4,465 results for Share

  • The International Journal of Wellbeing: An open access success story

    Weijers, Dan M.; Jarden, Aaron (2017)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Academics have long had the advantage of access to university libraries and their expensive subscriptions to scholarly journals. Critics of traditional journal publishing have complained that placing science and scholarship behind a paywall limits its potential. One solution to this problem is the emergence of open access journals. In this chapter, authors Weijers and Jarden offer a case study of a platinum open access journal they founded: the International Journal of Wellbeing. In their discussion of this new journal they offer both philosophical and practical insights that guide their work. They also point to often overlooked issues regarding open scholarship. One of these is the huge numbers of unaffiliated faculty or faculty from non-Western universities, all of whom suffer barriers to access to expensive journals. The authors look to increasing openness of journals to solve this and other problems.

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  • Urban Tree Diversity - Taking stock and looking ahead

    Morgenroth, J.; Östberg, J.; Konijnendijk van den Bosch, C.; Nielsen, A.B.; Hauer, R.; Sjöman, H.; Chen, W.Y.; Jansson, M. (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    The first International Conference on Urban Tree Diversity hosted in June 2014 by the Swedish University of Agricultural Science in Alnarp, Sweden highlighted the need for a better understanding of the current state of urban tree diversity. Here we present and discuss a selection of urban tree diversity themes with the intention of developing and sharing knowledge in a research area that is gaining momentum. We begin by discussing the specific role of species diversity in ecosystem service provision and ecosystem stability. This is followed by exploring the urban conditions that affect species richness. Having determined that many ecosystem services depend on urban tree species diversity and that urban environments are capable of supporting high species diversity, we conclude by addressing how to govern for urban tree diversity.

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  • Fostering incidental vocabulary uptake from audio-visual materials: The role of text comprehension

    Nguyễn, Chí Đức (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This research project explores various factors that may influence the rate of incidental foreign/second language (L2) vocabulary acquisition from audio-visual materials, with a special focus on procedures that enhance learners’ comprehension of these input materials. Informed by relevant theories and research findings in the fields of L2 listening comprehension and incidental vocabulary acquisition, I investigate the effects of having learners (a) view a TED Talks video twice rather than once, (b) sum up the content of the video before watching it a second time, (c) watch TED Talks videos on the same subject in order to increase familiarity with that subject, and (d) exchange summaries of TED Talks videos with peers so as to assist each other’s subsequent processing of those videos. As these interventions are all deemed to facilitate L2 listening comprehension, they are also expected to create favourable conditions for incidental vocabulary uptake to occur. The effects on incidental vocabulary acquisition of the above interventions were gauged in a series of classroom experiments with Vietnamese EFL learners. Although vocabulary uptake was generally far from spectacular, all of the tested procedures were found to result in statistically significant vocabulary gains. The insertion of the output tasks (i.e., the summary activities) was particularly useful. First, they helped to enhance the learners’ text comprehension. Second, they created opportunities for the learners to use newly met words and thus consolidate their knowledge of these lexical items. A thread through the experimental data is the strong association between the learners’ vocabulary uptake and their comprehension of the input content. The findings from this research project are consistent with several established notions, models and theories in the fields, including Ausubel’s Advance Organizer (1978), Hulstijn and Laufer’s Involvement Load Hypothesis (2001), Krashen’s Input Hypothesis (1985), Nation’s Vocabulary Generation (2013), Swain’s Output Hypothesis (2005), and Wittrock’s Model of Generative Teaching of Comprehension (1991). However, there are also findings that go beyond the core tenets of these, and that can further our understanding of how learners process new lexical items in meaning-focused input and output tasks. Regarding pedagogical implications, this research project confirms that fostering L2 listening comprehension creates favourable conditions for incidental vocabulary acquisition to happen, and that the aforementioned classroom procedures are facilitative in this regard, albeit to different degrees.

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  • Can we improve participation in university course surveys using mobile tools? : a practical experiment

    Parsons, D.; Rees, M. (2017-05-10T05:37:14Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Student course surveys provide an important feedback mechanism for universities. However the quality of this feedback depends largely on the level of participation. New technologies have enabled course surveys to evolve from written paper-based tools to web-based and mobile channels, but using these channels does not necessarily lead to better response rates. This paper discusses the results of a survey designed and administered at Massey University, New Zealand, to gain insights into students’ attitudes towards course surveys and factors that might impact on their participation. The survey also explored the potential interest in mobile channels for providing course feedback. The responses to this survey informed a pilot study that tested a mobile course survey tool. The results of our experiment suggest that, whilst a mobile channel may lead to improved participation, more significant results would depend on its integration into a broader set of strategies and tools for student engagement.

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  • Considerations on the effect of solutal on the grain size of castings from superheated melts

    Bolzoni, Leandro; Babu, Nadendla Hari (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The amount of solutal present in an alloy affects the grain size of the cast metal as solute is rejected at the solidification front. This is normally quantified using the so called growth restriction factor Q. This work presents some considerations about the effect of solutal on the final cast structure with a focus on the nature of the alloy system, the effect of non-equilibrium solidification conditions and the effect of superheating of the molten metal.

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  • Urban Rural Differences in Breast Cancer in New Zealand

    Lawrenson, Ross; Lao, Chunhuan; Elwood, Mark; Brown, Charis; Sarfati, Diana; Campbell, Ian (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Many rural communities have poor access to health services due to a combination of distance from specialist services and a relative shortage of general practitioners. Our aims were to compare the characteristics of urban and rural women with breast cancer in New Zealand, to assess breast cancer-specific and all-cause survival using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox proportional hazards model, and to assess whether the impact of rurality is different for Māori and New Zealand (NZ) European women. We found that rural women tended to be older and were more likely to be Māori. Overall there were no differences between urban and rural women with regards their survival. Rural Māori tended to be older, more likely to be diagnosed with metastatic disease and less likely to be screen detected than urban Māori. Rural Māori women had inferior breast cancer-specific survival and all-cause survival at 10 years at 72.1% and 55.8% compared to 77.9% and 64.9% for urban Māori. The study shows that rather than being concerned that more needs to be done for rural women in general it is rural Māori women where we need to make extra efforts to ensure early stage at diagnosis and optimum treatment.

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  • Dolls, Diagrams and Drawings: Interviewers’ Perspectives on Visual Aids in Child Witness Interviews

    Hill, Alexandra (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    In cases of child maltreatment child witnesses are often the sole sources of information about the suspected events, meaning their contribution to an investigation is critical. However, children may find recounting their experiences in sufficient detail challenging (Poole & Bruck, 2012). Visual aids are the tools (e.g. diagrams, drawings, and dolls) forensic interviewers often use in interviews to help children remember or describe their experiences and overcome children’s social and cognitive limitations. Research evaluating these aids indicates that any gains in information, reported by children, are typically accompanied by significant increases in false details, thus compromising the accuracy of accounts (Brown, 2011). The purpose of this study was to establish the extent to which interviewers in New Zealand use visual aids with children, and their knowledge of relevant research and the national interviewing protocol. Thirty-one New Zealand Specialist Child Witness Interviewers completed a questionnaire that assessed how and why they use aids, and their knowledge of, and adherence to, the literature and protocols guiding interviewer practice with visual aids. Interviewers’ responses indicated they used a range of aids, with both younger and older children, for a range of reasons, many of which have not been extensively researched. Generally, interviewers had poor knowledge of the existing research and protocol guidelines, and knowledge did not predict adherence to the recommendations. The findings identify the need to educate interviewers about the evidence-base surrounding various aids, as well as conducting research that more closely reflects how aids are used with children.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Hutt Valley, Capital & Coast and Wairarapa DHBs 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Southern District Health Board 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Midland Region 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Hawke's Bay 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in MidCentral and Whanganui 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the South Island 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Canterbury and the West Coast 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Northern District Health Boards 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Nelson Marlborough and South Canterbury 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • Leading different dimensions of organization performance through human resource management practices

    Mansouri, N.; Goher, Khaled

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    The primary purpose of this research work is to find out how human resource management practices including training, staffing, performance appraisal, participation, and reward system can affect the performance of Malaysian Information and Communication Technology (ICT) companies. Company’s performance is identified in this work in terms of innovation, learning and growth, and internal process. The results of analysis of 223 gathered data showed that human resource management practices have significant and positive impact on innovation, learning and growth, and internal process. In addition, this study showed that performance components can affect each other significantly and positively. In this research work, the data is collected through questionnaire and analyzed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software. Moreover, the respondents of this research work are the employees of small and medium size ICT companies located in Cyberjaya, Malaysia.

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  • Improving Adolescent Girls' Argument Writing: A Tier 1 Self-Regulated Strategy Development Intervention in a New Zealand Secondary School Social Studies Classroom

    Hutchinson, Kathryn (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Self-Regulated Strategy Development (SRSD) is a model of writing instruction with a convincing evidence base (Santangelo, Harris & Graham, 2016). The present study examines why SRSD is more effective for some students than for others. A mixed methods one-group pre-post design was used to compare writing performance, writing self-efficacy, self-regulation for writing, and knowledge of argument writing. The whole-class (n=27) wrote argument essays using an SRSD writing instruction method, in an urban multicultural New Zealand secondary school. Students completed the following digital scales and questionnaires: a writing self-efficacy scale, a self-regulation aptitude for writing scale, and writing knowledge questionnaires pre- and post-intervention. Following the quantitative phase, where students showed gains in argument writing, interviews were conducted with a sample of students who showed low, moderate and high gains in argument writing. Results indicate that while SRSD instruction in argument writing improves writing performance generally, transcription issues can be barriers to writing progress, as can issues with ideation and self-regulation. This Tier 1 SRSD intervention contributes to the SRSD writing research in that it supports the global generalisability of the SRSD method in teaching argument writing, and evaluates reasons for its relative effectiveness.

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  • Management of Osteoarthritis: A guide to non-surgical intervention

    Abbott, J. Haxby (2014-07-16)

    Book
    University of Otago

    The MOA trial (Management of Osteoarthritis, or Maimoatanga Mate Köiwi) was a randomised clinical trial that aimed to investigate the long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of both a multi-modal, individualised, supervised exercise therapy programme, and an individualised manual therapy programme, compared with usual medical care, for the management of pain and disability in adults with hip or knee OA. The first chapter of this book provides an introduction to OA and its management. The subsequent chapters provide the detailed treatment protocols delivered in the MOA trial.

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  • Walking aids for older adults: review of end-user needs

    Mansouri, N.; Goher, Khaled

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    Aged population of senior citizens is growing noticeably at different regions in the world. Consequently, there are great numbers of demands for healthcare services. One of the services is assistive walking devices which have important role in mobility, stability, walking, and independency of older adults. Although various type of walking devices are available for older adults, yet fall incidents with severe injuries take place. Therefore, it is critical to analyze fall incidents, find out fall factors, and assess walking devices to minimize fall. This paper mainly focuses on risk factors of fall, considerable role of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in walking devices, and also analyzes fall incidents with the purpose of understanding how fall incidents take place. This paper assists to have a clear understanding about fall incidents and its associated injuries.

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