16,812 results for Masters

  • The Impact of Digital Platforms on New Zealand Firms’ Entry Strategies: The Case of Alibaba

    Jin, Huijun

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The advent of digital platforms has changed the way in which Asia-Pacific firms conduct international transactions, condensing time and geographic distance (Manyika, Lund, & Bughin, 2016). However, the impact of digital platforms on firms’ internationalisation strategy, and in particular entry strategy, is under-researched in current International Business literature. This study aims to explore how digital platforms in China, and specifically the digital platforms of Alibaba Group, impact New Zealand small and medium-sized (SMEs) companies’ entry strategies in the Chinese market. Empirical data were collected from four New Zealand companies through semi-structured in-depth interviews. The results of this study suggest that digital platforms impact these firms’ entry strategies through easing entry barriers to some extent, particularly in helping overcome resource constraints and obtain access to networks. However, the participating firms still required local staff as a key part of successful market entry. Therefore, it is concluded that while digital platforms can help alleviate some entry barriers traditionally faced by SMEs, limitations in human resources still impose challenges on firms in seeking internationalisation in China.

    View record details
  • Development and Examination of In-browser GPU Accelerated Cryptography

    Win, Dajne

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Many of us use encryption frequently whether realising it or not; it is the active yet often invisible element keeping our information and data safe. Despite this, many of us underestimate the value of encryption in our daily lives. Schneier (2016) explains encryption is instrumental in protecting identities, governments, lawmakers, law enforcement, military, critical infrastructure, communications networks, power grids, transportation, and everything else we rely on in society. “As we move to the Internet of Things ... encryption will become even more critical to our personal and national security” (Schneier, 2016). Understanding the ever-changing threat landscape, predicting potential trends, and current security issues are the core roles of the security researcher. The process of establishing frameworks helps mitigate risks of the critical reliance on encryption. One of the challenges encryption faces is it is inherently computationally intensive and therefore slow. Due to mobile devices' focus on performance over security, it is vital to find methods to accelerate modern encryption algorithms to preserve information security in the future. Previous research has successfully investigated the use of hardware to accelerate encryption algorithms. Algorithm accelerators have used Graphics Processing Units (GPU) for many years and have proven these to be effective for parallel workloads. An advantage is that GPUs are already part of most computer systems, making them a fertile area for research into hardware performance. However, previous research has been limited to system specific compiled code. This research explores the ability to perform acceleration on any modern browser through a scripted programming language. The selection of NTRUEncrypt for this experiment was due to its suitability towards acceleration, protection against quantum computers and as an alternative to RSA or Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC). A pure JavaScript and GPU accelerated version of NTRUEncrypt were developed. The Three.js library was selected to utilise the latest version of WebGL in modern browsers and reduce development time. OpenGL ES 1.0 compatible shaders then replaced the addition and convolution operations of NTRUEncrypt, utilising the system GPU for processing. Performance comparison of encryption and decryption between NTRUEncrypt.js and NTRUEncrypt-GPU.js was then performed. Polynomial convolution at the highest security settings was 1.6 times faster on the GPU compared to the Central Processing Unit (CPU). However, results from this experiment show NTRUEncrypt-GPU.js failed to accelerate the NTRUEncrypt cryptographic algorithm. Furthermore, comparisons within this research showed JavaScript was up to 80 times slower than C, C++, and Java. Future research into accelerated cryptography would provide further knowledge, understanding and open new opportunities for improvement to information security. While NTRUEncrypt-GPU.js failed to accelerated NTRUEncrypt using currently available standards, preliminary testing using Compute Shaders proved successful and warrents further investigation.

    View record details
  • Talanoa ile i'a : talking to Pacific Island young people in West Auckland about health : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Social Work at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

    Faleolo, Moses Ma'alo (2003)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The present study explores the health issues surrounding Pacific Island youth health development. The present study conducted a literature review on youth health issues in New Zealand and found that most are cultural and social related. A second literature review of theoretical dispositions to account for the emergence of youth heath issues found that Pacific Island concepts, medical sociology theory and youth health theory were relevant explanations for the emergence of Pacific Island youth health issues. The present study conducted focus groups with Pacific Island young people about youth health issues to see if the information from the literature review corresponded with the participants’ responses and whether the theoretical explanations were consistent with the participants’ responses. The present study found that a correlation exists between the literature review and the participants’ responses. The present study maintains through the participants’ responses that the key to addressing Pacific Island young people health issues is to involve their families throughout the process of assessment and in the development of response plans. This means the perspectives of those in youth health policy arenas, the perspective of service managers and the perspective of professionals are required to recognise that the perspective of the young person is an essential domain for understanding the cause of and for resolving Pacific Island youth health issues. ‘Talanoa ile I’a’ is the story of Pacific Island young people living in West Auckland. It is based on responses to questions posed to participants of the study in relation to Pacific Island youth health development issues. The present study contends that in order to understand, identify and resolve Pacific Island youth health issues it is important to talk to Pacific Island young people themselves. The present study did not conduct any research with youth policymakers, youth health services or health professionals but preferred to explore youth health with Pacific Island young people themselves. The present study is built on the participants’ responses and provides both warning signs and building blocks for youth health policy, youth healthcare services and youth health professionals. The present study is a Pacific Island approach to Pacific Island youth health issues; it is ‘by Pacific for Pacific’.

    View record details
  • Anthropogenic Influences on the Sedimentary Evolution of the Coromandel Harbour

    Harpur, Alexander (2016)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The Coromandel Harbour is located on the eastern side of the Coromandel Peninsula, North Island, New Zealand. To date, sedimentological research conducted in the harbour has been confined to nearshore areas, with limited data existing for the subtidal regions of the harbour. The primary aim of this thesis is to identify whether and how various human activities in the catchment have altered harbour-wide, intertidal and subtidal, sedimentation rates and sediment geochemistry. A secondary aim is to identify the sedimentary evolution of the whole Coromandel Harbour over broad time scales (i.e. thousands of years). Sedimentological data has been collected from 17 intertidal and subtidal sediment cores. Cores have been analysed for down-core changes in sediment texture, mineralogy, observational characteristics and geochemistry measured through portable X-ray fluorescence (pXRF). A facies model constructed from this data has been used to interpret the sedimentary development of the harbour. Pre-human and anthropogenic sediment accumulation rates (SARs) have been estimated using radiocarbon dating, qualitative pollen analysis and facies analysis. Anthropogenic heavy metals have been interpreted against pre-human baselines to identify influences on natural contaminant levels, with specific values compared with regional contaminant guidelines to assess ecological threats. Deeply weathered soils developed in a subaerial environment somewhere between the last interglacial at c.120 ka and the extended last glacial maximum (eLGM) at 29 ka. These soils were overtopped by streambank and floodplain deposits at the eLGM to the onset of the mid-Holocene sea level rise at c.7500 cal yr B.P. As sea level rose, inundated eLGM and early estuarine sediments were initially pyritised in a stratified, restricted marine setting. Over time, sea level rose and the stratification of the harbour was destroyed, ceasing pyritisation. Streams began to rapidly aggrade at the harbour with the positive change in base level, giving early estuarine (c.7500-5000 cal yr B.P) subtidal SARs of ~0.31-0.45 mm/yr. As streams reached stable profiles, SARs decreased to generally conformable rates of 0.25-0.47 mm/yr in the intertidal regions and ~0.1-0.25 mm/yr in the subtidal regions during the pre-Polynesian phase (c.7500-700 cal yr B.P). Polynesian SARs (700-130 cal yr B.P) decreased to ~0.05-0.13 mm/yr. Whole European (1820 A.D-present) SARs in the northern parts of the harbour are ~0.52-0.77 mm/yr and appear to be chiefly related to mining and deforestation. Recent European (1975 A.D-present) SARs are ~3.52-10.37 mm/yr in the southern parts of the harbour and are chiefly related to pine plantation erosion. A secondary depocentre for pine plantation sediments appears to be at the inlet where rates of ~4.98 mm/yr occur. Only arsenic and mercury exist over Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council (ANZECC) Interim Sediment Quality Guidelines (ISQG) Low concentrations in anthropogenic sediments analysed. Maximum harbour-wide arsenic concentrations of up to 33.5 mg/kg that exceed the ISQG-Low value of 20 mg/kg are associated with mining related sediments near the Whangarahi Stream mouth. Maximum arsenic concentrations in pine plantation sediments is 22.3 mg/kg. Mercury may also exceed ISQG-Low/High values throughout all harbour sediments, though it is unclear whether mercury has been incorrectly measured by pXRF.

    View record details
  • Exploring the development potential of Saudi Arabian Airlines, the national flag carrier of Saudi Arabia : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Aviation at Massey University, (Manawatu), New Zealand

    Gamraoyi, Khaled (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis will examine the possible factors that could greatly influence the future development of the legacy carrier of Saudi Arabia: Saudi Arabian Airlines. Furthermore, this thesis delved into the feasibility of a new route from Jeddah to Auckland and how this route could impact the growth of Saudi Arabian Airlines. The research questions were answered through the use of a mixed method approach. The research was carried out in two phases. The first phase involved environmental scanning through the process of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis, where the strengths and weaknesses of the internal environment of Saudi Arabian Airlines were appraised. It also examined the possible opportunities and threats of the external environment (i.e. the Middle East region), where Saudi Arabian Airlines is situated. The second phase involved a survey where the feasibility of a new route (i.e. Jeddah–Bali–Auckland) was examined and evaluated. The results suggested that the exponential growth of the aviation industry in the Middle East can be capitalized by Saudi Arabian Airlines by using its recognized strengths and addressing the concerns that have emerged in this study. A possible strategy by which these concerns can be addressed is through establishing a new route that Saudi Arabian Airlines can take advantage of in the future to fulfil its ambitions of becoming one of the top airlines in the aviation industry. One specific route that the thesis examines is the Jeddah–Bali–Auckland route, where there is a substantial market which will yield an increased profit margin and therefore impact the growth of Saudi Arabian Airlines.

    View record details
  • The recovery experiences of refugees from Middle Eastern backgrounds with concussions : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Psychology at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

    Zaytoun, Ruba (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    With the growing number of Middle Eastern refugees in the world, there is a need for more culturally and refugee specific research to examine the ongoing and idiosyncratic nature of the stress and trauma refugees’ experience. As a result of the arduous journeys refugees undergo, they become susceptible to a number of mental and physical illnesses, including Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) such as concussions. Little research so far has been dedicated to understanding Middle Eastern refugees’ experiences of TBI and how understandings of this injury can impact on their journeys to recovery. In this small Australian, community-based, qualitative study six individuals from Middle Eastern refugee backgrounds, who have experienced a concussion in the past five years were interviewed. Participants included two females and four males, aged from mid 20s to early 60s. The interviews focused on participants’ conceptualisation of concussions and their experience of recovery. Interview data was investigated through the Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) lens. Six main themes emerged from interview data, these related to: Coping, consequences of injury, professional relationships, conception of brain and brain injuries, refugee related experiences, and experiences of concussion. All participants stressed the importance of family as a source of support in coping with consequences of injury. Faith in a higher power was highlighted as a core value in Arabic Middle Eastern cultures, common in most interviewee accounts. One source of distress in some participants was the worry that others will perceive them as having mental illness as a consequence of their concussion. Future research is encouraged to examine the stigma underlying mental illness in the Middle East, and the obstacles preventing people with similar backgrounds from seeking help.

    View record details
  • Inhibitors to the Organisational Adoption of Gamification

    Jefferies, Dannette Louise (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    This study looks at how organisations can use technology to engage, motivate, and reward staff by embedding game-like elements into business applications and processes through a phenomenon called gamification. Gamification is an emerging phenomenon that has the potential to increase engagement, productivity and performance in organisations. It is the convergence of motivation theory, information systems, and the rise of digital communications systems. Gamification has been trending academically since 2010, and appears to support the human drivers of motivation and engagement through the appeal of both intrinsic and extrinsic rewards. Yet, while gamification appears to be a solution to the issues surrounding employee motivation, there is little documented evidence of successful enterprise integrations. Gamification may be the modern elixir to all that ails organisations as they struggle to attract, nurture and retain talented employees. However, if this is the case, then why are gamified practises not widely adopted by companies? Twelve participants were interviewed for this qualitative study. The first three participants work in software organisations that have first-hand experience with gamified product and process development. Next, a further nine participants were interviewed, three in the broadly-defined communications industry, three in finance, and one each in real estate, retail sales, and manufacturing. These participants were selected as potential users of gamification within an organisational context. The grounded theory methodology is used to explore the inhibitors to gamification techniques in organisations. Data collection strategies included in-depth interviews and grounded theory methodology techniques are used for data analysis. This study found the adoption of gamification in organisations is largely inhibited by the infancy of the gamification industry as the availability of gamified platforms, and the demand from organisations is relatively low. It is expected that gamification will become more mainstream in the future as an applied business practice. Voluntariness is a critical factor within any managerial initiatives aimed at cultivating positive employee attitudes and experiences at work. The concept of employee consent includes mandatory fun events such as companywide social events as well as gamification systems. The original contributions to knowledge of this thesis include two conceptual models. The first draws on an existing model for game design and proposes that employee engagement is an emergent property of an open gamification system. Emerging from the combination of mechanics and dynamics creating an aesthetic experience that meets the motivational needs of employees and thereby evokes an emotional commitment to the organisation and furthermore, it motivates employees to focus on shared organisational and individuals’ goals. The second conceptual model draws on Hofstede’s organisational culture dimensions framework and posits that there may be a specific cultural pattern for organisations best suited for effective gamification. This study finds organisations with cultures that are goal-oriented; externally driven; easy-going work discipline; local; open systems; and have an employee orientation, are more likely to find gamification is an appropriate fit for their organisation. In addition, this thesis distinguishes between gamification and organisational gamification and offers a unique definition for gamification implemented within organisations, which has been purposefully and strategically implemented.

    View record details
  • Volcanology of the basaltic lava succession within the Auckland pit of the Bombay Quarry, Bombay Volcanic Complex, South Auckland Volcanic Field

    Kapasi, Aliasgar (2016)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The South Auckland Volcanic Field (SAVF), which was active 1.59 – 0.51 million years ago and comprises around 82 volcanic centres, represents a complete history of a monogenetic field preserved in the geological record. The Auckland pit in the Bombay Quarry was recently exposed, revealing an infilled palaeovalley of volcanic and sedimentary deposits possibly associated with the nearby Bombay Volcanic Complex. A set of vertical drill cores from across the quarry were available for this study. The stratigraphy of the volcanic and sedimentary deposits and the facies architecture were examined and described from the drill cores available, and a set of stratigraphic logs were produced. Volcanic and sedimentary units identified were: basement Waitemata and Tauranga group sediments, three individual ponded basalt lavas with intercalated scoria and Quaternary alluvium and/or Kauroa ash deposits. Facies identified include: moderately vesicular basalt (A.1), vesicular basalt with vesicle trails (A.2), non-vesicular basalt (A.3), poorly vesicular basalt (A.4), scoria deposit (B), scoriaceous basalt (C) and intercalated silt/clay (D). Petrographic characteristics were analysed by optical microscopy, which show that all three basalt lavas have minerals comprising: olivine and clinopyroxene phenocrysts, and a groundmass of plagioclase, opaques and mafic minerals, however, the proportions of each mineral vary between samples. Olivine, clinopyroxene and plagioclase elemental compositions for each of the three basalt units were determined by electron microprobe analysis and revealed that the middle basalt had relatively lower proportion of Mg- and Ca-rich minerals compared to the upper and lower basalts. Furthermore, mineral compositions were consistent with the broad group B rock type of the SAVF lavas. Bulk-rock geochemical characteristics were analysed by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry where the basalt samples were classified as basanites and ne-hawaiites. The lower and upper basalts have a relatively wide range of major and trace element compositions; whereas, the middle basalt has less variation. The three basalt lava flows represent pahoehoe and/or transitional lava flows, which occurred during magmatic eruptions separated by periods of volcanic quiescence represented by Quaternary alluvium and/or Kauroa ash deposits. The magma source beneath the Bombay area reveals that it consists of dominantly a garnet-bearing peridotite source where only group B type lavas were erupted over time. This process indicates a polygenetic-like eruption history within a monogenetic field, which may be an ideal analogue for understanding the future of shield volcanism in the South Auckland and Auckland Volcanic Field.

    View record details
  • Foreign Affairs in a Native Context: The Significance of Foreign Relations on Thomas Jefferson's Native American Views

    Berry, Shane (2016)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    There has been considerable research into Native American history in recent times, with much analysis of what transpired in the early years of the United States, and how events from the late 18th and early 19th centuries have impacted on the Native Americans. As a prominent figure, Thomas Jefferson made decisions that undoubtedly affected the Native tribes, yet his Native American ideas have not received as much attention from scholars as his thinking about most other topics. Most literature that has been produced which relates to Jefferson’s attitudes about Native Americans, has not considered adequately the importance that foreign relations played in shaping his thinking. The purpose of this study is to examine the significance of foreign affairs on Jefferson’s views about Native Americans, and to determine whether foreign affairs was a critical factor in influencing his plans for the Native Americans. To ascertain the importance of foreign relations in shaping Jefferson’s thinking about the Native Americans, an exploration of his writing was conducted, in which all documents that fell within the scope of this research project were analysed, and all relevant material used in this thesis. The documents used for this study were found online in the Jefferson Papers at the United States National Archives. Findings from this study clearly show that foreign relations had a major impact on Jefferson’s thinking about the Native Americans. The two predominant themes that emerged from his writing were conflict and land; foreign affairs primarily influenced Jefferson’s views in relation to these topics. Because of the prominence of these themes, they were chosen as the focus of the two chapters for this thesis. Within the themes of conflict and land, the affect that foreign relations had on Jefferson’s thinking is evident on a number of issues. He believed that most of the conflict with the Native Americans occurred because of the interference of foreign agents. The impact of foreign affairs can be seen in Jefferson’s views about trade with the Native Americans, and his thoughts on agriculture were clearly shaped by concerns about other nations. The influence of foreign relations is unmistakeable in Jefferson’s thoughts about national security, and its effect can also be seen in the development of his ideas about Native American removal. Findings from this thesis add depth to an important factor that shaped Jefferson’s thinking, and help in gaining an understanding of his decision making regarding the Native American.

    View record details
  • Recording and Tracking Design Decisions in Interactive System Development

    Yang, Wanying (2016)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Experience economy is prompting the innovation of traditional product design. The design concept - "user-centered design" has received wide recognition. In the face of many professional or non-professional users, the priority of interaction design is to ensure the usability of the interactive product, and then a good user experience of the product. The user interface is an intermediary between human and computer. Users exchange information with the computer via the user interface. The user interface is an important part of a computer system. It is a big part of the software development. The quality of the user interface directly affects the performance of the software. For most users, the user interface is all they know from a product. So for these users, a program with a good interior design but a bad user interface design is a bad program. In this project we investigate different ways of recording design decisions in interactive system development which may allow us to think of the different variants and alternatives that are possible (within a design space) in some formal notation, which then allows us to either reason about their suitability or record the decisions made to understand the impact of decisions and how well they support the given criteria. The goal of this project will involve finding out what the influences are which help drive the design process; considering the effects of individual vs. team design; deciding how and when decisions occur; thinking about useful ways to record decisions and their influences; and investigating the usefulness of the approach through the working examples identified as case studies

    View record details
  • Stratigraphy, structure and geological history of mid-Cretaceous sedimentary rocks across the Torlesse-like/non Torlesse boundary in the Sawtooth Range-Coverham area, Marlborough.

    Ritchie, D. D. (1986)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis describes the geology of an approximately 100km2 area lying between the Clarence River and Kekerengu. The objectives were to determine the relationship of the "Torlesse-like" sawtooth Group to the late Early Cretaceous Coverham Group; to determine the relationship between the coeval Split Rock and Burnt Creek Formations within the Coverham Group; and to investigate the nature of Cretaceous events which led to the traditional differentiation into older Torlesse type "basement" and younger Cretaceous "cover". Geological mapping indicates the presence of three packets (Glencoe, Pikes and Coverham Blocks) of sedimentary rocks separated by the major Ouse and Pikes Faults. These packets comprise probable submarine fan flysch, massivE? sandstone, massive siltstone, acid tuffs and conglomerate of Sawtooth Group (Torlesse-like Urutawan - Motuan) unconformably overlain by probable slope basin flysch, massive siltstone, Inoceramus shellbed, and conglomerate of Coverham Group (non-Torlesse). The unconformity is most commonly angular but in a few places is a more subtle paraconformity. A further minor unconformity occurs at the base of the Ouse Member within the Split Rock Formation of the Coverham Group and is thought to reflect the presence of the growing Ouse Anticline. The Coverham Group rocks have similar Motuan - Teratan ages on each side of the Ouse Fault. The Split Rock Formation, previously used only for rocks in the middle Clarence Valley, has been extended to the Coverham area and used for rocks west of the Ouse Fault. The partly coeval Burnt Creek Formation east of the Ouse Fault was probably deposited some distance from the Split Rock Formation in a different basin separated by a structural high. They were juxtaposed by low angle reverse movement on the Fault in the Late Cretaceous. structural/deformation characteristics cannot be used as criteria for separating the Torlesse-like rocks from non-Torlesse rocks in the study area. It is dangerous to assume that 'Torlesseness' is a certain and particular state of deformation. Both the Torlesse (Sawtooth) and Coverham Group rocks exhibit a whole spectrum of deformation from 'broken formation' to more or less undisturbed beds. The pattern of deposition and deformation suggests an accretionary prism setting for these rocks. Sawtooth Group rocks are likely to represent 'younger' Pahau Terrane rocks which were deformed by a single intra-Motuan event either tectonic or perhaps a huge submarine slide, creating widespread unconformity between them and the Coverham Group slope deposits. Continuing instability is likely to have led to growing folds and further minor unconformities. The termination of the Rangitata Orogeny occurred in a progressive and evolutionary way representing a mid-Late Cretaceous change from a compressional subduction regime to a tensional rifting regime. Andesitic-rhyolitic volcanism was common in the late Early Cretaceous.

    View record details
  • Quantifying morphologic changes of a coastal foredune using a low-cost remotely piloted aerial system (RPAS)

    Moloney, Julia (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Mid-latitude sandy coasts are dynamic environments. Monitoring coastal morphodynamics is important for understanding the response of coasts to short-term storm events, for understanding the response of coasts to long-term environmental change, and for managing beach-dune systems. Remotely piloted aerial systems (RPAS) (or drones) present new opportunities for coastal monitoring. This type of platform is inexpensive, efficient, requires minimal expertise, and also provides high resolution aerial imagery. Photogrammetry can be used to derive digital surface models (DSMs) or digital terrain models (DTMs) from RPAS imagery. This thesis assesses the efficacy of low-cost RPAS for describing the morphology and morphodynamics of coastal foredunes. The first objective is to compare DSMs produced by RPAS surveying with DTMs derived using conventional survey methods. Objective two assesses the accuracy and precision of RPAS surveying to quantify morphologic changes of a coastal foredune. The third objective is to examine the influence of vegetation on RPAS-derived DSMs. Comparisons are made between total station, RTK-GPS, terrestrial laser scanner and RPAS surveys conducted on the St. Kilda beach foredune, Dunedin. The surveying methods are compared based on survey efficiency, cost, accuracy of the DTM/DSM, and their sensitivity to atmospheric and environmental limitations. RPAS photogrammetry is used to develop a time series of DSMs, which describe short-term patterns of sedimentation and morphological changes in the lee of this foredune. Vegetation surveys were conducted on the foredune at Mason Bay, Stewart Island, and the areas are classified as uniform and dense, variable, and sparse vegetation, or bare sand. Plots containing each class were surveyed with RPAS and RTK-GPS, to produce a DTM and a DSM that are compared to determine the elevation difference. The RPAS survey was the most efficient method for developing DSMs, even when considering the set-up and data processing time (Objective 1). The RPAS produced the second most precise surface, with a RMSE of 8 cm. The RPAS is more sensitive to environmental and atmospheric conditions; however, this method is very rapid, and undesirable weather conditions can be avoided. The results show there is un-modelled systematic error in the DSM caused by lens distortion, which increases outside the GCP network – areas outside the network were not used for subsequent analysis. Vegetation presence can prevent the derivation of accurate DTMs. The RPAS did not accurately quantify sand deposition due to the presence of vegetation (Objective 2). The sand dampened the vegetation, causing a decrease in elevation in the change model. The sensitivity of the RPAS to vegetation is insignificant in areas with bare or sparse vegetation, or when quantifying large-scale changes (for example, foredune erosion). Vegetation height, vegetation cover/density, GSD, the structural properties of the plant, and the surface spectral properties, were identified as factors causing an elevational offset in the DSM (Objective 3). The elevation of the areas with bare sand were statistically equal in the DTM and DSM, however, the dense, variable and sparsely vegetated areas were statistically different. The elevation difference between the DSM and DTM is the largest in the densely vegetated areas (30 cm). Low-cost RPAS are capable of achieving high-quality morphologic surveys of coastal foredunes. The method affords the advantages of efficiency and flexibility. However, due to the sensitivity of the method to vegetation, low-cost RGB RPAS are more suited to quantifying the morphology of bare sand or sparsely vegetated areas, quantifying large-scale changes, or for long-term morphologic monitoring. Low-cost RPAS are not capable of accurately quantifying small-scale changes in areas with dense vegetation. However, as RPAS platforms develop, it is expected that sensors capable of penetrating vegetation will become more accessible for low-cost platforms.

    View record details
  • The phenomenology of near-death experiences in Northland Māori of New Zealand : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Psychology at Massey University, Palmerston North Campus, Manawatū, New Zealand

    Young, Hannah Joy (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Near-death experiences (NDEs) can be described as profoundly life-changing, subjective events, that typically manifest in those who have been pronounced clinically dead. Over the past four decades, NDEs have been a field of interest for many researchers. However, the majority of NDE research has been conducted in Western contexts, with fewer than ten studies completed in non-Western regions (Sleutjes, Moreira-Almeida, & Greyson, 2014). The limited non-Western NDE research makes it difficult to determine the role culture may play in the development or interpretation of the NDE. The focus of the current study is the phenomenology of the NDEs of Maori residing in Northland, Aotearoa New Zealand. Because of the Maori focus, Kaupapa Maori Research was selected as the most appropriate methodological framework for this study. A ‘whanau of supervisors’ consisting of five Kaumatua and Kuia assisted the non-Maori researcher with respect to Kaupapa Maori. Six participants took part in unstructured interviews. Findings revealed the significant role of tikanga Maori within the NDEs of participants’, as well as a high similarity with the features often reported by NDErs of Western culture. Based on these results, it is suggested the two positions previous authors have regarded as conflicting, are not in fact mutually exclusive. The NDE may be cross-cultural in nature and culturally interpreted, but incorporate elements developed in reference to culture.

    View record details
  • Characterising landscape and sea level dynamics to predict shoreline responses over the next 100+ years in a high energy tectonic setting, Kaikoura, New Zealand

    Berger, Hannah Victoria (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis examines local scale landscape dynamics and coastal responses to climate change along the tectonically active, high energy Kaikoura coastline, South Island, New Zealand. In New Zealand, the majority of urban infrastructure is built along low-lying coastal plains. As a result, expanding coastal communities face increasing exposure to coastal hazards, which will potentially be exacerbated by climate change-induced adjustments in sediment supply, wave climates and sea levels, amongst other factors. Sea level around New Zealand has been predicted to rise between 0.8 m and 1.0 m by 2115 as a response to increasing global temperatures. In Kaikoura, local relative sea levels may vary from regional projections based on local sediment dynamics in response to; local tectonic uplift and co-seismic sediment delivery, increased rainfall and storm intensity, ocean climate and tides. Local sediment dynamics are important to consider when managing relative sea-level variations, in terms of assessing erosion response affected by sediment supply. New Zealand Coastal Policy Statement (NZCPS, 2010) Policy 24 states that the effects of climate change on coastal sediment dynamics should be factored into 100 year hazard risk assessments. To this date there has been no combined assessment on tectonic, climatic, and anthropogenic controls on local sediment dynamics, to predict mixed sand and gravel morphology response to future climate change and sea level variation along the Kaikoura coastline. The main objective of the research is to predict how coastal geomorphology in Kaikoura is likely to respond to local tectonic and climate change- induced adjustments in landscape and sea level dynamics over the next 100+ years. In order to fulfil the research objective, the primary focus of this research was developing a conceptual framework for the preliminary assessment of local sediment dynamics as part of a sea-level rise response matrix. The methodology was developed using a Kaikoura area case study, including the coast between the Hapuku and Kahutara Rivers, Kaikoura Peninsula and the adjacent coastal progradation plain, and Seaward Kaikoura Ranges. This area encompasses key coastal sediment processes and controls in a small well-constrained region that produced findings that can be scalable to other areas in New Zealand and elsewhere. Tectonics, climate, and human interventions were identified as the main controls on local sediment dynamics in Kaikoura. Key physical (faults, watersheds, landforms) and anthropogenic (hard/soft engineering structures, regulatory frameworks) factors influencing the sediment dynamics were assessed at different temporal and spatial scales. Various climate, river gauge, and beach survey data alongside local tectonic assessments were used to characterise and assess each control. Determining how each control influences local scale sediment dynamics proved challenging in a relatively sparse data context. Rainfall, ocean climate, and beach profile data analyses provided sufficient information to construct a conceptual model for the preliminary assessment of local sediment dynamics, how tectonic and climate change-induced adjustments could affect sediment supply and how future relative sea level may manifest in the Kaikoura region.

    View record details
  • Making the most of work resources: the moderating effect of regulatory focus on resilience development

    Connell, P. K. (2016)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The ever changing, volatile business world calls for resilient organisations and resilient employees. While past research suggests the need to identify factors that contribute to employee resilience development, there is limited empirical research that clarifies these factors. Drawing from Conservation of Resources (COR) theory, the purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between social- and feedback-related resources, and resilient employee behaviours, and to explore the moderating role of regulatory foci (prevention and promotion) in this relationship. A survey was conducted among 162 participants from four organisations. Moderated multiple regressions, considering 3-way interactions, were conducted to test the theoretical assumptions. Findings from this study suggest that: 1) individuals with a high promotion and high prevention focus display higher levels of employee resilience, irrespective of resource levels, 2) the resilience of employees with a low promotion and low prevention profile is impacted by resource availability, and 3) mismatch in regulatory foci (i.e., individuals exhibiting high levels of one regulatory focus and low levels of the other) accounts for unique relationships between resources and resilient behaviours. This is the first study to examine the interaction between promotion and prevention, and to assess the prevalence and role of regulatory foci in workplace factors.

    View record details
  • Supporting the supporters : how adolescent females respond to a friend who engages in non-suicidal self-injury : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand

    Fisher, Kelly Alana (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a maladaptive coping strategy employed by young people in response to feelings of distress. Adolescents are more likely to communicate engagement in NSSI with their peers whom they turn to for support. How young people respond to peers engaging in self-harm, how this impacts the friendship, and how these supporters cope with assuming and administering this role are largely unknown. A qualitative methodology, Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), was chosen for this project in order to explore and understand the sense-making experiences of participants. Five female, Year 10 students from a single school in the Hawke’s Bay were interviewed. Five themes were identified including NSSI and relationships, burden and responsibility, the helping response, costs of caring, and supporter needs. The results highlighted the complex nature of this helping relationship and emphasised the need for increased and multifaceted forms of support to be provided to those responding to a peer engaging in self-harm. Young people indicated several factors that would be helpful to assist support providers to continue to help peers in distress including access to information about effective ways to support a friend engaging in NSSI and to be providing this support within a network that functions to resource and support the supporters. High schools are challenged to engage young people in the design and structure of student health and well-being services in their school, and the implementation of a student-led mentoring programme that caters for the support needs of the supporter is advocated.

    View record details
  • Katherine of Aragon : a "pioneer of women's education"? : humanism and women's education in early sixteenth century England : a thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in History at Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    Croon Hickman, Leanne (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    In 1548, Eaton School headmaster Nicolas Udall stated that “it was now a common thing to see young virgins so trained in the study of good letters, that they willingly set all other vain pastimes at naught, for learning sake.”1 What led to English women becoming educated enough to garner such an observation? The purpose of this study is to consider the changing attitudes towards the education of women that began with a proliferation of works written on the subject, by humanist scholars in 1520s England. It will be shown that during the 1520s a burgeoning number of works featuring theories on female learning were produced primarily in reaction to the need to educate Princess Mary as the only heir to the throne. As the driving force behind the writing of many of these works, Katherine of Aragon has been called “a pioneer of female education in England”. It will be considered whether this label is accurate and what other influences affected female education. This research will also provide an overview on the effects of these flourishing views on female education and how women were showing their learning in practice through iconography, book ownership and the writing activities that women engaged in.

    View record details
  • A Psychotherapist's Experience of Grief: An Heuristic Enquiry

    Alleyne, Bronwyn

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This research explored my subjective experience of being a bereaved psychotherapist, both personally and professionally, in a hospice and a private practice setting. The focus was to find the meaning within my grief experience by investigating, analysing, and reflecting on my experience via a systematic, internal, creative, intuitive, immersive, and deepening explorative process that the heuristic research method and methodology offered. My grief was captured in qualitative and immersive grief depictions, initial questions from which populated my personal search for the answers; and to which I recursively and painfully immersed myself in to explicate the core themes and the essence of the experience.

    View record details
  • Assessing How Small Island Communities Prepare for a Tsunami: A Case Study of Phi Phi Island, Thailand

    Poompoe, Arissara

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami revealed that the west coast, and many of its small islands, in the Andaman Sea are vulnerable to tsunamis. Such a devastating event also emphasised the importance of having local communities well prepared to deal with future tsunamis. Since the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, a number of risk mitigation measures have been developed in the tsunami prone-areas. However, about 11 years after the event, little is known about the levels of preparedness of Thai residents living on islands exposed to tsunamis. This study aims to identify the elements underlying preparedness of the local people residing in Thai small islands, and scrutinize the preparedness measures undertaken by the government agencies since the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Phi Phi Island was used as a case study as it is representative of the many small islands located in the Andaman Sea. The present research relied on a questionnaire survey carried out with over 20 permanent residents from Phi Phi Island – about 10 percent of the residents living in the study area. This research also utilised field observation and analysis of relevant documents, including policy documents, reports, and academic publications. Findings show that preparedness behaviours of the local residents was widely affected by their personal perception, belief, and bias of prior experience to tsunamis. The available resources within the local residents’ daily context (e.g. time, finances) and trust in the authority were crucial factors that considerably affected making decisions in taking preparedness. Many preparedness measures have been addressed in the Island (e.g. Tsunami Early Warning, Tsunami Warning Signage, Land Plan Use Guideline); however, challenges regarding their effectiveness and insufficient maintenance of those measures are evident. The present study recommends that local communities and the elements that shape their perception of tsunamis, should be, to a greater extent, integrated in the preparedness activities carried out by local government agencies. Moreover, strengthrning Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (CBDRM) approach is likely to be useful in order to promote tsunami preparedness.

    View record details
  • Musings on Musos: A Thematic Analysis of the Working Conditions Experienced by New Zealand Musicians

    Smith, Ximena

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The labour conditions in creative industries, such as the music industry, are complex. For instance, the deterioration of the 9-to-5 workday and the rise of project-based work has given creative workers more autonomy and pleasure in their work (Florida, 2002, 2005; Howkins, 2001; Leadbeater, 1999). However, other conditions that accompany creative work, such as precarity and insecurity, can result in stressful experiences for creative workers (Banks & Hesmondhalgh, 2009). The purpose of this research, then, is to explore the conditions and subjective experiences of three musicians working in the New Zealand music industry, and to obtain an account of the challenges these workers may face. Developing a deeper understanding of creatives’ experiences in the music industry is useful, because a significant amount of public money is given to New Zealand On Air and the New Zealand Music Commission to support the growth of this industry (New Zealand Music Commission, 2013; Scott & Craig, 2012). However, these government bodies have not published any research regarding the lived experiences of New Zealand music workers, or investigated the personal issues musicians may face when it comes to working successfully in the industry. The research is therefore intended to shed light on the upsides and downfalls of working in the industry, and is guided by the question: What are the experiences of New Zealand musicians regarding the labour conditions in the New Zealand music industry? In order to answer this research question, one-on-one responsive interviews were conducted with three self-identified musicians who work in New Zealand’s music industry (Rubin & Rubin, 2005). Braun and Clarke’s (2006) thematic analysis was then used to analyse and interpret the data set. Five major themes were found to be present in the data. These include the sense among the musicians that the New Zealand music scene is small; the presence of career uncertainty; the importance of authenticity; cultural entrepreneurialism; and the existence of cultural intermediaries in the musicians’ working lives. Overall, it was found that the music industry provides significant opportunities for musicians to have positive working experiences. However, these experiences may not be felt by other musicians in different circumstances, who may not be able to manage the challenges of the industry as easily as those musicians interviewed. This research therefore ends with the recommendation that further measures by the government could be taken, such as the reinvigoration of the PACE (Pathway to Arts and Cultural Employment) scheme (Shuker, 2008), in order to make good work experiences more widely accessible to those working in the music industry.

    View record details