5,063 results for 2015

  • Exhibitions and the Development of Modern Planning Culture, edited by Robert Freestone and Marco Amati [book review]

    Haarhoff, Errol (2015)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • “Kōkiritia i roto i te kotahitanga”: A Process Evaluation of a Wraparound Programme at Te Whānau o Waipareira Trust

    Tamihere, Christina (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    In New Zealand, youth offending has become a significant problem; a problem that has led to the promotion and development of programmes which aim to prevent and reduce youth crime. The Wraparound model of care is one that aims to address this issue. It is a relatively new concept in New Zealand, one that has very promising outcomes but has not yet been given the opportunity to show its full potential. This thesis presents the findings of a process evaluation of Te Whanau O Waipareira Trust’s Wraparound Service (WWS). The evaluation aimed to describe the programme with a focus on cultural variables, identify strengths and weaknesses and to make recommendations for the improvement of the delivery of the service. This project utilised qualitative methods, including interviews, field observations and a review of programme documentation. A total of 23 people participated in this project, including 9 rangatahi, 4 whānau, 2 internal stakeholders, 3 external stakeholders and 5 kaimahi. The project ran over a period of approximately 18 months and was based at Te Whānau o Waipareira Trust. Results indicated (a) a high level of satisfaction by rangatahi; (b) engagement in the WWS was facilitated by collaborating and communicating with whānau, the quality of the rangatahi-kaimahi relationship and the provision of attractive resources, (c) strong emotional connection in being able to identify with a Māori service, (d) a high quality of staffing, (e) a high-level of tikanga incorporated into the service, (f) an issue of infidelity as established by the National Wraparound Initiative and (g) the importance of strong organizational structure, process, leadership and support for staff. The results are discussed in terms of programme recommendations for the improvement of the Wraparound service. This study will make a unique contribution to the successful implementation of Wraparound services in the Aotearoa context, which in the past has been largely overlooked and under researched. It will have further implications on the factors involved in engaging Rangatahi and Whānau Māori in social services and may also provide a framework of comparison for the development of Whānau Ora in Aotearoa.

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  • Functional significance of external trap morphology in aquatic Utricularia

    Gardiner, Corin (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Utricularia is a genus of carnivorous plants with mechanically activated suction traps. Species are largely generalist, opportunistic predators with very plastic vegetative growth. They variously occupy terrestrial, aquatic and epiphytic habitats and can respond to changes in their environment by altering their investment in carnivory. Their traps are adorned with external appendages, the morphology of which varies greatly among species, carrying both phylogenetic and growth-habit specific signals. While this morphological variation is well documented, little is known about its functional significance. One hypothesis with limited support is that the appendage morphology of aquatic species is under selection for prey attraction. Previous work has shown that appendages of one aquatic clade, antennae and bristles, enhance the capture of one microcrustacean species. There has also been very little work done to quantify the plasticity of aquatic appendage expression, either among conspecifics or in response to environmental variation. Additionally, while studies have examined the effects of biotic and abiotic environmental variation on the growth and investment in carnivory of aquatic Utricularia, the effect of prey-derived mineral nutrition on plant growth has remained confounded with that of ambient nutrition. In this thesis I revisit the prey-capture enhancement hypothesis and look for plasticity in the appendage expression of aquatic Utricularia. Firstly, I conduct appendage ablation experiments on two aquatic Utricularia species with different growth habits, U. australis and U. gibba, to test the aquatic-appendage prey-capture hypothesis with a range of ubiquitous prey animals that exhibit differing feeding and locomotory behaviours. Aquatic appendages only enhance the trapping of prey taxa with specific feeding behaviour. Secondly, I conduct a growth experiment which produces the first experimental evidence of appendage expression changing in response to environmental variation, and demonstrate persistent differences in appendage expression between clones of the same species. Finally, with a second growth experiment, I examine the relative contributions of ambient and prey-derived nutrition to growth and investment in carnivory of U. australis. Prey capture plays a larger role in enhancing plant growth than ambient nutrition. I found little support for the aquatic prey-capture hypothesis. The capture rates of three ubiquitous prey taxa are unaffected by the presence of appendages. The degree of persistent appendage variation in between tested individuals is slight and therefore may not be functionally significant. Antennae and bristle expression is affected by environment but responses are not consistent with being an investment in carnivory.

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  • The history and practice of lying in public life

    Peters, Michael A. (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This paper provides an introduction to the history and practice of lying in public life. The paper argues that such an approach is required to balance the emphasis on truth and truth-telling. Truth and lies, truth-telling and the practice of lying are concepts of binary opposition that help define one another. The paper reviews Foucault's work on truth-telling before analyzing the "culture of lying" and its relation to public life by focusing on Arendt's work.

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  • Te reo Maori, philosophy and colonialism: A conversation with Maori philosopher Carl Mika

    Peters, Michael A.; Mika, Carl Te Hira (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Kia ora Carl Some advice if you have the time... I have been asked to give a paper at Uppsala on philosophy of language and autonomy. I want to focus on colonialism and use some examples from the colonial history concerning te reo Maori. I did a little research at the time of the Royal Commission in 1988 but have lost touch with the literature. Are there a couple of strategic texts you would recommend? Nga Mihi Kia ora Michael You tend to get two types of writing about the language: its revitalisation; and its link to the natural or spiritual worlds – which is to do with philosophy in a particular sense, but in my view doesn’t have an eye towards the “autonomy” part you raise (i.e. isn’t cognisant enough of colonialism). The latter writing theorises around the traditional place of language, or describes it as a traditional phenomenon. I’ve been considering writing something for some time on it, but just haven’t gotten around to it. You could discuss it in terms of how current uses of it in government policy etc. force the Maori language to become no more or no less than its English counterpart. So, for instance, language is an arbitrary (Saussure) thing that has very little in the way of “essence” in its own (autonomous) right. Terms like “whakapapa” equate precisely with “genealogy” but their interconnecting sense is lost in that translation. From a Maori belief, it could be argued that everything contains an essence, including words, and this essence precedes our interaction with language. In a way, language very much opens up a worldview, including the autonomy or essence of things in the world and their interconnectedness. pp. 101–110

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  • On narratives of self-formation and education

    Peters, Michael A. (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    In this paper I begin with Schleiermacher review and analyze the origins of the Humboldtian model of the modern German university as an influential kind of institution that was adopted in many parts of Europe, the US and beyond. The novel of education and of ethical self-formation came to provide a novelistic depicted of the essential human becoming of the hero protagonist and engendered a new genre that spread throughout the world. The paper asks the question where and what might be the novel of the neoliberal university in an age when the humanistic requirement has fallen away and students have become “customers” purchasing an educational service. Is there a novel of the neoliberal university that does not end- lessly replicate the logic of the marketplace but actually intervenes in material reality to “save” the institution? JEL codes: H52; H75; I21; I23 Keywords: Humboldt; Schleiermacher; Fichte; German University; Bildungsroman; Erziehungsroman; Morgenstern; Bakhtin; novel of education; self-formation, educational self-transformation

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  • A biopolítica pós-colonial no império do capital: Linhas foucaultianas de investigação nos Estudos Educacionais

    Peters, Michael A. (2015)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Conferência "A Biopolítica Pós-Colonial no Império do Capital: Linhas foucaultianas de investigação nos Estudos Educacionais" ministrada pelo Prof. Dr. Michael Peters – University of Illinois – EUA, no dia 22 de setembro de 2015.

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  • End tidal CO2 in recreational rebreather divers on surfacing after decompression dives

    Mitchell, SJ; Mesley, P; Hannam, JA (2015-01-01)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    INTRODUCTION: Deep dives using rebreather devices result in oxygen exposures that carry a risk of cerebral oxygen toxicity. Elevation of arterial CO2 levels increases this risk. CO2 retention may occur during the deep working phases of dives, but it has not been investigated in 'real world' dives at the end of resting decompression when oxygen exposures are peaking, often to levels higher than recommended maxima. METHODS: We conducted an observational field study to measure end tidal CO2 (Petco2) in divers surfacing after decompression. Sixteen rebreather divers conducted two dives and two completed one dive (a total of 34 dives) to depths ranging from 44-55 msw. Bottom times ranged from 35 to 56 min and time spent on decompression ranged from 40 to 92 min. The first breaths on reaching the surface after removing the rebreather mouthpiece were taken through a portable capnograph. The Petco2 was recorded for the first breath that produced a clean capnography trace. Petco2 measurement was repeated for each subject 2-3 h after diving to give paired observations. RESULTS: There were no differences between mean surfacing Petco2 [36.8 mmHg (SD 3.0)] and the mean Petco2 made later after diving [36.9 mmHg (SD 4.0)]. One subject on one dive returned a surfacing Petco2 higher than a nominal upper limit of 45 mmHg. DISCUSSION: We found no general tendency to CO2 retention during decompression. It is plausible that breaching oxygen exposure limits during resting decompression is less hazardous than equivalent breaches when exercising at deep depths. Mitchell SJ, Mesley P, Hannam JA. End tidal CO2 in recreational rebreather divers on surfacing after decompression dives.

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  • Where's the Sablefish?: Exploring causes of variable sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria) representation in Northwest Coast sites

    Nims, Reno; Butler, V (2015-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Interview with Michael Apple: The biography of a public intellectual

    Peters, Michael A. (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Michael W. Apple is the John Bascom Professor of Curriculum and Instruction and Educational Policy Studies in the Departments of Curriculum and Instruction (CI) and Educational Policy Studies (EPS) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Education where he has taught since 1970. Michael Apple is one of the foremost educational theorists in the world and a public intellectual who is deeply committed to empowerment and transformation of people through education. Professor Apple specializes in understanding and analyzing the relations between education and power. He has made major contributions to the fields of cultural politics, curriculum theory and research, and critical teaching. He has been a tireless advocate and activist-theorist for development of democratic schools over four decades. He began teaching in elementary and secondary schools in New Jersey where he grew up and served as president of the local teachers' union. He has spent his career working with educators, unions, dissident and disadvantaged groups throughout the world on democratizing educational policy and practice. Professor Apple's research centers on the limits and possibilities of critical educational policy and practice in a time of conservative restoration.

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  • Anxieties of knowing: Academic pathologies, critical philosophy and the culture of self

    Peters, Michael A. (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This exploratory paper coins the term “academic pathologies” to discuss in a critical approach the culture of the academic self focusing on what is called “anxieties of knowledge”. The paper plays with these themes in reference to the work of Kierkegaard, the American film director Woody Allen, and Jacques Derrida. This topic and paper has eluded me over the years as I tried to gapple with various formulations. The paper that follows the history of my failed attempts is an exercise in self-therapy, confession and self-examination about my continuing in- ability to produce this paper.

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  • The university in the epoch of digital reason: Fast knowledge in the circuits of cybernetic capitalism

    Peters, Michael A. (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article examines the university institutional in relation to the notion of time by postulating the concept of “the epoch of digital reason.” Within this epoch the university exhibits “fast knowledge” flows of knowledge in the circuits of “cybernetic capitalism.” The paper introduces the university on speed through the work of Paul Virilio and then in the next sections examines “the epoch of digital reason,” fast knowledge and fast capitalism and “the cybernetic hypothesis” including a conception of the university and “speed politics” within cybernetic capitalism.

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  • Marx, education and the possibilities of a fairer world: Reviving radical political economy through foucault

    Olssen, Mark; Peters, Michael A. (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Although this paper constitutes a revision of a paper originally published in 2007 [see note 1), the editors are pleased to republish this paper due to its theoretical importance for the critique of Marxism as well the interest it creates for establishing the possibility of a new political economy based upon the work of Michel Foucault. The paper documents and interrogates the contradictions between postmodernism and poststructuralism with Marxism. Starting by documenting the crisis of the Left at the start of the twenty-first century, an attempt is made to radically critique and reappraise Marxism in a direction set out by Foucault. The paper is not so much an attempt to meld Marxism and poststructuralism but rather to generate a new poststructuralist historical materialism which still has equality and fairness as its central concerns, but which goes beyond the traditional problems of Marxism based on its adherence to outmoded methodologies and theoretical modes of analysis. Echoing well known critiques of Marxist historical materialism, the paper focuses on forms of articulation drawn from the revolution in language influenced by post-modernism and by historically more recent post-quantum complexity theories.

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  • High Ground, Low Ground: Explorations in Topography and Neighbourliness in Coastal Dune Settlement.

    Wallis, Stephanie (2015)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The desire to live close to the ocean often brings about settlement that sprawls along the beachfront, parallel to the coastline. This settlement structure is problematic as it diminishes the importance of community while exposing beachfront housing to coastal hazards. The coastal dune settlements of Waikanae and Paraparaumu, where this research has been undertaken, exhibits this problematic settlement structure. Using these sites as a case study, the research seeks to re-examine the New Zealand coastal land settlement formation. It explores what could happen if the current coastal settlement pattern re-organised as a more social structure? The research is investigating an approach to settlement through re-examining the idea of neighbourhood by looking at its whole relation to the coastal dune topography, ecology, and wider landscape relations. However, not only does this research look at the social potentials of coastal settlement but how disaster planning can become a device to achieve this outcome. Essentially, it aligns itself with the attitude that flooding and coastal hazards should not just be looked at as an engineering problem but an opportunity to alter the way in which we settle coastlines in a way that builds community.

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  • Bounds on causal parameters of prospective ground motions and their effect on characteristics of selected ground motions

    Tarbali, K.; Bradley, B.A. (2015)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    In this study, the effect of considering bounds on causal parameters of prospective ground motions (e.g., magnitude, source-to-site distance, and site condition) for the purpose of ground-motion selection is investigated. Although using bounds on causal parameters is common practice in conventional approaches for ground motion selection, there is presently no consistent approach for setting these bounds as a function of the seismic hazard at the site. A rigorous basis is developed and sensitivity analyses performed for the consideration of bounds on magnitude, source-to-site distance, and site condition for use in ground motion selection. In order to empirically illustrate the effects of various causal parameter bounds on the characteristics of selected ground motions, 78 and 36 cases of scenario seismic hazard analysis (scenario SHA) and probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) are considered, which cover a wide range of causal parameters and site conditions. Ground motions are selected based on the generalized conditional intensity measure (GCIM) approach, which considers multiple ground motion intensity measures (IMs) and their variability in order to appropriately represent characteristics of the seismic hazard at the site. It is demonstrated that the application of relatively ‘wide’ bounds on causal parameters effectively removes ground motions with drastically different characteristics with respect to the target seismic hazard (improving computational efficiency in the selection process by reducing the subset of prospective records), and results in an improved representation of the target causal parameters. In contrast, the use of excessively ‘narrow’ bounds can lead to ground motion ensembles with a poor representation of the target IM distributions, especially for ground motions selected to represent PSHA results. As a result, the causal parameter bound criteria advocated in this study provide a good ‘default’ that is expected to be sufficient in the majority of problems encountered in seismic hazard and demand analyses.

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  • Noosphere rising: Internet-based collective intelligence, creative labour, and social production

    Peters, Michael A.; Reveley, James (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Our article relocates the debate about creative labour to the terrain of peer-to-peer interneting as the paradigmatic form of nonmarket - social - production. From Yann Moulier Boutang we take the point that creative labour is immaterial; it is expressed through people connected by the internet. Drawing on two social systems thinkers, Francis Heylighen and Wolfgang Hofkirchner, we transpose this connectedness up to a conception of creative labour as a supra-individual collective intelligence. This intelligence, we argue, is one of the internets emergent properties. We then present a model of internet development that flags the potential of digitally-evoked collective intelligence to facilitate what the Marxist philosopher George Caffentzis calls postcapitalist commoning. Yoking together systems theorizing about the internet and socialist envisioning of social transformation, we identify two sets of internet tools for coordination that can assist with the convivial reconstruction of society along the lines of peer-based production.

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  • Nutrient utilization, acquisition and distribution during embryonic, larval development and metamorphosis of the sea cucumber Australostichopus mollis (Holothuroidea: Aspidochirotida)

    Peters Didier, Josefina (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    The egg nutrient composition and utilization during embryonic and larval development of the holothuroid Australostichopus mollis are examined in the context of maternal investment of the Echinoderms. At the same time, this study assesses the influence of different microalgal diets on the nature and quantity of nutrients accumulated by the feeding auricularia larvae, leading to the identification of important nutrients for the successful completion of metamorphosis and juvenile formation. Nutrient composition of the egg, mainly represented by structural compounds (proteins and phospholipids), reflected well that of echinoderms with planktotrophic development, although A. mollis egg nutritional content was slightly lower than that of other echinoderms with similar egg size. Triacylglycerol (TAG) was the main energetic lipid provided by the mother in the egg to fuel the formation of the feeding larvae. More studies on the facultative feeding period (FFP) of A. mollis are required to establish if A. mollis have lower metabolic rates than other echinoderms, as appears to be the case of planktotrophic ophiuroids. After the onset of larval first feeding, the microalgal diet did not affect the type of lipids accumulated as a nutrient reserve. The microalgal diet did, however, affect the ability of the larvae to build energetic reserves. Dunaliella tertiolecta was found to be an unsuitable diet for A. mollis, while Chaetoceros muelleri led to increased larval lipid accumulation. In preparation for the perimetamorphic period, A. mollis accumulated free fatty acids (FFA) and the same maternally-derived energetic lipid, TAG. Feeding A. mollis auricularia larvae showed that the hyaline spheres (HS), unique holothuroid larval structures, played an important nutritional role during the A. mollis perimetamorphic period. HS were a good indicator of larval nutritional condition, and served as the main storage location for TAG accumulated from the diet. Lipids appeared to be transported from the digestive epithelium to the area of formation of the HS in a novel way, which involved the mobilization of lipids through the gel-filled blastocoel in specialized lipid transporting cells (LTC). TAG in the HS supported the formation of the fully functional juvenile. The information presented in this thesis, which shows the first nutritional data on eggs, larvae and juveniles of a planktotrophic holothurian, is not only valuable for studies of life-history theory, maternal investment and the field of larval biology, but has significant implications for sea cucumber aquaculture.

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  • Meeting of the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on immunization, October 2015 - conclusions and recommendations

    Turner, Nicola; Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (2015-12-11)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Strategic Advisory Group of Experts on immunization (SAGE)1 met on 20–22 October 2015. This report summarizes the discussions, conclusions and recommendations.

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  • Commercial decisions in the Supreme Court of New Zealand: The prominence of agency law in the first ten years

    Watts, Peter (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Spatial Point Processes and Moment Dynamics in the Life Sciences: A Parsimonious Derivation and Some Extensions

    Plank, M.J.; Law, R. (2015)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    Mathematical models of dynamical systems in 6 the life sciences typically assume that biological systems are spatially well mixed (the mean-field assumption). Even spatially explicit differential equation models typically make a local mean-field assumption. In effect, the assumption is that diffusive movement is strong enough to destroy spatial structure, or that interactions between individuals are sufficiently long-ranged that the effects of spatial structure are weak. However, many important biophysical processes, such as chemical reactions of biomolecules within cells, disease transmission among humans, and dispersal of plants, have characteristic spatial scales that can generate strong spatial structure at the scale of individuals, with important effects on the behaviour of biological systems. This calls for mathematical methods that in corporate spatial structure. Here we focus on one method, spatial-moment dynamics, which is based on the idea that important information about a spatial point process is held in its low-order spatial moments. The method goes beyond dynamics of the first moment, i.e. the mean density or concentration of agents in space, in which no information about spatial structure is retained. By including the dynamics of at least the second moment, the method retains some information about spatial structure. Whereas mean-field models effectively use a closure assumption for the second moment, spatial-moment models use a closure assumption for the third (or a higher-order) moment. The aim of the paper is to provide a parsimonious and intuitive derivation of spatial-moment dynamic equations that is accessible to non-specialists. The derivation builds naturally from the first moment to the second and we show how it can be extended to higher-order moments. Rather than tying the model to a specific biological example, we formulate a general model of movement, birth and death of multiple types of interacting agents. This model can be applied to problems from a range of disciplines, some of which we discuss. The derivation is performed in a spatially non-homogeneous setting, to facilitate future investigations of biological scenarios, such as invasions, in which the spatial patterns are non-stationary over space.

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