4,887 results for 2009

  • Why place Māori children with Māori caregivers? : a dissertation presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Social Work (Applied) Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Montgomery, Mary Avril (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This qualitative study explores the concepts of customary care, recognising the Maori worldview and emphasising the value of placing Maori children with Maori caregivers. It examines the establislunent of the Matua Whangai Programme in the context of the social/political issues of the 1980-1990s and the impact of legislation and reports on the placement of Maori children outside of whanau. The participants in this study were three caregivers m the Matua Whangai Programme. They each had experience of customary care practice in their own whanau and who generalised this experience in the context of the Matua Whangai programme. In this community, the Matua Whangai programme ran from 1985 to 1991. The study shows that when the programme was disestablished, not only did Maori children lose access to whanau whangai (foster families), the community also lost tribal linkages, both locally and nationally, along with effective networks with other social and governmental agencies established by Matua Whangai within the Lower South Island

    View record details
  • "Lives overpromised" : the transition to adulthood and the 'quarter-life crisis' : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Rasmussen, Nikki Jane (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    In recent years there has been a lot of speculation and (often negative) stereotyping about 'Generation Y'. Many witty labels have emerged to describe the generation from an outside perspective, but few have explored the perspective of these young people as they enter the 'real world' and embark upon their 'adult' lives. Whilst the generation has had limited attention from the academic world, the concept of a 'quarter-life crisis' has emerged through the popular media, proposed by journalists Robbins and Wilner (2001). Although such a concept may be readily dismissed as media hype, or a fabrication of spoiled, whining 'Gen Y'ers, there is much evidence to suggest that the transition to adulthood today is much more complex and turbulent than that experienced by previous generations. Through six focus group discussions involving 26 members of Generation Y going through the 'quarter-life' (or 'emerging adulthood') stage, this study sought to explore how the transition to adulthood is experienced by young people in New Zealand, including the highs and lows, challenges and pitfalls; whether these years represented a time of personal 'crisis'; and how they felt about their future looking forward. Participants' stories suggested that many felt ill-prepared for the demands and decisions of the 'real world', which sat at odds with what they had been conditioned to expect. While not all of the participants experienced this phase as a 'crisis' in the true sense of the word, many found themselves disappointed with how life in the 'real world' was turning out, unsettled by the disintegration of their initial plans and dreams, and overwhelmed by the complexity of this life stage. Nonetheless, they clung to hopes that the "good life" and the "happily ever after" that they had long-expected would eventually materialise - that fate would intervene and deliver the destiny they felt they deserved. The findings highlight the mismatch between how young people are prepared for the transition to adulthood and how they experience it. The implications of this situation and recommendations for addressing it are discussed.

    View record details
  • Rebuilding communities : a case study of empowerment in post-conflict Rwanda : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy in Development Studies at Massey University

    Parsons, Anna (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Empowerment became a popular concept in the 1990s, so popular that some believe the concept has lost its impact. This thesis uses the empowerment levels of; personal, relational and community, to investigate a psychosocial intervention in the post-conflict environment. The post-conflict environment is one that is disempowering for both men and women. Rwanda, one of the most complicated and devastated post-conflict situations seen since World War II, is the location of the World Vision intervention examined in this thesis. World Vision's Personal Development Workshop aims to provide a safe environment where people can process their experiences of the genocide. They use lectures, individual exercises and small group discussions to cover the topics of understanding the grief process, dealing with emotions and the concept of forgiveness. The thesis concludes that both male and female participants of the Personal Development Workshops have been empowered at all three levels. It shows the benefit of using the empowerment approach in the community context and suggests that consideration of psychosocial interventions is crucial in post-conflict settings. The need for such interventions to be continued for many years after the conflict has ended is also identified.

    View record details
  • Is the boundaryless career an organisational benefit, liability or irrelevance? : an investigation into boundaryless career competencies, career success and intention to leave : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Boyd, Charlotte Rebecca (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis asked whether contemporary organisations are faced with a paradox: are boundaryless career competencies linked to career success but also organisational turnover? Employees of a large New Zealand organisation (n= 568) were surveyed using an intranet based questionnaire. Through analysis using structural equation modelling, the best fit model showed that people who demonstrate a high level of investment in career competencies were also likely to show a high level of career success but, contrary to expectations, people who are successful in their careers are less likely to think about leaving the organisation. Therefore, contrary to boundaryless career theory, inter-organisational movement is not necessarily the goal for contemporary career actors. It may be that people stay in an organisation despite, or even because, they are investing in boundaryless career competencies. Furthermore, people who see internal opportunities for mobility are less likely to consider leaving, while people who see external opportunities for mobility will have a higher intention to leave. Hence whether people with high career success stay or go may depend on whether the organisation allows for expression of career competencies. It may be that internal opportunities trump external opportunities, or vice versa. This research is valuable in three key ways, providing: (1) the operationalisation of career competencies, tentatively shown to link to career success, for use in career management and further research (2) findings which question the key boundaryless career assumptions of mobility and the end of the organisational career (3) an interpretation of results suggesting non-significant effects of age and gender may be due to allowance for shifting priorities and context in the model. In light of these findings the Chameleon Career is suggested as an alternative metaphor to the boundaryless career, to reflect the need for the individual and the organisation to adapt to the changing environment.

    View record details
  • Facilitating a blended learning community : a collaborative approach to professional learning : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Education at Massey University

    Bell, Heather (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis has researched the question of "How can blended learning communities be facilitated to support the professional learning of inservice teacher educators?" Inservice teacher educators work to build teacher capability with the ultimate goal of raising student achievement. This relatively small group of people work across large geographical areas and are having increasing difficulty meeting the demands of the teachers. In addition, inservice teacher educators' contact with teachers is often less frequent than is desirable to ensure sustainable shifts in practice. However the growth in internet-based collaborative tools has meant that different ways of communicating are being created at exponential rates. Due to the natural limitations on inservice teacher educators' work, innovative ways of sustaining the professional development they provide are becoming increasingly important. The action research project described in this thesis has investigated one of these innovative approaches; not towards shifting teacher practice but focusing rather on improving the practice of the inservice teacher educators themselves. Five inservice teacher educators known as Isteam (Inservice teacher educators at Massey) formed a professional learning community to investigate the use of blended learning communities which use a combination of both face to face and online learning environments. While this thesis discusses how blended learning communities can be facilitated to support the professional learning of inservice teacher educators, Isteam themselves investigated the potential of using both blended learning communities to support the professional learning of teachers they worked with. Isteam met physically face to face on regular occasions and carried on their learning virtually between meetings through an easily modifiable webpage environment known as a wiki. This thesis discusses how these two environments wove their relative strengths together to build the professional learning of Isteam in ways that far exceeded the possibilities of using one or other learning community on its own. Research findings indicate that blended learning communities require early phases of building knowledge and social relationships, and that developing pedagogical capability relies on these building blocks to be in place first. Blended learning communities worked most effectively to improve the professional learning of inservice teacher educators when the facilitator: 1. Provided a range of online and face to face opportunities for inservice teacher educators to build their professional knowledge and gain confidence and competency in using online collaborative technologies, particularly in the early phases of the community's development. 2. Engaged inservice teacher educators in a range of online opportunities, including non task-related activities, to develop social relationships and get participants 'talking' comfortably online. 3. Challenged inservice teacher educators to use their growing knowledge and social relationships as platforms for critically reflecting on their professional learning and practice issues. As a result of these findings, the inservice teacher educators involved in this research project are now strengthening the communities they have already established to ensure they grow to their full potential, and are mentoring other colleagues to develop their own blended learning communities in response to requests for help. Blended learning communities have piqued the interest of inservice teacher educators at Massey as having powerful potential to embrace the demands of working in the 21st century.

    View record details
  • An evaluation of action research methods in developing a national instructor induction package for a Private Training Establishment : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Education in Adult Education at Massey University

    Gray, Yvonne (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The provision of appropriate, needs based workplace induction training programmes is recognised as an important step for new staff in many industries. This thesis investigates the way in which action research processes can be used to enhance the induction of new instructors within a Private Training Establishment (PTE). The research was conducted within an educational workplace context where action research methods were applied in practice and where the action research group developed a new instructor induction resource by working together collaboratively to identify and solve their problems. Evaluative action research processes were used to assess the effectiveness of the team approach. Data was gathered during three collaborative action research cycles (plan, act, observe and reflect) over a period of 12 months. Information was obtained from collaborating group workshops which included review discussions, reflective practice and evaluations, verbal and written feedback from new instructors and other key people, and researcher autobiographical journal notes. The data was analysed using spreadsheets and group discussions of recorded information. The results show how an increased level of member participation and collaboration can inform the research methods and direction as well as benefit induction processes and professional development outcomes. Working together collaboratively helped the group to find new ways of addressing their specific induction issues, primarily through better understanding and appreciation of each other's knowledge, ideas and views. A range of factors both influenced and enabled the participating group to solve their problems in a way previously not articulated. Notably these included discussions, academic readings, group collaboration, and increased group trust, sharing and openness. The time between group meetings was identified as being the major constraint. The findings demonstrate the positive contribution that action research methods can make to effective problem solving, particularly when managers of educational organisations wish to proactively improve their business and educational standards.

    View record details
  • User-centred mobile navigation system interface development for improved personal geo-identification and navigation

    Delikostidis, I.; van Elzakker, C.P.J.M. (2009)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Introduction Orientating and navigating with the use of mobile navigation systems involves interaction with different sources of information. Landmarks are very important into linking these sources. However, outcomes of user research projects in such fields are not yet fully implemented in the mobile navigation systems that are currently available. Objectives The objectives of this paper are the presentation and explanation of a conceptual model of the interactions between the users of a geo-mobile application, their mental maps, reality and the mobile map displays. This model is used to create a series of guidelines for a usable mobile (carto-) graphic interface which contributes to the implementation of a prototype design solution. Methodology In order to meet the objectives of the research, two main sources of information are used: already existing research literature and the results of the analysis of two of our experiments with real users. The aim of the first experiment was to compare different methodologies for field-based usability testing of geo-mobile applications. Investigating the behaviour of pedestrian visitors to unfamiliar cities while orientating and navigating with the use of already existing geo-mobile applications was the aim of the latter. Results A conceptual design of a user interaction model as well as user interface prototype design solutions for personal geo-identification and navigation can be considered as the concrete outcomes of the research described in this paper. The results also demonstrate the importance of landmarks in the geo-identification and navigation processes of the users. Conclusions Following User-Centred Design in order to develop a more usable mobile cartographic interface for pedestrian navigation can reveal a lot of information regarding the user-environment-system interactions. Several design aspects can be extracted from modeling these interactions that could be used for the prototype development. However, usability testing is needed to determine the success of the followed approach.

    View record details
  • Ethics and practice: Australian and New Zealand conservation contexts

    Smith, Catherine Ann; Scott, Marcelle (2009-01)

    Book item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

    View record details
  • Holy pharma! : healthism discourses in a pharmaceutical advertising website : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Hathaway, Madeleine (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Pages 123 and 143 are missing from the original copy.

    View record details
  • The Canadian response to Aboriginal Residential Schools: Lessons for Australia and the United States?

    Cassidy, Julie (2009)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The common policy of the Australian, Canadian and United States governments of removing Aboriginal children from their families and placing them in institutions is now well documented. This article considers the responses to the stolen generations in Australia, Canada and United States. A major focus of the article is the historic compensation package agreed to by the Canadian government. Whilst the Canadian federal government has not been without criticism on this issue, it must be applauded for its efforts to meet a peaceful solution to a tragic past. The political responses in Australia and United States and Canada are simply incomparable. The failure to address the plight of the stolen generations of Australia and the United States evidences a major failing in Indian/Aboriginal policy in these two nations that needs to be addressed. Australia and the United States have much to learn from the reconciliatory policies of the Canadian government.

    View record details
  • Bullying the boss : upwards bullying as a response to destructive supervisory leadership in the workplace.

    Wallace, Belinda (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Despite a growing acknowledgement of the negative outcomes for organizational functioning and the health and well-being of individuals attributable to workplace bullying, research into the phenomenon of upward bullying (supervisors bullied by their subordinates), particularly its aetiology, has received modest attention. The aim of the present study was to explore the link between destructive supervisory leadership and upward bullying and the mediating or moderating roles of perceived interactional justice, continuance commitment and workrelated meaning in this relationship. Two hundred and eight post-graduate students and two hundred and four work-based subordinate employees completed an on-line survey of their perceptions of the leadership style and interactional justice of their immediate supervisor, the levels of their own continuance commitment and work-related meaning, and the frequency with which they engaged in specific bullying behaviours targeting their supervisor. As expected, subordinate perceptions of destructive supervisory leadership were strongly associated with an increased incidence of upward bullying, with the strength of this relationship partially mediated by subordinate perceptions of interactional justice within supervisory interactions. In addition, subordinate levels of continuance commitment and work-related meaning moderated the relationship between subordinate perceptions of interactional justice and the incidence of upward bullying, such that this relationship was intensified when either, or both the level of subordinate continuance commitment or work-related meaning was higher. This paper offers preliminary support for conceptualizing upwards bullying as a retaliatory response to destructive leadership, however due to a reliance on cross-sectional data, inferences of causality cannot be made. Practical implications and directions for future research are discussed.

    View record details
  • European Union Interregionalism and the Capability-Expectations Gap

    Doidge, M. (2009)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    This article addresses interregionalism in EU external relations. It considers the nature of interregionalism centred on two functional varieties - an internally focused, capacity building interregionalism and an externally focused, globally active form - and, in broad brush strokes, the evidence for each of these forms in EU interregional strategies. On this basis, it notes a capability-expectations gap in the EU's approach to interregionalism, with a certain dissonance between the Union's apparent acknowledgement of limited regional actorness in its partner groupings on the one hand and, on the other, its coincident high-level expectations as to what is achievable in the context of these relationships. The article concludes by suggesting priority areas for EU interregional strategy.

    View record details
  • Re-presenting climate change in the alternative and mainstream press of New Zealand

    Kenix, L.J. (2009)

    Oral Presentations
    University of Canterbury Library

    View record details
  • Influenza della composizione granulometrica sul comportamento tenso-deformativo dei terreni sabbiosi

    Gazzellone, A.; Albano, M.; Chiaro, G.; Modoni, G. (2009)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    La ricerca intrapresa, di carattere sperimentale e teorico ha l'obiettivo di analizzare l'influenza della composizione granulometrica sulle caratteristiche fisiche e sulla risposta meccanica di terreni sabbiosi sottoposti a condizioni di carico variabile. A questo scopo si riportano i primi risultati di una vasta campagna di indagini sperimentale su campoini di terreno sabbioso ricostituiti in laboratorio con diverse composizioni granulometriche. In particolare si sono considerati Quattro assortimenti monogranulari, ciascuno caratterizzato da una diversa dimensione dei grani, sei assortimenti bi-granulare ed uno tri-granulare, ottenuti componendo con diverse percentuali i materiali monogranulari. Per tutti questi terreni si sono determinati, attraverso procedure sperimentali standard (ASTM D4252 e D4253), i valori minimi e massimi della densita e si e valutata l'efficacia di diverse modalita di compattamento. Successivamente sono state analizzate le permeabilita dei diversi materiali variando il loro livello di addensamento. L'ultima fase, tuttora in corso, riguarda l'esecuzione di prove triassiali eseguite applicando percorsi di carico monotonici e ciclici con una cella a percorso di carico controllato munita di idonea strumentazione per la misura locale degli spostamenti. I risultati di queste prove costituiscono la base sperimentale per la valutazione, attraverso l'impiego di modelli teorici opportunamente scelti, dell'influenza della composizione granulometrica dei terreni sulla loro risposta meccanica a diversi livelli di deformazione.

    View record details
  • Synthesising the Wanganui District Council (Prohibition of Gang Insignia) Act 2009 and the right to freedom of expression

    Galbreath, Stephen. (2009)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • Regulating commercial advertising aimed at children

    Ernst, Dominik. (2009)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • Issues of lis pendens and kompetenz-kompetenz in international commercial arbitration

    Thomas, Kym. (2009)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • Maori and the right to self-determination : exercising their right to self-determination through Treaty settlements

    Williams, Jaclyn. (2009)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • Three strikes and you're out! : the Sentencing and Parole Reform Bill

    Sheehan, Christopher. (2009)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • Holocaust denial laws versus hate speech laws in general : how far can we stretch freedom of expression?

    Duppelfeld, Monika. (2009)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details