4,479 results for 2008

  • Integrated curriculum, mathematics and standards based assessment in secondary education : parts of the solution : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Educational Studies in Mathematics at Massey University

    Morey, Chris (2008)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The concept of integrated curriculum (IC) has a long history in the education literature dating back to the 1920s. The approach is based on the belief that curriculum is most engaging and effective when driven by student interest and subject boundaries are transcended as required to support thematic and inquiry based learning. Integrated approaches had little impact on mainstream subject based curricula through most of the twentieth century but in the last 10 to 20 years interest has increased markedly. A case study methodology was adopted for this research to explore: how IC is currently being implemented in New Zealand, how mathematics is related to integrated programmes; how standards based assessment (SBA), particularly NCEA, impacts on IC; and how current proposals for the evolution of NCEA and SBA for IC are regarded by IC practitioners. Three secondary schools with substantial IC programmes participated. Data was gathered primarily through semi-structured interviews with senior teachers: four from integrated studies disciplines (English and social sciences) and four from mathematics. The three schools were found to be distributed widely along the interdisciplinary continuum from strongly subject based to more transdisciplinary curricula. Three major categories of integration themes were common to all three schools: Social Justice and Local Issues; Sustainable Economics and Environment; and Biography, Self discovery and Change. The three schools had quite distinct ways of managing the formal collegial collaboration required for the coordination and development of integration programmes. All three reported tensions related to this collaboration. It is suggested that the interdisciplinary continuum conceptualization of IC be expanded to include a social dimension. Learning gains, increased student motivation and improved student behaviour were reported to be the main benefits of IC although the mathematics participants were more equivocal about motivational benefits than the integrated studies participants. The main challenges reported were concerned with integrated curriculum development, rigour, assessment, and timetable and programme coordination. Strategies suggested for overcoming perceived difficulties included professional development for teachers in all aspects of IC, and time and funding for the development of integrated curriculum and assessment resources. Mathematics was found to be a particularly difficult discipline to integrate with others, especially the social sciences. The mathematics/integrated studies divide was characterised by contrasting orientations toward curriculum and assessment, differing perceptions of student motivation and differences in collegial collaborative styles. The mathematics participants regarded small group and inquiry based learning and assessment as promising strategies for developing IC in mathematics. Level 1 NCEA mathematics unit standards and level 3 statistics standards were reported as being amenable to combinations with standards in other learning areas for assessing interdisciplinary courses. The NCEA was seen by participants as a positive development for IC. However, negative impacts also noted included: credit seeking, curriculum fragmentation, and constraints placed on interdisciplinary combinations of standards by university entrance requirements. The proposed development for NCEA regarded as most promising for IC was new broad-based integrated standards linked to groups of existing content and skills specific standards.

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  • An investigation into practices, issues and improvement opportunities of logistical outsourcing : a study of integrated warehouse services : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Applied Science in Logistics and Supply Chain Management at Massey University

    Rachmayani, Novianti (2008)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Some Bahasa Indonesian Language

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  • How New Zealand women experience their partners' imprisonment : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Crabtree, Angela J (2008)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    In New Zealand in 2006 there were almost 6,000 men in prison, with predictions that the numbers may rise to 9,000 by the year 2010. Almost a quarter of those imprisoned men reported having a spouse or partner at home, and almost 600 reported one or more dependent children. This means that there are at least 2,500 women and children in New Zealand who are directly affected by the incarceration of their man. My aim in this research was to explore the impacts and meaning of imprisonment for those women whose partners are in prison, and thereby to contribute to an understanding of these impacts, stimulate debate, and draw attention to a silenced and undervalued population within our communities. In-depth, unstructured interviews were used to collect data from six women whose partners were in prison. lnterviews were recorded, transcribed, and analysed using a narrative approach of inquiry. Data analysis supports prior findings that the impacts of imprisonment of a partner are generally detrimental to women and families. The women interviewed reported difficulties related to their partners' imprisonment in almost every aspect of their lives: emotional, physical, financial, social and familial. There is currently little social, community, or government support for these women and families, despite the recognition that family well-being is critically important in reducing recidivism. I offer some recommendations for improving the situation for women whose partners are in prison, and make suggestions for future research.

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  • Tangata whaiora/consumers perspectives on current psychiatric classification systems

    Moeke-Maxwell, Tess; Wells, D; Mellsop, Graham (2008-06-12)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background A number of studies have been undertaken with the aim of considering the utility of mental health classification systems from the perspective of a variety of stakeholders. There is a lack of research on how useful consumers/tangata whaiora think these are in assisting them in their recovery. Methods Seventy service users were involved in seven focus groups in order to consider this question. Results and discussion While for clinicians diagnosing someone might be a discrete event and easily forgotten as a moment in a busy schedule, most people in this study remembered the occasion and aftermath very clearly. The overall consensus was that whether being 'diagnosed' was helpful or not, in large part, depended on how the process happened and what resulted from being 'labeled' in the person's life. Conclusion Overall, people thought that in terms of their recovery, the classification systems were tools and their utility depended on how they were used. They suggested that whatever tool was used it needed to help them make sense of their distress and provide them with a variety of supports, not just medication, to assist them to live lives that were meaningful to them.

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  • Being comfortable : having and making a comfortable cognitive and environmental habitat : a grounded theory on the meaning of home : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Aspinall, Charlotte Nicola (2008)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Prior research on the meanings of home represents a rather fragmented set of studies. The present research utilises phenomenology and aims to create a grounded theory on the meanings of home which is explorative, participant-led and integrates the current state of home research. 15 participants singularly took part in semi-structured interviews, including myself as a participant-researcher. The interviews were audio taped but not transcribed. The interviews were then analysed qualitatively as per grounded theory methodology. Participant's interpretation of the word home was both construed as having a spatial definition, and varying along a continuum from home as a house to a more subjective definition of home. The core code that the data generated on the meanings of home was that home was primarily about being comfortable. The basic social process of making a comfortable habitat was the main axial code. While the idea of comfort held strong between participants there was much individuality as to what was comfortable and which particular strategies were employed to make home comfortable. The result was a grounded theory about person environment interactions in the field of home, a cognitive and a physical habitat. Implications of this theory are discussed in relation to current and future home research as well as suggestions for practical applications.

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  • Bullying in secondary schools : a discursive approach : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Psychology at Massey University

    Ryan, Anne Beryl (2008)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This study attempts to transcend the narrow boundaries imposed on mainstream research into bullying by its adherence to a modernist discourse of individualism. The theoretical framework for this research argues that a modernist focus has both limited our understanding of the phenomenon and contributed to its continued occurrence. An approach that is underpinned by the ontological and epistemological assumptions of a social constructionist paradigm offers the potential for a broader and more encompassing analysis of this formidable social issue. Language is taken as a critical focus of attention because of its pervasiveness in social interaction. Discourse is understood as actively constructing the experience and meaning of bullying. Furthermore, a consideration of the power relationships embedded within discourse is an essential feature of this approach. The study involved interviewing 24 senior students from a small provincial New Zealand secondary school to discuss a range of issues surrounding bullying. These interviews were taped and transcribed and a discourse analysis was carried out to gain an understanding of how students talk constructed bullying. Discourses were identified that constructed bullying as disparity, as irrelevant, as a consequence of difference, as a form of discipline, and as inevitable. The construction of bullying as disparity was seen to struggle against the other prevailing educational discourses that together functioned to maintain the status quo of power relationships in the educational institution. It is suggested that the acceptance of such 'common sense' constructions of bullying are effectively sustaining the pervasiveness of bullying in schools today.

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  • Devil's in the Detail: Non-Commercial Business Losses

    Cassidy, Julie (2008)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Behind the economic figures : large-scale mining and rural poverty reduction in Zambia : the case of Kansanshi Copper Mine in Solwezi : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy in Development Studies at Massey University, Palmerston North

    Cheelo, Kingsley Haanyembe (2008)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Mining is promoted as a lead-economic sector in most mineral-rich countries. Depending on the contemporary global development ideology, the place of mining within the development industry has always been justified. Under the poverty reduction agenda, which took the centre-stage in the late 1990s and early 2000s, it has been argued in theory that investments, especially in large-scale mining would lead to poverty reduction in mining communities through opening up economic opportunities in which they can participate; increase their capabilities to participate in the local economies; enhance their security by reducing their vulnerability and exposure to risks; and empowering them to participate in issues that affect their lives. Zambia as a mineral-rich country adapted the linkages between mining and poverty reduction and promoted the development of Kansanshi copper mine within the country's macroeconomic policy framework of achieving sustained economic growth and poverty reduction. Because of the positive response of the mining sector to huge investments, the domestic economy has been recording positive growth rates in excess of 5 percent since the beginning of the 2000s, with other economic indicators such as inflation, currency appreciation, and balance of payments recording positive trends. Applying the Sustainable Livelihoods Framework (SLF), this thesis explores the extent to which the development of Kansanshi copper mine in Solwezi has impacted on local people's livelihoods in the context of the four linkages between mining and poverty reduction promulgated in theory. It comes out clearly in the thesis that the development of the mine has opened up economic opportunities that are in areas that do not allow the full participation of local people; the development of local people's capabilities is either minimal or non-existent; mine development enhanced local people's vulnerability and exposure to risks through displacement and seizure of productive systems; and disempowered them through the way mining and land rights were obtained from the government. The thesis concludes on the note that since mining development cannot be stopped, there is need for governments to deliberately cater for local people who often struggle to fit within the transformed local economies through comprehensive implementation frameworks that promote interaction among parties involved and improved communication channels, skills training and provision of relevant resources such as agricultural inputs and microcredit facilities.

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  • Hikaru Yamashita, Humanitarian Space and International Politics: The Creation of Safe Areas (Aldershot, UK: Ashgate Publishing, 2004)

    Moses, Jeremy (2008)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Book review

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  • Exploring political blogs as a form of alternative media

    Kenix, L.J. (2008)

    Oral Presentations
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Hollow Avowals of Human Rights Protection - Time for an Australian Federal Bill of Rights?

    Cassidy, Julie (2008)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Unlike the constitutions of many nations, such as the United States of America and the Republic of South Africa, the constitutions of the Australian States and Territories and the Commonwealth Constitution Act 1901 (UK) contain no bill of rights. Australia is the only western democracy without a federal bill of rights. The debate regarding the need for a bill of rights necessitates an understanding of what human rights the people of Australia already enjoy. If sufficient protection can be found in existing sources, does Australia really need a federal bill of rights? Opponents of a bill of rights state that we have sufficient protection from arbitrary government intervention in our personal affairs and thus a bill of rights is unnecessary. There are a number of potential sources of human rights in Australia that might provide the suggested existing protection, including the common law, specific domestic legislation, international law and constitutional law. Each of these sources of human rights has, however, important limitations. The focus of this article is on the inadequacy of the Australian constitutions as a source of purported protection. This in turn suggests that an alternative source of rights is needed - a federal bill of rights? In the course of this analysis the author makes suggestions for reform; specifically how a federal bill of rights may address the paucity of constitutional protection.

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  • Absorptive capacity and knowledge transfer : an exploratory model for university-led research institutes (RIs) and small and medium enterprises (SMEs) : a 152.800 thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the degree of Masters of Business Studies in Management at Massey University

    Paul, Smita (2008)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    'Absorptive capacity' is a construct used to define an organisation's ability to exploit knowledge that is available internally and externally. The construct is very popular within management research and has been used to describe the absorptive capacity of a range of strategic Multinational Corporation partners through to whole regions of countries. SMEs account for over 95% of businesses throughout the world. They provide innovation, productivity and economic growth, but because of their size and resources cannot afford to carry out costly Research and Development (R&D). They therefore need to be able to harness the intellectual property from universities through University-led Research institutes. This thesis uses the construct of absorptive capacity to propose a theoretical model to analyse the knowledge transfer from a University-led Research Institute (RI) to an SME, when the SME is commercialising a product or process the RI has developed. The application of absorptive capacity in this context would allow SME researchers and managers to develop understanding of how this knowledge transfer is affected by internal and external factors. The importance of continued government funding to ensure the collaboration between SMEs and RIs is highlighted. This research design is highly exploratory resulting in a range of future research suggestions for future hypothesis generation. Most important of these are suggestions for determining, defining and developing the organisational determinants of absorptive capacity. This will allow a prescriptive analysis of how knowledge transfer occurs between the SME and RI and how managers can foster organisational absorptive capacity for successful knowledge transfer. Additionally, the temporal aspect of the SME and RI relationship could be explored, such as the impact of the initial experience on the ease and length of future knowledge transfer relationships. Also, researchers could study the change in the SME's knowledge requirements from the RI as the SME's organisational structure grows.

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  • Publicising the lives of public people : nothing to hide, nothing to fear?

    Khodaverdi, Maryam, 1983- (2008)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • The paradox of the child soldier

    Brown, Elizabeth Charlotte. (2008)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Māori and the criminal justice system : finding effective solutions to Māori criminal offending

    Waetford, TāNe (2008)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Criminal responsibility and child soldiers : dealing with a duel identiy dilemma

    Chhiba, Neisha. (2008)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • The right to humanitarian intervention as a rule of customary international law

    Raap, BjöRn. (2008)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples : achieving international recognition of indigenous peoples' rights

    Waetford, TāNe. (2008)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • A proposed sex offender register for New Zealand : privacy and freedom of expression in perspective

    Simonsen, Amelia. (2008)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Freedom of expression and good taste and decency in television : blurring the line between offence and harm

    Tat, Lisa. (2008)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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