5,448 results for 2014

  • Submission to Parliamentary Select Committee on Education and Science on Education Amendment Bill (No 2)

    Small, D. (2014)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Characterisation of gold mineralisation and geophysical aided geological mapping in the Old Man Range, Central Otago, New Zealand

    Stephens, Samuel (2014)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Six structurally controlled gold deposits are hosted within two different structural blocks in the Old Man Range area. The mineralised lodes are hosted in normal faults which cut steeply across the host schistosity. In the East structural block, mineralised faults and the prominent joint set strike northwest and cut steeply across greenschist facies TZ III Caples Terrane schist. In the West structural block, mineralised faults and prominent joint sets strike eastwest and cut steeply across upper-greenschist facies TZ IV Wanaka lithologic association schist. These structural blocks are separated by the regional scale Old Man Fault. Orientation of hard rock gold deposits is closely linked to the prominent joints in host schist surrounding the deposits. Mineralised lodes formed along -1 m wide normal fault zones. They are discontinuous but can be traced for up to - l 50m, with variable thickness along strike. The lodes comprise brecciated silicified schist and hydrothermal quartz breccia, and minor quartz veins with abundant arsenopyrite. Open cavities with euhedral quartz crystals are common. Euhedral arsenopyrite occurs in quartz and silicified schist clasts within mineralised zones. Gold occurs as micro-particulate blebs in partly oxidised arsenopyrite, and as coarser free grains within quartz, micaceous laminae, micro-faults, and micro-shears within mineralised rock. Hydrothermal alteration is minor, comprises addition of Si, Au and As, and extends only a few centimetres from the mineralised lodes. Mineralisation may have occurred within a few kilometres of the surface during mid-Late Cretaceous extension (-106-lOlMa), with estimated formation temperatures between 200-350°C. The mineralised structures within the Old Man Range area are similar to other shallow level, post-metamorphic Otago gold deposits. Magnetic, magnetite bearing greenschist has a high magnetic response and can be successfully mapped using total magnetic intensity surveys over the Old Man Range area. Electromagnetic (EM) surveys can be used successfully to map post-metamorphic faults within the Old Man Range area, where they show up as linear conductive anomalies. These geophysical surveys are a useful tool for geologic mapping. However, there is no direct link between the geophysical features and gold mineralisation within the Old Man Range.

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  • Mammillothalamic tract lesions and spatial memory in rats

    Perry, B.A.L.; Mercer, S.A.; Harland, B.C.; Canales, J.J.; Dalrymple-Alford, J.C.; D (2014)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Micro-computed tomography for plant identification in artefacts

    Smith, Catherine Ann; Lowe, Bronwyn J.; McNoughton, Andrew (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    In New Zealand the identification of materials of construction of Māori textiles has important cultural and legal connotations. However the identification of aged and processed plant material in artefacts is difficult, compounded by the need for use of nondestructive analytical methods. This paper will discuss the application, efficacy and implications of a new method that uses micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) together with an identification key as evaluative criteria for the identification of plant material in artefacts. Case studies using Māori textiles will show how plant identification using microCT can aid in ascribing cultural context to artefacts with unknown provenance, and aid in rediscovery of cultural knowledge about plant use for artefact production.

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  • Māori farming trusts - A preliminary scoping investigation into the governance and management of large dairy farm businesses.

    Phillips, Tom; Woods, Christine; Lythberg, Billie (2014)

    Report
    Massey University

    This preliminary scoping study investigates areas for possible improvement in the governance and management of large Māori dairy farm businesses. Building on the innovative practices of their tūpuna – including Rawiri Taiwhanga, the country’s first commercial dairy farmer – Māori are defining their own aspirations, realities and goals in the dairy farming world (Durie 1998, 2000). This report outlines these, and their accompanying challenges, as expressed by individuals and collectives currently engaged in Māori Dairy farm businesses. The Māori way of doing business is described in this study as having a ‘Quadruple Bottom Line of Profit, People, Environment and Community’ business objectives. More specifically, ‘Māori farms often have an inverted Quadruple Bottom Line. People, Environment and their Community often come before Profit….but without Profit none of it happens.’ Māori strategic plans and business values place emphasis on relationships, responsibilities, reciprocity and respect. These are exemplars of a Māori world-view, which explicitly acknowledges particular historic and cultural contexts (Tapsell and Woods 2010). The strategic management plans of the Māori Farming Trusts illustrate the spiral or matrix of values ‘He korunga o nga tikanga’ envisaged by Nicholson, Hēnare and Woods (2012). They prioritise the development of social capital to create competitive advantage. Such strategic plans reflect Māori vision and aspirations. These are to sustain and grow the land base; to provide leadership and guidance for the whānau; to develop capacity and resources within the Trusts and to perform better as businesses.

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  • Men, prostate cancer and complementary and alternative medicine : a narrative inquiry : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Psychology at Massey University

    Tapper, Karen Anne (2014)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Cancer is the most feared illness in Western societies. Yet remarkable medical advances are being made that extend life-spans that once would have been cut short by cancer. Prostate cancer is now a chronic disease in most cases. However in many cases medical treatment of a slowly progressing disease has left men with undesirable sequelae of treatment, such as impotence and urinary incontinence. Psychosocial research into prostate cancer has tended to concentrate on questions related to these side-effects of treatment. This research investigates a different aspect of prostate cancer; the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by men with prostate cancer. It is a qualitative narrative inquiry that investigates the stories of six men, all diagnosed with this condition and all using CAM, either in a complementary sense or as an alternative to biomedical treatment. They ranged in time since diagnosis from two months to 17 years. The narrative account is divided into three sections; the first explores causal narratives, the second explores narratives of diagnosis with prostate cancer, and the third section examines narratives of treatment, both CAM and biomedical. It contributes to the understanding of how men with prostate cancer negotiate the phases of their illness and actively integrate CAM and biomedical narratives, treatments and practices. The production of positions consistent with culturally dominant masculine values is shown to be a part of this negotiation. The finding of 'sensitising events' that predisposed men to using CAM is discussed. Men with prostate cancer negotiate complex dialectics between their quantity of life and their quality of life and between active agency in their own healing and being a patient. The clinical relationship with both physicians and CAM persons is very important in ensuring that men make treatment decisions with full information and support. Implications of the findings and future research possibilities are discussed.

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  • Felt Job Insecurity and Union Membership: The Case of Temporary Workers

    De Cuyper, N.; De Witte, H.; Sverke, M.; Hellgren, J.; Naswall, K. (2014)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    The present study investigates the relationship between felt job insecurity and union membership accounting for potential differences between temporary and permanent workers. Consistent with the idea that felt job insecurity leads workers to seek social protection from the unions, and with earlier studies, we hypothesize a positive relationship between felt job insecurity and union membership (Hypothesis 1). Furthermore, we argue that this relationship may be stronger among temporary compared with permanent workers (Hypothesis 2): insecure temporary workers are in a situation of 'double vulnerability', hence they have strong motives for unionization. Hypotheses are tested in a cross- -sectional sample of 560 Flemish (Dutch-speaking part of Belgium) workers. Our results were as follows: the relationship between felt job insecurity and union membership was not significant. The interaction term between contract type and felt job insecurity was significantly related to union membership: the relationship between felt job insecurity and union membership was positive among temporary workers, but not among permanent workers. This pattern of results may inspire unions to target future recruitment strategies on temporary workers. A route for future research could be to test our hypotheses also longitudinally.

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  • Customer-led versus market-oriented: An investigation of the lean startup methodology framework

    Jimale, Ismail Mohamed (2014)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Market-oriented approach to customer development has been strongly associated innovativeness and new product success. There is also evidence to suggest customer-led approach, or responding to explicit customer needs, impedes innovation. This thesis investigates whether the increasingly popular Lean Startup Methodology (LSM) favours customer-led or market-oriented approach to discovering and learning about customer needs. The study was conducted using a participatory action research methodology. The LSM was used as a framework for investigating the commercial value of two researched projects originating from within Victoria University. The LSM was also applied to a third project founded by the Master of Advanced Technology Enterprise (MATE) team. The LSM process is shown to assist in the discovery of both explicit and latent customer needs. However, which one the framework favours depends on whether the product or the market is the primary driver of the validation process. In one instance the entrepreneur is deliberately looking to discover a present market need in order to align it with a pre-defined solution, while the alternative is to study the market in order to identify an opportunity followed by the development of a specific solution. The latter is shown to support becoming market oriented. The findings also suggest Domain Knowledge plays a vital role in establishing and maintaining market-oriented approach to customer development. Domain knowledge aids in understanding market data in order to extract novel and meaningful insights. Establishing close relationships with emerging customers and „lead users‟ in a particular market is shown to be an effective method of compensating for a lack of domain knowledge. What‟s more, the presence of preconceived prototypes is shown to negatively impact on the entrepreneur‟s ability to approach customer development in a market-oriented manner. By drawing on the MATE team‟s experiences, this thesis aims to provide practical lessons for individuals and teams that are looking to take a market-oriented approach to customer development.

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  • Brain-computer interface for thought controlled mobility

    Gibson, M.; Markham, C.; Weston, J.; Jones, R.; Weddell, S.J.; Harris, B. (2014)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    In press

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  • Risk-based structural fire design

    Abu, A. (2014)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    To date, structural fire design has been largely based on extreme fire scenarios. Now the University of Canterbury is investigating using probabilistic assessment to improve building performance during fires.

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  • EEG-based microsleep detection using supervised learning

    Ayyagari, S.; Jones, R.D.; Weddell, S.J. (2014)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Tiredness and fatigue can often lead to brief instances of people falling asleep while engaged in some active task such as driving a motor vehicle. A study on fatigue by the General Association of German Insurance Industries, identified microsleep as the principal cause of 24% of fatal motorway accidents. Performance lapses range from brief pauses to “microsleeps”, which are brief, involuntary events of lapses in attention or responsiveness associated with events such as prolonged eye closure, blank stare etc. The aim of this project was to identify reliable physiological cues indicative of lapses, related to behavioural microsleep episodes, from the EEG, which could in turn be used to develop a real-time lapse detection (or better still, prediction) system.

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  • EEG-based event detection using optimized echo state networks with leaky integrator neurons

    Ayyagari, S.; Jones, R.D.; Weddell, S.J. (2014)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Long-haul truck drivers, train drivers and commercial airline pilots routinely experience monotonous and extended driving periods in a sedentary position, which has been associated with drowsiness, microsleeps, and, consequently, serious accidents. Microsleeps are brief involuntary events of lapses in attention or responsiveness, associated with events such as prolonged eye closure which usually last from 0.5-15 s [1]. Consequently, the detection and preferable prediction of the microsleeps in subjects, especially those working in these high-risk occupations, is very important to workplace safety. The current study aims at developing a microsleep detector using the novel recurrent neural network architecture of an echo state network (ESN) and represents progression of our research from previous methods [1, 2].

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  • White matter lesions - a factor in developing dementia in patients with Parkinson's disease

    Melzer, T.R.; Myall, D.J.; Livingston, L.; Wood, K.L.; Pitcher, T.L.; Keenan, R.J.; Macaskill, M.R.; Dalrymple-Alford, J.C.; Anderson, T.J. (2014)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Relating colour, chemical and physical characteristics of artificially light-aged New Zealand plant fibres

    Lowe, Bronwyn J; Smith, Catherine A; Gordon, Keith C; Hanton, Lyall R; Ford, Bruce; Korsten, Annika; Fraser, Sara J; Lomax, Bethany A (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Light ageing of naturally-dyed plant fibres can cause colour change, alteration of molecular bonds within the fibre structure and loss of mechanical integrity. Lighting guidelines seek to protect artefacts by limiting light exposure, for example by estimating the lux hours likely to cause colour change of “one just noticeable fade” (1JNF). However the extent of associated molecular or mechanical damage is rarely simultaneously assessed. This paper reports a pilot study investigating the effects of accelerated light ageing on muka (fibre extracted from the leaves of Phormium tenax), the most common fibre used in Māori textiles. Non-dyed and dyed muka were artificially light-aged and micro-faded to ascertain exposure resulting in 1JNF. Raman microscopy and tensile testing of individual fibres from the same samples were used to explore correlations among fading, molecular change and mechanical properties.

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  • Pre-European Maori textiles from South Island New Zealand

    Smith, Catherine Ann; Laing, Raechel M; Walter, Richard (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Otago

    Peer Reviewed

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  • Pharmacokinetics of dexmedetomidine combined with therapeutic hypothermia in a piglet asphyxia model

    Ezzati, M; Broad, K; Kawano, G; Faulkner, S; Hassell, J; Fleiss, B; Gressens, P; Fierens, I; Rostami, J; Maze, M; Sleigh, James; Anderson, B; Sanders, RD; Robertson, NJ (2014-07)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    BACKGROUND: The highly selective α2 -adrenoreceptor agonist, dexmedetomidine, exerts neuroprotective, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and sympatholytic properties that may be beneficial for perinatal asphyxia. The optimal safe dose for pre-clinical newborn neuroprotection studies is unknown. METHODS: Following cerebral hypoxia-ischaemia, dexmedetomidine was administered to nine newborn piglets in a de-escalation dose study in combination with hypothermia (whole body cooling to 33.5°C). Dexmedetomidine was administered with a loading dose of 1 μg/kg and maintenance infusion at doses from 10 to 0.6 μg/kg/h. One additional piglet was not subjected to hypoxia-ischaemia. Blood for pharmacokinetic analysis was sampled pre-insult and frequently post-insult. A one-compartment linear disposition model was used to fit data. Population parameter estimates were obtained using non-linear mixed effects modelling. RESULTS: All dexmedetomidine infusion regimens led to plasma concentrations above those associated with sedation in neonates and children (0.4-0.8 μg/l). Seven out of the nine piglets with hypoxia-ischaemia experienced periods of bradycardia, hypotension, hypertension and cardiac arrest; all haemodynamic adverse events occurred in piglets with plasma concentrations greater than 1 μg/l. Dexmedetomidine clearance was 0.126 l/kg/h [coefficient of variation (CV) 46.6.%] and volume of distribution was 3.37 l/kg (CV 191%). Dexmedetomidine clearance was reduced by 32.7% at a temperature of 33.5°C. Dexmedetomidine clearance was reduced by 55.8% following hypoxia-ischaemia. CONCLUSIONS: Dexmedetomidine clearance was reduced almost tenfold compared with adult values in the newborn piglet following hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and subsequent therapeutic hypothermia. Reduced clearance was related to cumulative effects of both hypothermia and exposure to hypoxia. High plasma levels of dexmedetomidine were associated with major cardiovascular complications.

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  • Open loop optogenetic control of simulated cortical epileptiform activity

    Selvaraj, P; Sleigh, James; Freeman, WJ; Kirsch, HE; Szeri, AJ (2014-06)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    We present a model for the use of open loop optogenetic control to inhibit epileptiform activity in a meso scale model of the human cortex. The meso scale cortical model first developed by Liley et al. (2001) is extended to two dimensions and the nature of the seizure waves is studied. We adapt to the meso scale a 4 state functional model of Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) ion channels. The effects of pulsed and constant illumination on the conductance of these ion channels is presented. The inhibitory cell population is targeted for the application of open loop control. Seizure waves are successfully suppressed and the inherent properties of the optogenetic channels ensures charge balance in the cortex, protecting it from damage.

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  • V. 'For now we see through a glass, darkly': the anaesthesia syndrome

    Sanders, RD; Absalom, A; Sleigh, JW; ConsCIOUS Group (2014-05)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Simplified windborne debris equations in strong winds

    Richards, Peter (2014-02-01)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Approximate solutions are derived for the flight of compact wind borne debris in strong winds. The relevant characteristics of the piece of debris are combined together into the ballistic coefficient. The solutions are put into a non-dimensional form which leads to a set of universal silutions which can be plotted in a manner such that one set of graphs applies to all sizes of debris and wind strength situations. The derived equations are used to show that most common types of debris can easily achieve 40% of the wind speed and in some cases can reach much higher levels.

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  • Anti-consumption and consumer wellbeing: ICAR Proceedings 2014

    Lee, Michael; Hoffmann, S (2014)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    Anti-Consumption in the Sailing City Consumption today is an essential part of living. In almost every context, we are consumers. We fulfill our needs via consumption, we express our identities via consumption, we define our social status via consumption, and we regulate our emotions via consumption. Yet, most of us agree that there are good reasons to practice anti-consumption; the deliberate act of rejecting, reducing, or reclaiming consumption (Lee, Cherrier, Roux, and Cova 2011). For the most critical among us, consumption is a kind of alienation from natural living and these anti-consumers refrain from satisfying artificial needs, choosing instead to reconnect with their ‘roots’ by downgrading consumption. Of course most of us subscribe to the claim that humankind needs to diminish consumption to decrease environmental degradation. And often it is a moral obligation to - at least temporarily - abandon consumption of specific products and brands to stop supporting companies which act socially or environmentally irresponsibly (Hoffmann 2013). There are surely even more reasons why it might be a good idea for everyone to reject, reduce, or reclaim consumption in some or another way. Yet, there is one essential question that crosses every mind when we think about anti-consumption: Can we consume less and feel good? Given the many virtuous reasons for anti-consumption are simultaneously accompanied by a generally low willingness to actually reduce consumption, this question seems highly relevant. The International Center for Anti-consumption Research (ICAR) is the international forum for discussing relevant anti-consumption issues. This year in early July, when the ICAR network meets in Kiel, we jointly explore the link between anti-consumption and consumer well-being. Hopefully we will learn whether we can feel good although we practice anti-consumption. Or whether we feel good because we practice anti-consumption. The links between the different forms of anti-consumption practices (e.g., voluntary simplicity, boycotting, brand avoidance) and different aspects of well-being (e.g., social, financial, mental; Sirgy, Lee, and Rahtz 2007) are diverse, complex, and colorful. And it is fascinating to observe the evolution of new lifestyles and several new forms of (anti-)consumption that try to realize the positives of consumption reduction without imposing burdens for the individual. We are thinking for example of the carrotmob or the growing relevance of different sharing concepts (Belk 2010; Hutter and Hoffmann 2013). The ICAR symposium has historically been accompanied with a special issue in an internationally recognized journal. Dr Michael S W Lee, the founder and organizer of the ICAR network, has launched former special issues in the Journal of Business Research, Consumption Markets and Culture, the European Journal of Marketing, and the Journal of Macromarketing. This time, the Journal of Consumer Affairs (JOCA) has provided us with the opportunity to publish a special issue. We are very thankful to the editor in chief, Sharon Tennyson, who welcomed and enabled this cooperation to occur. We believe that there could not be a better match between JOCA and the symposium theme, since the JOCA focusses on consumer interests and well-being. One goal and characteristic of the ICAR network is the objective to jointly improve our work on anti-consumption, and to this end the ICAR symposium acts as a kind of paper clinic. We encouraged authors to submit their work early to get initial first feedback from the organizers. Authors then had the opportunity to make an early submission to JOCA to receive reviewer feedback before the ICAR symposium without the risk of being rejected at this early stage. At the ICAR symposium, the delegates again will receive more feedback from fellow delegates. After three pre-submission feedback loops the actual journal submission process starts, with the official deadline for the JOCA special issue being set for August the 30th 2014. We hope that this extensive improvement process originates impactful work in the field of anti-consumption. For us, the Marketing department of Kiel University, it is a great pleasure to host ICAR here in Kiel! You know that the heart of ICAR beats in Auckland (New Zealand), which is known as the City of Sails, interestingly Kiel is called the Sailing City. Therefore it is imperative that we go on a sailing trip during the ICAR symposium. We are looking forward to a good trip with you and it gives us great pleasure to warmly welcome everyone to jointly knit the ICAR net! Stefan Hoffmann, Kiel University Michael SW Lee, University of Auckland

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