5,078 results for 2015

  • Supporting lower-achieving seven-and-eight-year-old children with place value understandings

    Bailey, Judy (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The article focuses on the importance of listening to children to identify their current understandings and developing on them systematically, using the materials, to promote a conceptual understanding. It mentions that classroom teachers are responsible for supporting children in their class even when the children represent mathematical understandings and competence.

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  • He Matapihi Mā Mua, Mō Muri: The Ethics, Processes, and Procedures Associated with the Digitization of Indigenous Knowledge—The Pei Jones Collection

    Whaanga, Hēmi; Bainbridge, David; Anderson, Michela; Scrivener, Korii; Cader, Papitha; Roa, Tom; Keegan, Te Taka Adrian Gregory (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The digital era has transformed how people live their lives and interact with the world and knowledge systems around them. In Aotearoa/New Zealand a range of initiatives incorporating Indigenous knowledge have been implemented to collect, catalog, maintain, and organize digital objects. In this article, we report on the ethics, processes, and procedures associated with the digitization of the manuscripts, works, and collected taonga (treasures) of the late Dr. Pei Te Hurinui Jones—and describe how it was transformed into a digital library. It discusses the decision-making processes and the various roles and responsibilities of the researchers, family members, and institute in this process.

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  • Longitudinal magnetic resonance spectroscopy and cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease

    Almuqbel, M.; Melzer, T.R.; Myall, D.J.; MacAskill, M.R.; Livingston, L.; Wood, K-L.; Pitcher, T.L.; Keenan, R.J.; Dalrymple-Alford, J.C.; Anderson, T.J. (2015)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Unequal effects of anterior thalamic nuclei and mammillothalamic tract lesions

    Perry, B.A.L.; Mercer, S.A.; Barnett, S.C.; Hamilton, J.J.; Dalrymple-Alford, J.C. (2015)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Puer tea: Ancient caravans and urban chic [Book Review]

    Galikowski, Maria (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book “ Puer Tea: Ancient Caravans and Urban Chic" by Jinghong Zhang.

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  • Tea in china: A religious and cultural history [Book Review]

    Galikowski, Maria (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book “Tea in china: A religious and cultural history" by James A Benn.

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  • The Effect of Vibration and Low-Frequency Audio on Full-Body Haptic Sensations

    Kruijff, E.; Trepkowski, C.; Lindeman, R.W. (2015)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    We report on two experiments that deploy low-frequency audio and strong vibrations to induce haptic-like sensations throughout the human body. Vibration is quite frequently deployed in immersive systems, for example to provide collision feedback, but its actual effects are not well understood [Kruijff & Pander 2005; Kruijff et al. 2015]. The starting point of our experiments was a study by Rasmussen [Rasmussen 1982], which found that different vibration frequencies were experienced differently throughout the body. We will show how vibrations affect sensations throughout the body and may provide some directional cues to some parts of the body, yet also illustrate the difficulties.

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  • Engineering Geology Education for the 21st Century

    Villeneuve, M.C.; Zimmer, V.L.; Eggers, M.J.; Bell, D.H.; Davies, T.R.; Pettinga, J.R. (2015)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    A sound background in geology is necessary if geomechanics is to address the changing face of the Earth as shown by recent geohazard events, by continued urban, infrastructure and resource development, and by climate change both in New Zealand and internationally. Engineering geologists provide this background in nearly every engineering consultancy, resource extraction and government institution in Australasia. We have used recent developments in post-secondary geo-education to create a learning experience that meets the demands of the modern professional engineering geologist. We are developing a revised programme of study that makes use of online and block learning, accommodating a societal need for distance learning. Online interaction with lecturers and fellow students will be used for delivery of subject fundamentals, while application of the concepts to practical examples will be undertaken during short, intensive blocks. This structure will require students to both learn and prepare independently, and increase the amount of experiential learning through project work and involvement with industry. We present four teaching and assessment techniques that are well suited to delivery through online and block formats, while ensuring that students gain the technical and professional knowledge and skills expected of engineering geologists. Online lecture delivery through interactive podcasts allows students to study the lecture material at a distance, but we stress that this must be coupled with face-to-face time. We use field work, group work and problem solving to allow students to reach the higher levels of learning technical material, such as synthesis and evaluation, while gaining professional skills.

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  • Experiencing a mathematical problem-solving teaching approach: Opportunities to identify ambitious teaching practices

    Bailey, Judy; Taylor, Merilyn (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Learning to teach is a complex matter, and many different models of pre-service teacher education have been used to support novice teachers in preparation for the classroom. More recently there have been calls for embedding practice at the centre of teachers’ professional preparation. Preparing novice teachers for ambitious teaching is demanding. A focus on core high-leverage practices such as teaching through problem-solving are suggested. In this study novice teachers engaged in practice-based teacher education to explore the learning and teaching of mathematics using a problem-solving approach. Findings suggest experiencing this approach is an important first step towards novice teachers learning about practices congruent with current reform expectations such as justifying mathematical reasoning, emphasising conceptual understanding, and catering for all learners. Novice teachers also began to envisage how ambitious mathematics pedagogies could be enacted in their future practice.

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  • A process mining technique using pattern recognition

    Liesaputra, Veronica; Yongchareon, Sira; Chaisiri, Sivadon (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Several works have proposed process mining techniques to discover process models fromevent logs. With the existing works, mined models can be built based on analyzing the relationship between any two events seen in event logs. Being restricted by that, they can only handle special cases of routing constructs and often produce unsound models that do not cover all of the traces in the logs. In this paper, we propose a novel technique for process mining based on using a pattern recognition technique called Maximal Pattern Mining (MPM). Our MPM technique can handle loops (of any length), duplicate tasks, non-free choice constructs, and long distance dependencies. Furthermore, by using the MPM, the discovered models are generally much easier to understand.

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  • Ongoing development of a near-surface shear wave velocity (Vs) model for Christchurch using a region-specific CPT-Vs correlation

    McGann, C.R.; Bradley, B.A.; Cubrinovski, M. (2015)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper summarizes the development of a region-wide surficial shear wave velocity model based on the combination of the large high-spatial-density database of cone penetration test (CPT) logs in and around Christchurch, New Zealand and a recently-developed Christchurch-specific empirical correlation between soil shear wave velocity and CPT. The ongoing development of this near-surface shear wave velocity model has applications for site characterization efforts via the development of maps of time-averaged shear wave velocities over specific depths, and the identification of regional similarities and differences in soil shear stiffness.

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  • Forecasting the Term Structure of Implied Volatilities

    Guo, Biao; Han, Qian; Lin, Hai (2015)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Neumann and Skiadopoulos (2013) document that although the implied volatilities are predictable, their economic pro ts become insignificant once the cost is accounted for. We show that the trading strategies based on the predictability of implied volatilities could generate significant risk-adjusted returns after controlling for the transaction cost. The implied volatility curve information is useful for the out-of-sample forecast of implied volatilities up to one week. Short-maturity implied volatilities tend to be more predictable than long-maturity implied volatilities. Although the long-maturity options are much less traded than the short-maturity options, their implied volatilities provide much more information on the price discovery.

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  • Preface to the special section "Michael A. Peters and Educational Leadership"

    Peters, Michael A. (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    I started writing a Preface that became a study in a genre that is defined as the novel of educational self-formation together with the various other kinds of literature that this genre – the Bildungsroman – generated that focused on the question of self-transformation. It was evident that the Bildungsroman developed as a genre in the air of German idealism and in relation to the same philosophical concerns that informed the Humboldtian university. The specific form of the novel of educational self-formation was primarily a story of ethical self-constitution. Both and genre and the institution seemed to belong to the same universe. Today in many parts of the neoliberal world this ideal and sentiment – this vision of education – seems hopelessly quaint and out of place. Philosophy is no longer the centre of the institution and the humanities are rapidly shrinking. Subjects like theology and philology have mostly disappeared; the study of literature holds its ground but often given way to media or creative studies focused on web design. The professional schools like engineering, law, medicine and teaching seem to be doing well but the big winners in the current environment are business, technology and science even after the global financial crash.

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  • Characterisation of the TNF superfamily members CD40L and BAFF in the small-spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula)

    Li, Ronggai; Redmond, Anthony K.; Wang, Tiehui; Bird, Steve; Dooley, Helen; Secombes, Chris J. (2015-11)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The tumour necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) members CD40L and BAFF play critical roles in mammalian B cell survival, proliferation and maturation, however little is known about these key cytokines in the oldest jawed vertebrates, the cartilaginous fishes. Here we report the cloning of CD40L and BAFF orthologues (designated ScCD40L and ScBAFF) in the small-spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula). As predicted both proteins are type II membrane-bound proteins with a TNF homology domain in their extracellular region and both are highly expressed in shark immune tissues. ScCD40L transcript levels correlate with those of TCRα and transcription of both genes is modulated in peripheral blood leukocytes following in vitro stimulation. Although a putative CD40L orthologue was identified in the elephant shark genome the work herein is the first molecular characterisation and transcriptional analysis of CD40L in a cartilaginous fish. ScBAFF was also cloned and its transcription characterised in an attempt to resolve the discrepancies observed between spiny dogfish BAFF and bamboo shark BAFF in previously published studies.

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  • Exhibitions and the Development of Modern Planning Culture, edited by Robert Freestone and Marco Amati [book review]

    Haarhoff, Errol (2015)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • “Kōkiritia i roto i te kotahitanga”: A Process Evaluation of a Wraparound Programme at Te Whānau o Waipareira Trust

    Tamihere, Christina (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    In New Zealand, youth offending has become a significant problem; a problem that has led to the promotion and development of programmes which aim to prevent and reduce youth crime. The Wraparound model of care is one that aims to address this issue. It is a relatively new concept in New Zealand, one that has very promising outcomes but has not yet been given the opportunity to show its full potential. This thesis presents the findings of a process evaluation of Te Whanau O Waipareira Trust’s Wraparound Service (WWS). The evaluation aimed to describe the programme with a focus on cultural variables, identify strengths and weaknesses and to make recommendations for the improvement of the delivery of the service. This project utilised qualitative methods, including interviews, field observations and a review of programme documentation. A total of 23 people participated in this project, including 9 rangatahi, 4 whānau, 2 internal stakeholders, 3 external stakeholders and 5 kaimahi. The project ran over a period of approximately 18 months and was based at Te Whānau o Waipareira Trust. Results indicated (a) a high level of satisfaction by rangatahi; (b) engagement in the WWS was facilitated by collaborating and communicating with whānau, the quality of the rangatahi-kaimahi relationship and the provision of attractive resources, (c) strong emotional connection in being able to identify with a Māori service, (d) a high quality of staffing, (e) a high-level of tikanga incorporated into the service, (f) an issue of infidelity as established by the National Wraparound Initiative and (g) the importance of strong organizational structure, process, leadership and support for staff. The results are discussed in terms of programme recommendations for the improvement of the Wraparound service. This study will make a unique contribution to the successful implementation of Wraparound services in the Aotearoa context, which in the past has been largely overlooked and under researched. It will have further implications on the factors involved in engaging Rangatahi and Whānau Māori in social services and may also provide a framework of comparison for the development of Whānau Ora in Aotearoa.

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  • Functional significance of external trap morphology in aquatic Utricularia

    Gardiner, Corin (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Utricularia is a genus of carnivorous plants with mechanically activated suction traps. Species are largely generalist, opportunistic predators with very plastic vegetative growth. They variously occupy terrestrial, aquatic and epiphytic habitats and can respond to changes in their environment by altering their investment in carnivory. Their traps are adorned with external appendages, the morphology of which varies greatly among species, carrying both phylogenetic and growth-habit specific signals. While this morphological variation is well documented, little is known about its functional significance. One hypothesis with limited support is that the appendage morphology of aquatic species is under selection for prey attraction. Previous work has shown that appendages of one aquatic clade, antennae and bristles, enhance the capture of one microcrustacean species. There has also been very little work done to quantify the plasticity of aquatic appendage expression, either among conspecifics or in response to environmental variation. Additionally, while studies have examined the effects of biotic and abiotic environmental variation on the growth and investment in carnivory of aquatic Utricularia, the effect of prey-derived mineral nutrition on plant growth has remained confounded with that of ambient nutrition. In this thesis I revisit the prey-capture enhancement hypothesis and look for plasticity in the appendage expression of aquatic Utricularia. Firstly, I conduct appendage ablation experiments on two aquatic Utricularia species with different growth habits, U. australis and U. gibba, to test the aquatic-appendage prey-capture hypothesis with a range of ubiquitous prey animals that exhibit differing feeding and locomotory behaviours. Aquatic appendages only enhance the trapping of prey taxa with specific feeding behaviour. Secondly, I conduct a growth experiment which produces the first experimental evidence of appendage expression changing in response to environmental variation, and demonstrate persistent differences in appendage expression between clones of the same species. Finally, with a second growth experiment, I examine the relative contributions of ambient and prey-derived nutrition to growth and investment in carnivory of U. australis. Prey capture plays a larger role in enhancing plant growth than ambient nutrition. I found little support for the aquatic prey-capture hypothesis. The capture rates of three ubiquitous prey taxa are unaffected by the presence of appendages. The degree of persistent appendage variation in between tested individuals is slight and therefore may not be functionally significant. Antennae and bristle expression is affected by environment but responses are not consistent with being an investment in carnivory.

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  • The history and practice of lying in public life

    Peters, Michael A. (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This paper provides an introduction to the history and practice of lying in public life. The paper argues that such an approach is required to balance the emphasis on truth and truth-telling. Truth and lies, truth-telling and the practice of lying are concepts of binary opposition that help define one another. The paper reviews Foucault's work on truth-telling before analyzing the "culture of lying" and its relation to public life by focusing on Arendt's work.

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  • Te reo Maori, philosophy and colonialism: A conversation with Maori philosopher Carl Mika

    Peters, Michael A.; Mika, Carl Te Hira (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Kia ora Carl Some advice if you have the time... I have been asked to give a paper at Uppsala on philosophy of language and autonomy. I want to focus on colonialism and use some examples from the colonial history concerning te reo Maori. I did a little research at the time of the Royal Commission in 1988 but have lost touch with the literature. Are there a couple of strategic texts you would recommend? Nga Mihi Kia ora Michael You tend to get two types of writing about the language: its revitalisation; and its link to the natural or spiritual worlds – which is to do with philosophy in a particular sense, but in my view doesn’t have an eye towards the “autonomy” part you raise (i.e. isn’t cognisant enough of colonialism). The latter writing theorises around the traditional place of language, or describes it as a traditional phenomenon. I’ve been considering writing something for some time on it, but just haven’t gotten around to it. You could discuss it in terms of how current uses of it in government policy etc. force the Maori language to become no more or no less than its English counterpart. So, for instance, language is an arbitrary (Saussure) thing that has very little in the way of “essence” in its own (autonomous) right. Terms like “whakapapa” equate precisely with “genealogy” but their interconnecting sense is lost in that translation. From a Maori belief, it could be argued that everything contains an essence, including words, and this essence precedes our interaction with language. In a way, language very much opens up a worldview, including the autonomy or essence of things in the world and their interconnectedness. pp. 101–110

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  • On narratives of self-formation and education

    Peters, Michael A. (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    In this paper I begin with Schleiermacher review and analyze the origins of the Humboldtian model of the modern German university as an influential kind of institution that was adopted in many parts of Europe, the US and beyond. The novel of education and of ethical self-formation came to provide a novelistic depicted of the essential human becoming of the hero protagonist and engendered a new genre that spread throughout the world. The paper asks the question where and what might be the novel of the neoliberal university in an age when the humanistic requirement has fallen away and students have become “customers” purchasing an educational service. Is there a novel of the neoliberal university that does not end- lessly replicate the logic of the marketplace but actually intervenes in material reality to “save” the institution? JEL codes: H52; H75; I21; I23 Keywords: Humboldt; Schleiermacher; Fichte; German University; Bildungsroman; Erziehungsroman; Morgenstern; Bakhtin; novel of education; self-formation, educational self-transformation

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