80,754 results

  • The significance of powder breakdown during conveying within industrial milk powder plants

    Boiarkina, Irina; Sang, C; Depree, N; Prince-Pike, Arrian; Yu, Wei; Wilson, DI; Young, BR (2016)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Instant whole milk powder is designed to rapidly dissolve in water, which depends on the particle size distribution (PSD). The fragile powder exiting the dryer is conveyed for packing which breaks down the particles, worsening the dissolution properties. This work investigated the effect of conveying on the final functional properties using two industrial plants with differing transport systems; a pneumatic system and bucket elevator. It was expected that the plant with the bucket elevator consistently produced powder with superior dissolution due to lower breakdown during transport. This was evaluated using the change in PSD. It was found that the plant with the bucket elevator had at least as large a change in the median particle size as the plant with the pneumatic transport system, contrary to the expectation. However, the plant with the bucket elevator had an initially larger particle size, and so the percentage of fine particles that negatively impact dissolution, remained low post transport. When quantified using the change in bulk density, having an initially low bulk density compensated for large increases in bulk density during conveying and powder with lower bulk density pre-transport showed better wettability post transport. Thus in order to produce powder with the desired functionalities the focus should be on improving the initial agglomeration and generating larger particles and lower bulk density pre-transport, as opposed to optimising the powder transport.

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  • Acoustic Echo and Noise Canceller for Personal Hands-Free Video IP Phone

    Fukui, M; Shimauchi, S; Hioka, Yusuke; Nakagawa, A; Hanead, Y (2016-11)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper presents implementation and evaluation of a proposed acoustic echo and noise canceller (AENC) for videotelephony-enabled personal hands-free Internet protocol (IP) phones. This canceller has the following features: noise-robust performance, low processing delay, and low computational complexity. The AENC employs an adaptive digital filter (ADF) and noise reduction (NR) methods that can effectively eliminate undesired acoustic echo and background noise included in a microphone signal even in a noisy environment. The ADF method uses the step-size control approach according to the level of disturbance such as background noise; it can minimize the effect of disturbance in a noisy environment. The NR method estimates the noise level under an assumption that the noise amplitude spectrum is constant in a short period, which cannot be applied to the amplitude spectrum of speech. In addition, this paper presents the method for decreasing the computational complexity of the ADF process without increasing the processing delay to make the processing suitable for real-time implementation. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed AENC suppresses echo and noise sufficiently in a noisy environment; thus, resulting in natural-sounding speech.

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  • Simplified windborne debris equations in strong winds

    Richards, Peter (2014-02-01)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Approximate solutions are derived for the flight of compact wind borne debris in strong winds. The relevant characteristics of the piece of debris are combined together into the ballistic coefficient. The solutions are put into a non-dimensional form which leads to a set of universal silutions which can be plotted in a manner such that one set of graphs applies to all sizes of debris and wind strength situations. The derived equations are used to show that most common types of debris can easily achieve 40% of the wind speed and in some cases can reach much higher levels.

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  • Delayed neuroprotection in the era of hypothermia: What can we add?

    Gunn, Alistair; Groenendaal, F (2016)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Despite the successful clinical translation of therapeutic hypothermia for perinatal encephalopathy into routine care, treatment is only partially effective. It is likely that this reflects the formidable challenges of initiating treatment for neonatal encephalopathy within a few hours after birth. In randomized controlled trials, cooling has been typically initiated at a mean of 4 to 5 h after birth. This is clearly not optimal, given accumulating evidence that cooling is significantly more effective when it can be initiated before 3 h. In this review, we propose that given the consistent evidence that milder hypoxic-ischemic injury is associated with slower evolution of damage, any future clinical trials of delayed treatment starting more than 6 h after an insult should target infants with milder encephalopathy. We then critically examine the evidence that erythropoietin is one of the most promising preclinical candidates either for co-treatment with the mild therapeutic hypothermia or to support neuroregeneration after the therapeutic window for acute neuroprotection.

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  • Measures of outcome in lung cancer screening: maximising the benefits

    Young, RP; Hopkins, Raewyn (2016-10)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    In their article, Miller and colleagues report on the survival results of smokers enrolled in their communitybased multicentre computed tomography (CT) screening program for lung cancer (1). In a cohort of 1,267 primarily moderate to high risk smokers, followed with annual CT screening for 5 years, 36 subjects underwent biopsy, 30 were confirmed to have lung cancer of which 28 were primary lung cancers. Overall 5-year survival was 64% and 5-year lung cancer specific survival was 71% in the screened patients, where the overall-survival compared favourably to the 5-year survival in a group of non-screened lung cancer patients (64% vs. 19% respectively, P<0.001) (1).

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  • A randomised controlled demonstration trial of multifaceted nutritional intervention and or probiotics: the healthy mums and babies (HUMBA) trial

    Okesene-Gafa, K; Li, M; Taylor, Rennae; Thompson, John; Crowther, Caroline; McKinlay, Christopher; McCowan, Lesley (2016-11-24)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background Maternal obesity is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and has lifelong negative implications for offspring health. The Institute of Medicine recommends limited gestational weight gain (GWG) in obese women for optimal maternal and infant outcomes. However, there is a gap regarding an effective and sustainable intervention strategy to achieve this goal. The aim of the healthy mums and babies (HUMBA) demonstration trial is to assess whether a multifaceted nutritional intervention and/or an oral probiotic treatment in obese pregnant women can reduce excessive GWG and optimise pregnancy outcomes. Methods and design The study is a two by two factorial randomised controlled demonstration trial conducted in Counties Manukau health region, New Zealand, a multi-ethnic region with a high prevalence of obesity. A total of 220 non-diabetic obese women with a singleton pregnancy will be recruited between 120 and 176 weeks. At recruitment, women are randomised to receive either a culturally tailored multifaceted dietary intervention or routine dietary advice, and either an oral probiotic or placebo capsule. Randomisation is undertaken via a web-based protocol, randomize.net, with a 1:1 ratio using stratification by body mass index (BMI) category (BMI of 30–34.9 or BMI ≥35 kg/m2). The dietary intervention includes 4 customised nutrition education visits by a trained community health worker combined with motivational text messaging. Probiotic capsules consist of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Bifidobacterium lactis BB12 at a dose of 7 × 109 colony-forming units one per day until birth. Probiotic and placebo capsules are identically pre-packed and labelled by a third party, and are prescribed in a double blinded fashion. Research assessments are conducted at enrolment, 28 weeks, 36 weeks, at birth and at 5 months post-delivery. The primary outcomes for the study are proportion of women with excessive GWG and infant birthweight. Discussion The HUMBA demonstration trial will assess the efficacy of a culturally tailored multifaceted dietary intervention and probiotic treatment in limiting excessive GWG and optimising birthweight in a multiethnic sample of obese pregnant women. If successful, either one or both of the interventions may be incorporated into future studies powered to investigate important pregnancy outcomes. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry registration number: ACTRN12615000400561, Universal Trial Number: U1111-1155-0409. Date registered: 29th April 2015.

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  • Comparison of seismic design provisions for buckling restrained braced frames in Canada, United States, Chile, and New Zealand

    Tremblay, R; Dehghani, M; Fahnestock, L; Herrera, R; Canales, M; Clifton, George; Hamid, Z (2016-11)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Seismic design provisions for buildings in Canada, the United States, Chile and New Zealand are presented for buckling restrained braced frames, with focus on design requirements for seismic stability. P-delta effects are explicitly considered in seismic design in Canada, the U.S. and New Zealand. In Chile, stability effects are limited by means of more stringent drift limits. The provisions are applied to a 9-storey building structure located in areas in each country having similar seismic conditions. For this structure, comparable seismic loads are specified in Canada and Chile, whereas significantly lower seismic effects are prescribed in the U.S. In all countries, use of the dynamic (response spectrum) analysis method resulted in lighter and more flexible structures compared to the equivalent static force procedure. Seismic stability requirements had greater impact on designs in Canada and New Zealand. Frame design in the U.S. was only affected by stability effects when applying the stability requirements from AISC 360-10.

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  • Non-English major postgraduates’ English learning needs:A perspective from the Output-driven Hypothesis

    Shen, Y; Zhang, Lawrence; Pan, H (2016-11-18)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Curriculum development for EFL education needs to be based on learner needs. From the perspective of Output-driven Hypothesis, we conducted a questionnaire survey of learning needs and interests among non-English major postgraduates at a national key university. The results showed 1) a majority of participants were strongly motivated to learn English, with a particularly strong interest in improving their productive language skills 2) there were significant disciplinary differences in the perceptions of reading, writing and translation skills 3) there were notable discrepancies between the perceived importance of macro language skills and self-reported interested courses. The study further put forward that English curriculum design for non-English major postgraduates should be based on disciplinarity and learner needs, be oriented around production skills, and holistically meet diverse learner needs. 本研究从“输出驱动假设”视角对吉林省某重点高校非英语专 业研究生的英语学习需求进行问卷调查,结果显示:(1)研究生有提高英语输出能力的迫切需求;(2)理工和人文学科背景的研究生对英语阅读、写作和翻译技 能的认识存在显著性差异;(3)研究生对英语技能的重视程度与需求程度并不完全相符。研究进而提出研究生公共英语课程设置应基于学科专业性和学生需求,以 “输出”为导向,整体上满足学生的多样化学习需求。

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  • Multidirectional In Vivo Characterization of Skin Using Wiener Nonlinear Stochastic System Identification Techniques

    Parker, Matthew; Jones, LA; Hunter, IW; Taberner, Andrew; Nash, Martyn; Nielsen, Poul (2016-11-04)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    A triaxial force-sensitive microrobot was developed to dynamically perturb skin in multiple deformation modes, in vivo. Wiener static nonlinear identification was used to extract the linear dynamics and static nonlinearity of the force–displacement behavior of skin. Stochastic input forces were applied to the volar forearm and thenar eminence of the hand, producing probe tip perturbations in indentation and tangential extension. Wiener static nonlinear approaches reproduced the resulting displacements with variances accounted for (VAF) ranging 94–97%, indicating a good fit to the data. These approaches provided VAF improvements of 0.1–3.4% over linear models. Thenar eminence stiffness measures were approximately twice those measured on the forearm. Damping was shown to be significantly higher on the palm, whereas the perturbed mass typically was lower. Coefficients of variation (CVs) for nonlinear parameters were assessed within and across individuals. Individual CVs ranged from 2% to 11% for indentation and from 2% to 19% for extension. Stochastic perturbations with incrementally increasing mean amplitudes were applied to the same test areas. Differences between full-scale and incremental reduced-scale perturbations were investigated. Different incremental preloading schemes were investigated. However, no significant difference in parameters was found between different incremental preloading schemes. Incremental schemes provided depth-dependent estimates of stiffness and damping, ranging from 300 N/m and 2 Ns/m, respectively, at the surface to 5 kN/m and 50 Ns/m at greater depths. The device and techniques used in this research have potential applications in areas, such as evaluating skincare products, assessing skin hydration, or analyzing wound healing.

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  • Doing it together: a story from the co-production field

    Kidd, Jacqueline; Edwards, G (2016)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Purpose – Co-production in the context of mental health research has become something of a buzzword to indicate a project where mental health service users and academics are in a research partnership. The notion of partnership where one party has the weight of academic tradition on its side is a contestable one, so in this paper the authors “write to understand” (Richardson and St Pierre, 2005) as the purpose of this paper is to examine the experiences of working in a co-produced research project that investigated supported housing services for people with serious mental health problems. Design/methodology/approach – The authors set out to trouble the notion of co-produced research though a painfully honest account of the project, while at the same time recognising it as an idea whose time has come and suggesting a framework to support its implementation. Findings – Co-production is a useful, albeit challenging, approach to research. Originality/value – This paper is particularly relevant to researchers who are endeavouring to produce work that challenges the status quo through giving voice to people who are frequently silenced by the research process.

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  • Linking Design Model with Code

    Eckert, C; Cham, Brian; Sun, Jing; Dobbie, Gillian; Li, P (2016-11)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    With the growing in size and complexity of modern computer systems, the need for improving the quality at all stages of software development has become a critical issue. The current software production has been largely dependent on manual code development. Despite the slow development process, the errors introduced by the programmers contribute to a substantial portion of defects in the final software product. Model-driven engineering (MDE), despite having many advantages, is often overlooked by programmers due to lack of proper understanding and training in the matter. This paper investigates the advantages and disadvantages of MDE and looks at research results showing the adoption rates of design models. It analyzes different tools used for automated code generation and displays the reasons that led to technical decisions such as the programming language or design model used. In light of the findings, an educational tool, namely Lorini, was developed to provide automated code generation from the design models. The implemented tool consists of a plug-in for the Astah framework aimed at teaching Java programming to students through UML diagrams. It features instantaneous code generation from three types of UML diagrams, code-diagram matching, a feedback panel for error displays and on-the-fly compilation and execution of the resulting program. We also explore the possibility of generating assertion constraints from the design model and use them to verify the implementation. Evaluation of the tool indicated it to be successful with unique educational features and intuitive to use.

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  • Expatriate selection: A historical overview and criteria for decision-making

    Ott, DL; Michailova, S (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Purpose: The International Human Resource Management literature has paid less attention to the selection of expatriates and the decision-making criteria with regard to such selection, than to issues relating to expatriates' role, performance, adjustment, success, and failure. Yet, before expatriates commence their assignments, they need to be selected. The purpose of this book chapter is to provide an overview of issues related specifically to expatriate selection. In particular, the chapter traces the chronological development of selection over the last five decades or so, from prior to 1970 until present. The chapter subsequently identifies five expatriate selection criteria that have been applied in regard to traditional international assignments, but are also relevant to alternative assignments. Methodology/approach: We begin by reviewing expatriate selection historically and its position within expatriate management based on changing business environments. Then, drawing from over five decades of literature on international assignments, we identify and discuss five organizational, individual, and contextual level criteria for selecting expatriates. Findings: Emphasis on different issues tends to characterize expatriate selection during the various decades since the literature has taken up the topic. The chapter describes those issues, following a chronological perspective. In addition, the chapter organizes the various selection criteria in five clusters: organization philosophy, technical competence, relational abilities, personal characteristics, and spouse and family situation. Research limitations and practical implications: While there are studies on expatriate selection, there is more to be understood with regard to the topic. Provided all other expatriation phases are subsequent, if selection is not understood in detail, the foundations of studying phases and processes that take place once expatriates are selected may not be sound. While the scholarly conversations of other expatriate-related issues should continue, the international human resource management literature can absorb more analyses on selection. A better understanding of expatriate selection will assist its better management. The chapter provides a basis for human resource management professionals to be able to map the various criteria for selection, and decide, under particular circumstances, which ones to prioritize and why. Originality/value: The chapter brings clarity to a topic that has remained less researched when compared to other areas of interest related to expatriates and their international assignments by tracing the historical development of this important phase of the expatriation process. In addition, the chapter organizes a number of selection criteria along five core areas and discusses each of them to gain insights that help explain expatriate selection in greater detail.

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  • Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer: Answering the Most Important Question First

    Windsor, John (2016-08-17)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • We're catching fish but not value: why QMS needs reform

    Simmons, Glenn; Whittaker, D; Haworth, N (2016-08-29)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The transcriptional responses of cultured wound cells to the excretions and secretions of medicinal Lucilia sericata larvae

    Dauros Singorenko, P; Rosario, R; Windsor, John; Phillips, AR; Blenkiron, Cherie (2017-01)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Maggots, through their excretions and secretions (ES), promote wound healing by removing necrotic tissue, counter bacterial infection, and activate wound associated cells. We investigated the effects of a physiological dose of maggot ES on four wound-associated cell types in vitro with Affymetrix gene expression arrays; keratinocytes, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and monocytes. Keratinocytes showed the fewest (n = 5; p < 0.05, fold-change ±2) and smallest fold-changes (up to 2.32×) in gene expression and conversely THP1 monocytes had the most (n = 233) and greatest magnitude (up to 44.3×). There were no genes that were altered in all four cell-lines. Gene pathway analysis identified an enrichment of immune response pathways in three of the treated cell-lines. Analyses by quantitative RT-PCR found many genes dynamically expressed in ES dose dependent manner during the three day treatments. Phenotype analyses, however, found no effects of ES on cell viability, proliferation, migration and angiogenesis. ES was 100× less potent at triggering IL-8 secretion than fibroblasts treated with purified bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; in equivalent amounts to that found in ES; ∼40 EU/ml). Furthermore, co-treatment with LPS and ES decreased the LPS-alone triggered IL-8 secretion by 13%. Although ES had no direct effect on wound cell phenotypes it did partially reduce the immune response to bacterial LPS exposure. These observations were consistent with the profile of transcriptional responses that were dominated by modulation of immune response genes. Maggot therapy may therefore improve wound healing through the secondary effects of these gene changes in the wound cells.

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  • Anti-consumption and consumer wellbeing: ICAR Proceedings 2014

    Lee, Michael; Hoffmann, S (2014)

    Book
    The University of Auckland Library

    Anti-Consumption in the Sailing City Consumption today is an essential part of living. In almost every context, we are consumers. We fulfill our needs via consumption, we express our identities via consumption, we define our social status via consumption, and we regulate our emotions via consumption. Yet, most of us agree that there are good reasons to practice anti-consumption; the deliberate act of rejecting, reducing, or reclaiming consumption (Lee, Cherrier, Roux, and Cova 2011). For the most critical among us, consumption is a kind of alienation from natural living and these anti-consumers refrain from satisfying artificial needs, choosing instead to reconnect with their ‘roots’ by downgrading consumption. Of course most of us subscribe to the claim that humankind needs to diminish consumption to decrease environmental degradation. And often it is a moral obligation to - at least temporarily - abandon consumption of specific products and brands to stop supporting companies which act socially or environmentally irresponsibly (Hoffmann 2013). There are surely even more reasons why it might be a good idea for everyone to reject, reduce, or reclaim consumption in some or another way. Yet, there is one essential question that crosses every mind when we think about anti-consumption: Can we consume less and feel good? Given the many virtuous reasons for anti-consumption are simultaneously accompanied by a generally low willingness to actually reduce consumption, this question seems highly relevant. The International Center for Anti-consumption Research (ICAR) is the international forum for discussing relevant anti-consumption issues. This year in early July, when the ICAR network meets in Kiel, we jointly explore the link between anti-consumption and consumer well-being. Hopefully we will learn whether we can feel good although we practice anti-consumption. Or whether we feel good because we practice anti-consumption. The links between the different forms of anti-consumption practices (e.g., voluntary simplicity, boycotting, brand avoidance) and different aspects of well-being (e.g., social, financial, mental; Sirgy, Lee, and Rahtz 2007) are diverse, complex, and colorful. And it is fascinating to observe the evolution of new lifestyles and several new forms of (anti-)consumption that try to realize the positives of consumption reduction without imposing burdens for the individual. We are thinking for example of the carrotmob or the growing relevance of different sharing concepts (Belk 2010; Hutter and Hoffmann 2013). The ICAR symposium has historically been accompanied with a special issue in an internationally recognized journal. Dr Michael S W Lee, the founder and organizer of the ICAR network, has launched former special issues in the Journal of Business Research, Consumption Markets and Culture, the European Journal of Marketing, and the Journal of Macromarketing. This time, the Journal of Consumer Affairs (JOCA) has provided us with the opportunity to publish a special issue. We are very thankful to the editor in chief, Sharon Tennyson, who welcomed and enabled this cooperation to occur. We believe that there could not be a better match between JOCA and the symposium theme, since the JOCA focusses on consumer interests and well-being. One goal and characteristic of the ICAR network is the objective to jointly improve our work on anti-consumption, and to this end the ICAR symposium acts as a kind of paper clinic. We encouraged authors to submit their work early to get initial first feedback from the organizers. Authors then had the opportunity to make an early submission to JOCA to receive reviewer feedback before the ICAR symposium without the risk of being rejected at this early stage. At the ICAR symposium, the delegates again will receive more feedback from fellow delegates. After three pre-submission feedback loops the actual journal submission process starts, with the official deadline for the JOCA special issue being set for August the 30th 2014. We hope that this extensive improvement process originates impactful work in the field of anti-consumption. For us, the Marketing department of Kiel University, it is a great pleasure to host ICAR here in Kiel! You know that the heart of ICAR beats in Auckland (New Zealand), which is known as the City of Sails, interestingly Kiel is called the Sailing City. Therefore it is imperative that we go on a sailing trip during the ICAR symposium. We are looking forward to a good trip with you and it gives us great pleasure to warmly welcome everyone to jointly knit the ICAR net! Stefan Hoffmann, Kiel University Michael SW Lee, University of Auckland

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  • Goal-based Testing of Semantic Web Services

    Jokhio, M; Sun, J; Dobbie, G; Hu, T (2016-12-01)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Context: Recent years have witnessed growing interests in semantic web and its related technologies. While various frameworks have been proposed for designing semantic web services (SWS), few of them aim at testing. Objective: This paper investigates into the technologies for automatically deriving test cases from semantic web service descriptions based on the Web Service Modeling Ontology (WSMO) framework. Method: WSMO goal specifications were translated into B abstract machines. Test cases were generated via model checking with calculated trap properties from coverage criteria. Furthermore, we employed mutation analysis to evaluate the test suite. In this approach, the model-based test case generation and code-based evaluation techniques are independent of each other, which provides much more accurate measures of the testing results. Results: We applied our approach to a real-world case study of the Amazon E-Commerce Service (ECS). The experimental results have validated the effectiveness of the proposed solution. Conclusion: It is concluded that our approach is capable of automatically generating an effective set of test cases from the WSMO goal descriptions for SWS testing. The quality of test cases was measured in terms of their abilities to discover the injected faults at the code level. We implemented a tool to automate the steps for the mutation-based evaluation.

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  • Industry 4.0 and Cloud Manufacturing: A Comparative Analysis

    Liu, Y; Xu, Xun (2016-10-06)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Information technologies with their strong penetration can provide effective solutions for addressing the challenges faced by the manufacturing industry. Leveraging information technologies to enhance the competitiveness of the manufacturing industry has become a prominent trend worldwide. In this context, two important concepts for manufacturing - Industry 4.0 and cloud manufacturing - have been proposed. Industry 4.0 refers to the fourth industrial revolution, which is characterized by the widespread application of cyber-physical systems (CPS) in the manufacturing environment. Cloud manufacturing is a new service-oriented business paradigm based on the cloud concept and method. Since their inception, there has been a great deal of attention from both academia and industry. However, to date, they have largely been addressed in isolation. The fact is that, although being proposed from different perspectives and embracing different ideas, they each have some key features that can benefit one another. In order to better understand these two concepts, there is a need to compare them and clarify their relationship. To this end, this paper presents basic ideas of Industry 4.0 and cloud manufacturing, gives a brief overview of their current research, and provides a detailed comparative analysis of them from different perspectives.

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  • Мишель Фуко, Технология и Акторно-сетевая теория

    Matthewman, Steven (2016-11-02)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    В то время как значение Мишеля Фуко в качестве социального теоретика неоспоримо, его важность в качестве теоретика технологии часто забывают. В данной статье рассматриваются богатство и широта технологического мышления Фуко посредством исследования его работ и интервью, а также отслеживая его влияние в рамках акторно-сетевой теории (АСТ). Аргументация проводится таким образом, что мы не сможем в полной мере понимать Фуко без понимания центрального места технологии в его работах, и мы также не будем понимать АСТ без понимания Фуко.

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  • Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris spore inactivation by high pressure combined with mild heat: Modeling the effects of temperature and soluble solids

    Uchida, R; Oliveira, Maria (Mar 2017)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    High pressure processing (HPP) comprises the application of pressures between 100 and 1000 MPa to foods for microbial inactivation and food preservation. HPP has been commercially applied to pasteurize fruit juices with the advantage of retaining its bioactive constituents and original organoleptic properties. Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris has been suggested as a reference in the design of pasteurization for high-acid fruit products, due to spore resistance and spoilage incidents in fruit juices. In this study, A. acidoterrestris spore inactivation by 600 MPa combined with mild heat (35–65 °C) in malt extract broth adjusted to 10, 20 and 30 °Brix was carried out and the inactivation was modeled. The soluble solids increased the resistance of the spores to 600 MPa-thermal process, while the temperature decreased its resistance. Although the nonlinear Weibull model gave better fittings, the first-order kinetic parameters were also determined. For example for 600 MPa at 55 °C D10°Brix = 4.2 min, D20°Brix = 7.6 min, D30°Brix = 13.7 min, and zT-values were 20–21 °C. The z-values for the effect of soluble solids on DT-values were 39–40 °Brix for 45 and 55 °C 600 MPa HPP. The results obtained with broth were validated with fruit juices and concentrates. The combination of HPP with heat was an effective alternative to conventional thermal processing for the inactivation of A. acidoterrestris spores in juices up to 30 °Brix, allowing the use of less 30–40 °C of temperature for the same microbial inactivation, which potentially results in more nutritious, fresher and tastier juices/concentrates.

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