the way that music can be a central influence to life for women, in a social structure encompassing the factors of gender and femininity, socio-economics and to a lesser extent, ethnicity. Music can provide a livelihood, form of (small) income and a way of making social connections in a sphere that can function both in and out of the home. It is also an activity where people often cross social boundaries. I have chosen to examine the extent to which music gave women agency, social acceptance and enjoyment in the Otago district from 1907 to 1950.

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  • The declaration of inconsistency with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990

    Curran , Chris (2001)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Section 2(4) of the Criminal Justice Amendment Act (No 2) 1999 is incompatible with the cardinal tenets of a liberal democracy. This Court would be compromising its judicial function if it did not alert Parliament in the strongest possible manner to the constitutional privation of this provision. The arrival of the declaration of inconsistency in Moonen v Film and Literature Board of Review was quite remarkable. There was nothing in the legislative history nor the terms of the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 (NZBORA) that explicitly furnished the courts with the jurisdiction to declare that certain statutory limitations of rights are inconsistent with the Act. Concerns were immediately raised about the feasibility and constitutional propriety of the new remedy. The Court of Appeal's traditionally liberal approach to the NZBORA appeared to have led it into error. It will be argued in this paper, however, that the declaration is both a legitimate and practical development. The new remedy promises to augment the democratic processes protecting human rights, facilitate transnational and domestic institutional dialogues on the nature of such rights, and promote a climate of rights-based justification and accountability for state action. Chapter 1 inquires into the significance of the declaration. The nature of the declaration is outlined, and its current legal status considered. The impact of the declaration is then briefly traversed in terms of its implications for the law of remedies, the NZBORA, the constitution, and New Zealand jurisprudence. Chapter 2 then questions whether the declaration is truly a surprising development. In this regard, the legal pedigree of the declaration, the context of expanding NZBORA remedies and the UK statutory analogue are all discussed. Chapter 3 begins the analysis of the legitimacy of the declaration. The inquiry first assesses the fit between the declaration and the broader NZBORA framework. The constitutional relationship between Parliament and the courts then provides a major yardstick in this legitimacy analysis. Democratic objections to the declaration and the possible benefits of a new constitutional order are discussed. Finally, the ramifications of the declaration for the international human rights system are assessed. Chapter 4 concludes the paper by considering the methodology of declaration decision-making. It looks to Canada for guidance in appraising the legitimacy and competency of such decisions, and discerns lessons regarding the employment of appropriate legal and procedural methods in this regard. The final procedural issue discussed is the question of standing. The two dominant standing standards are thus evaluated against the requirements of declaration decisionmaking and the nature of the declaration itself.

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  • Archaeology and Shell Adzes in Prehistoric Oceania: A Revised Methodological Approach to the Descriptive Analysis of a Solomon Islands Collection

    Radclyffe, Charles (2015-12-09)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    This dissertation examines archaeological study of shell adzes in the Pacific. It provides a critical review of archaeological methodology and terminology used in descriptive analysis of this artefact class. It raises important problems that are hindering this subject including a lack of clarity and conformity in the selection of criteria used to describe shell adzes, ambiguity in nomenclature, and the restricted capacity of existing criteria to accommodate a wide range of morphological variation of these artefacts. In addition, it argues that archaeologists have focused almost exclusively on describing typological variation for culture historical purposes. This is problematic as it has resulted in the neglect of a wider range of issues important in shell adze study, specifically technology, function and ecology. A revised methodology is proposed to address these problems and is applied in the descriptive analysis of two collections of shell adzes from Solomon Islands: one stored at the Otago Museum in Dunedin, New Zealand and the other at Solomon Islands National Museum in Honiara, Solomon Islands. The morphological and metric characteristics of the different shell adze varieties is described, as well as evidence of manufacturing processes involved in their creation. The findings of this analysis are then discussed in relation to their implications for broadening shell adze analysis by incorporating technological, functional and ecological issues. Problems encountered in the analysis are highlighted, and recommendations are made to further develop methodology in shell adze analysis.

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  • Land management change and conflict resolution in Abel Tasman National Park, 1855-1995

    Moran, Amanda K. (1995)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Societal change begins when the perceptions of an individual or a group are altered. A change in perception can lead to conflict if not all members of a society hold the new belief at the same time. This study looks at how the resulting conflict can be resolved, particularly in relation to changes in land management. Conflict in land management is rooted in interactions between people, and between people and their environment. In New Zealand an important cause of conflict is related to the development of National Parks. There are two main issues within this: (1) The development of National Parks involves a change in land use from private to public. (2) For some, the sole purpose of a National Park is environmental protection while others see recreation as important. These differing views lead to the need for continuing debate as the patterns of landuse change. Through this debate we can resolve the more immediate areas of concern in terms of land management while remaining aware that there will be new issues in the future that require further consideration. The aim of this study is to look at these areas of concern and related issues in relation to changing land management practices and conflict resolution in Abel Tasman National Park (ATNP) over a 140 year period: from 1855 to 1995. Prior to the formation of ATNP people would talk about "going down the Bay" as the area did not have an official name (Moncreiff 1965). For convenience the name ATNP will be used to describe the area over the entire period of this study, although the Park proper was not gazetted until 1942.

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  • Disrupting the binary: a space for gender diversity

    Harris, Kathryn (2015)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    It is by now almost self-­‐evident that binary models of the highly nuanced concept of gender are at best incomplete, and limit understanding of the diversity of gender expression. In this work, I summarise and critique standard models of gender. I discuss three broad approaches to gender: biological, social and biosocial. A central problem inherent in these approaches is that they almost always revert to a form of binary discourse — even as they critique such an approach — because the fundamental understanding of gender is rooted in discrete classifications. Drawing on theoretical discourse from prominent theorists, I explore an alternative approach to gender classifications and experiences. I suggest that new approaches and alternate models are needed to express ideas and data of gender more inclusively and with greater accuracy. This work includes my research and discussion of a gender spectrum as represented by a colour-­‐wheel. I introduce the Colour-­‐ Wheel of Gender Diversity and its practical applications. Exploration of diversity and its implications in both the personal realm and the social are essential in the quest to move towards ideals of fairness and equality. I believe that it is important to problem-­‐solve issues of non-­‐representation that cause oppression in our society and to enable legitimate understandings of a continuum of gendered realities.

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  • Maori prisoners in Dunedin, 1869-1872 and 1879-1881 : exiled for a cause

    Reeves, Jane (1989)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    The exile of Maori prisoners to Dunedin in 1869 and again in 1879, was due to the Northern wars and the confiscation of land in Taranaki by the Government. Maori never accepted the 'justice' imposed on them and active resistance to the confiscations continued throughout the 1860's, 1870's and 1880's. The first group of prisoners to reach Dunedin were Pakakohe men who had been allied with Titokowaru and his armed resistance to the confiscations. The second group were from Parihaka, they also resisted the land alienation, but passively. This dissertation addresses the reasons for the Government's imprisonment of Taranaki Maori, and it examines the legislation passed in 1879-80. It also concentrates on the general experiences of the prisoners in Dunedin. These include the work they were involved in, living conditions and health, and finally the relationships that were formed between the prisoners and Otakou Maori. I have not explored the political and religious philosophies of Titokowaru or Te Whiti, nor have I delved into the experiences of Maori prisoners exiled in Wellington, Lyttleton, Hokitika or Ripapa Island. Therefore, this dissertation is an introduction to a larger subject, and one that deserves extensive research. Part of the research included oral history. However in exploring the use of such a resource I also discovered the special demands that it places onto the researcher, and the restrictions that a time limit imposes. To do justice to oral sources, several years’ research would be required. The scarcity of information on some aspects of the study also imposed limitations and has had some effect on the structure of the essay. Much of the available information is non-specific and does not differentiate Maori prisoners from Pakeha prisoners. The study has therefore included an element of conjecture.

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  • Geology of the Gladstone peak area, Takitimu mountains, western Southland, New Zealand

    Scott, Graeme L. (1974)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Volcanogenic sediments of the Lower Permian Takitimu Group into the Gladstone Peak area are mapped and sub-divided into seven lithofacies. Some of the lithofacies indicate a shallow marine near shore environment, others indicate subaqueous and possibly subaerial pyroclastic flows. These volcanic sediments are cut by dykes, sills and plugs of predominantly basaltic composition and by a small diorite intrusion. The origin of the diorite intrusion is attributed to fractional crystallisation and flow differentiation. Six rocks have been chemically analysed and their geochemistry is examined. Some of the component oxides (SiO2, Fe2O3, CaO, Na2O) in the volcanic rocks have been remobilized, redistributed and deposited elsewhere as authigenic minerals. The Takitimu Group rocks and intrusives have been metamorphosed to Zeolite facies and probably Prehnite-Pumpellyite facies in a low pressure type II terrain. There is a contact metamorphic aureole around the diorite intrusion. Some of the zeolites present would appear to require alkaline, mildly saline ground waters, relatively low activity of H2O, low chemical potential of CO2 and a relatively high temperature (ca. 250°C) for their formation. The metamorphism is similar to that which prevails in the Tanzawa Mountains, Japan where the geothermal gradient is inferred to have been between 40-60°C/km. The area is part of the Princhester Fault Block (new name) which is itself block faulted. It is likely that the dykes have intruded these Permian block faults. The strata in the Gladstone Peak area were later tilted. They characteristically dip gently toward the South-East and are interrupted by minor faults and cross-cutting veins.

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  • The Chemistry and Photochemistry of the Insecticide Carbaryl in Aquatic Environments

    Brown, Jeff (1991)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Large quantities of pesticides have been used for many years in New Zealand to control agricultural and horticultural pests. The fate of a pesticide after application as a powder or solution to the target organism depends on its chemical structure and mode of application. Once in the environment, it may degrade by any number of physical, chemical or biological mechanisms. The time scale for this degradation can span from hours to years and the degradation products may be as toxic, if not more, than the parent molecule. Thus pesticides may become ‘xenbiotic’ pollutants and eventually have adverse effects not only in the environment but they may also bioaccumulate in the food chain and even ultimately affect humans. One of the common degradation pathways of many chemical species ion the environment is via sunlight-induced photochemistry either in the solid state or in solution. The aim of this project was to examine this degradation pathway for solutions of a pesticide in common usage in New Zealand. It was hoped that the results from this study would provide some indication of the relative importance of sunlight as a method of pesticide degradation. In the New Zealand environment, a significant fraction of all pesticides are ultimately washed off the target plants and organisms to form solutions in natural aquatic environments, such as streams, rivers, lakes and coastal estuaries. […] In this study, detection methods were first developed for carbaryl , 1-naphthol and 1-naphtholate based on the fluorescence of these species. The hydrolysis of carbaryl and the degradation of 1-naphthol plus 1-naphtholate were then investigated under typical water pH conditions (8.2) in the absence of light and microorganisms. Photolysis equipment was developed to study the photochemical degradation of carbaryl and 1-naphthol in aqueous solution under various conditions and a comparison made with the results for degradation in the absense of light. [Extract from Introduction]

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  • Good faith bargaining in New Zealand: A study of its development and likely practical application

    Horne, Stuart (1995)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: 89pp. Notes: University of Otago department: Law.

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  • Fatality in Cocteau's La machine infernale

    Davies, Ellen (1998)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Physical description: 45 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm. "This Research Essay, prepared under the supervision of Dr Roy M. Dineen, is submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the University of Otago for the degree of Bachelor of Arts with Honours in French." Thesis (B.A. (Hons.))--University of Otago, 1999. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • "Square girls" : Prostitutes and prostitution in Dunedin in the 1880s

    Lucas, E Heather (1985)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    The study of prostitutes and prostitution in New Zealand has usually been subordinate to a more general analysis of women and crime. As prostitutes were, and still are, regarded as criminals in New Zealand, this has been a valid approach. However, prostitution was a particular sort of crime, in that it was essentially a crime against middle class morality. As a consequence, a study of prostitution, in itself, not only allows a fuller appreciation of the nature and extent ,of prostitution in New Zealand, but also an insight into the social structure and attitudes pertaining to sexuality and morality in colonial New Zealand. [extract from Introduction]

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  • Deep Heat: An Experimental Analysis of Ovenstones

    Gillies, Karl B (1979)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Acknowledgements INTRODUCTION PART 1: METHODS AND MATERIALS. 1.1: Choice of Site, Construction and Ignition of Ovens; 1.2: Selection of Ovenstones; 1.3: Oven Monitoring; 1.4: Stone Assessment. PART 2: RESULTS. 2.1: Oven Temperature Graphs; 2.2: Heat Retention Differences Per Size and Type; 2.3: Shattered Stone Percentage Graphs; 2.4: Lithology of Fired Stones; 2.5: Typical Fracture Patterns. PART 3: DISCUSSION. 3.1: Experimental Sources of Error; 3.2: The Ovens and Their Food; 3.3: The Ovenstones. PART 4: CONCLUSIONS. PART 5: APPENDIX. Thermal Conductivity Graphs from Sutton’s BA Hons. Dissertation 1971. PART 6: SOURCES CONSULTED.

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  • Attitudes in New Zealand to Scandinavian immigration, 1870-1876

    Grigg, A R (1973)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: vi, 125 leaves ; 30 cm. Notes: Bibliography: l. 120-125.

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