81,210 results

  • Characterisation of gold mineralisation and geophysical aided geological mapping in the Old Man Range, Central Otago, New Zealand

    Stephens, Samuel (2014)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Six structurally controlled gold deposits are hosted within two different structural blocks in the Old Man Range area. The mineralised lodes are hosted in normal faults which cut steeply across the host schistosity. In the East structural block, mineralised faults and the prominent joint set strike northwest and cut steeply across greenschist facies TZ III Caples Terrane schist. In the West structural block, mineralised faults and prominent joint sets strike eastwest and cut steeply across upper-greenschist facies TZ IV Wanaka lithologic association schist. These structural blocks are separated by the regional scale Old Man Fault. Orientation of hard rock gold deposits is closely linked to the prominent joints in host schist surrounding the deposits. Mineralised lodes formed along -1 m wide normal fault zones. They are discontinuous but can be traced for up to - l 50m, with variable thickness along strike. The lodes comprise brecciated silicified schist and hydrothermal quartz breccia, and minor quartz veins with abundant arsenopyrite. Open cavities with euhedral quartz crystals are common. Euhedral arsenopyrite occurs in quartz and silicified schist clasts within mineralised zones. Gold occurs as micro-particulate blebs in partly oxidised arsenopyrite, and as coarser free grains within quartz, micaceous laminae, micro-faults, and micro-shears within mineralised rock. Hydrothermal alteration is minor, comprises addition of Si, Au and As, and extends only a few centimetres from the mineralised lodes. Mineralisation may have occurred within a few kilometres of the surface during mid-Late Cretaceous extension (-106-lOlMa), with estimated formation temperatures between 200-350°C. The mineralised structures within the Old Man Range area are similar to other shallow level, post-metamorphic Otago gold deposits. Magnetic, magnetite bearing greenschist has a high magnetic response and can be successfully mapped using total magnetic intensity surveys over the Old Man Range area. Electromagnetic (EM) surveys can be used successfully to map post-metamorphic faults within the Old Man Range area, where they show up as linear conductive anomalies. These geophysical surveys are a useful tool for geologic mapping. However, there is no direct link between the geophysical features and gold mineralisation within the Old Man Range.

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  • Supporting the supporters : how adolescent females respond to a friend who engages in non-suicidal self-injury : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand

    Fisher, Kelly Alana (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a maladaptive coping strategy employed by young people in response to feelings of distress. Adolescents are more likely to communicate engagement in NSSI with their peers whom they turn to for support. How young people respond to peers engaging in self-harm, how this impacts the friendship, and how these supporters cope with assuming and administering this role are largely unknown. A qualitative methodology, Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), was chosen for this project in order to explore and understand the sense-making experiences of participants. Five female, Year 10 students from a single school in the Hawke’s Bay were interviewed. Five themes were identified including NSSI and relationships, burden and responsibility, the helping response, costs of caring, and supporter needs. The results highlighted the complex nature of this helping relationship and emphasised the need for increased and multifaceted forms of support to be provided to those responding to a peer engaging in self-harm. Young people indicated several factors that would be helpful to assist support providers to continue to help peers in distress including access to information about effective ways to support a friend engaging in NSSI and to be providing this support within a network that functions to resource and support the supporters. High schools are challenged to engage young people in the design and structure of student health and well-being services in their school, and the implementation of a student-led mentoring programme that caters for the support needs of the supporter is advocated.

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  • Katherine of Aragon : a "pioneer of women's education"? : humanism and women's education in early sixteenth century England : a thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in History at Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    Croon Hickman, Leanne (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    In 1548, Eaton School headmaster Nicolas Udall stated that “it was now a common thing to see young virgins so trained in the study of good letters, that they willingly set all other vain pastimes at naught, for learning sake.”1 What led to English women becoming educated enough to garner such an observation? The purpose of this study is to consider the changing attitudes towards the education of women that began with a proliferation of works written on the subject, by humanist scholars in 1520s England. It will be shown that during the 1520s a burgeoning number of works featuring theories on female learning were produced primarily in reaction to the need to educate Princess Mary as the only heir to the throne. As the driving force behind the writing of many of these works, Katherine of Aragon has been called “a pioneer of female education in England”. It will be considered whether this label is accurate and what other influences affected female education. This research will also provide an overview on the effects of these flourishing views on female education and how women were showing their learning in practice through iconography, book ownership and the writing activities that women engaged in.

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  • How usable is a smartphone with a Māori-language interface?

    Mato, Paora James; Keegan, Te Taka Adrian Gregory; Naera, Leilani (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Major languages dominate contemporary technologies. For Mäori, there is opportunity to engage with some technologies using their language and to participate within Mäori- language communities in various digital media. A smartphone launched by Two Degrees Mobile Limited provides a Mäori- language interface option. An initial pilot study indicated users will engage with this interface, but when pushed for time will switch the interface to the English- language option. This paper reports on a study undertaken to test the usability of the smartphone Mäorilanguage interface. Participants reported diffi culties and some frustration as they struggled with new words and unfamiliar uses of words. They also expressed disappointment at poor translations and arbitrary truncations. The feedback highlights perceived shortcomings encountered when technologies that are normally developed and used in a major language are translated for use in minority Indigenous languages. Mäori-language strategies that consider using translated application interfaces should be cognisant of such issues.

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  • Selective attention in dairy cattle

    Blackmore, Tania Louise; Temple, William; Foster, T. Mary (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    In a replication of Reynolds (1961), two cows learned to discriminate between compound stimuli in a forced choice procedure where pushing through a one-way gate marked with a red cross (S+) gave access to food. Pushing through a one-way gate marked with a yellow triangle (S−) gave no access to food. To investigate whether shape or colour was controlling behaviour, probe tests varied either the shape or the colour of the stimuli (e.g., a red vs. a yellow cross, and a red cross vs. a red triangle). Results suggested control by colour rather than shape, as the gate marked with the red stimulus was chosen more than the gate marked with the yellow stimulus regardless of stimulus shape, and when two shapes of the same colour (either red or yellow) were presented, cows chose both equally. Further probe tests with painted red, white, and yellow stimuli showed that the cows had learned to avoid yellow rather than to approach red, suggesting discriminative behaviour was controlled by the colour of the negative stimulus and not by either aspect of the positive stimulus. It is not clear why the negative stimulus was more salient, but it may reflect a tendency for cows to learn to avoid farm handling practices which involve mainly negative stimuli.

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  • The data privacy matrix project: towards a global alignment of data privacy laws

    Scoon, Craig; Ko, Ryan K.L. (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Data privacy is an expected right of most citizens around the world but there are many legislative challenges within a boundary-less cloud computing and World Wide Web environment. Despite its importance, there is limited research around data privacy law gaps and alignment, and the legal side of the security ecosystem which seems to be in a constant effort to catch-up. There are already issues within recent history which show a lack of alignment causing a great deal of confusion, an example of this is the 'right to be forgotten' case which came up in 2014. This case involved a Spanish man against Google Spain. He requested the removal of a link to an article about an auction for his foreclosed home, for a debt that he had subsequently paid. However, misalignment of data privacy laws caused further complications to the case. This paper introduces the Waikato Data Privacy Matrix, our global project for alignment of data privacy laws by focusing on Asia Pacific data privacy laws and their relationships with the European Union and the USA. This will also suggest potential solutions to address some of the issues which may occur when a breach of data privacy occurs, in order to ensure an individual has their data privacy protected across the boundaries in the Web. With the increase in data processing and storage across different jurisdictions and regions (e.g. public cloud computing), the Waikato Data Privacy Matrix empowers businesses using or providing cloud services to understand the different data privacy requirements across the globe, paving the way for increased cloud adoption and usage.

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  • Privacy preserving computation by fragmenting individual bits and distributing gates

    Will, Mark A.; Ko, Ryan K.L.; Witten, Ian H. (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Solutions that allow the computation of arbitrary operations over data securely in the cloud are currently impractical. The holy grail of cryptography, fully homomorphic encryption, still requires minutes to compute a single operation. In order to provide a practical solution, this paper proposes taking a different approach to the problem of securely processing data. FRagmenting Individual Bits (FRIBs), a scheme which preserves user privacy by distributing bit fragments across many locations, is presented. Privacy is maintained by each server only receiving a small portion of the actual data, and solving for the rest results in a vast number of possibilities. Functions are defined with NAND logic gates, and are computed quickly as the performance overhead is shifted from computation to network latency. This paper details our proof of concept addition algorithm which took 346ms to add two 32-bit values-paving the way towards further improvements to get computations completed under 100ms.

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  • A Psychotherapist's Experience of Grief: An Heuristic Enquiry

    Alleyne, Bronwyn

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This research explored my subjective experience of being a bereaved psychotherapist, both personally and professionally, in a hospice and a private practice setting. The focus was to find the meaning within my grief experience by investigating, analysing, and reflecting on my experience via a systematic, internal, creative, intuitive, immersive, and deepening explorative process that the heuristic research method and methodology offered. My grief was captured in qualitative and immersive grief depictions, initial questions from which populated my personal search for the answers; and to which I recursively and painfully immersed myself in to explicate the core themes and the essence of the experience.

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  • Assessing How Small Island Communities Prepare for a Tsunami: A Case Study of Phi Phi Island, Thailand

    Poompoe, Arissara

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami revealed that the west coast, and many of its small islands, in the Andaman Sea are vulnerable to tsunamis. Such a devastating event also emphasised the importance of having local communities well prepared to deal with future tsunamis. Since the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, a number of risk mitigation measures have been developed in the tsunami prone-areas. However, about 11 years after the event, little is known about the levels of preparedness of Thai residents living on islands exposed to tsunamis. This study aims to identify the elements underlying preparedness of the local people residing in Thai small islands, and scrutinize the preparedness measures undertaken by the government agencies since the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Phi Phi Island was used as a case study as it is representative of the many small islands located in the Andaman Sea. The present research relied on a questionnaire survey carried out with over 20 permanent residents from Phi Phi Island – about 10 percent of the residents living in the study area. This research also utilised field observation and analysis of relevant documents, including policy documents, reports, and academic publications. Findings show that preparedness behaviours of the local residents was widely affected by their personal perception, belief, and bias of prior experience to tsunamis. The available resources within the local residents’ daily context (e.g. time, finances) and trust in the authority were crucial factors that considerably affected making decisions in taking preparedness. Many preparedness measures have been addressed in the Island (e.g. Tsunami Early Warning, Tsunami Warning Signage, Land Plan Use Guideline); however, challenges regarding their effectiveness and insufficient maintenance of those measures are evident. The present study recommends that local communities and the elements that shape their perception of tsunamis, should be, to a greater extent, integrated in the preparedness activities carried out by local government agencies. Moreover, strengthrning Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (CBDRM) approach is likely to be useful in order to promote tsunami preparedness.

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  • Musings on Musos: A Thematic Analysis of the Working Conditions Experienced by New Zealand Musicians

    Smith, Ximena

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The labour conditions in creative industries, such as the music industry, are complex. For instance, the deterioration of the 9-to-5 workday and the rise of project-based work has given creative workers more autonomy and pleasure in their work (Florida, 2002, 2005; Howkins, 2001; Leadbeater, 1999). However, other conditions that accompany creative work, such as precarity and insecurity, can result in stressful experiences for creative workers (Banks & Hesmondhalgh, 2009). The purpose of this research, then, is to explore the conditions and subjective experiences of three musicians working in the New Zealand music industry, and to obtain an account of the challenges these workers may face. Developing a deeper understanding of creatives’ experiences in the music industry is useful, because a significant amount of public money is given to New Zealand On Air and the New Zealand Music Commission to support the growth of this industry (New Zealand Music Commission, 2013; Scott & Craig, 2012). However, these government bodies have not published any research regarding the lived experiences of New Zealand music workers, or investigated the personal issues musicians may face when it comes to working successfully in the industry. The research is therefore intended to shed light on the upsides and downfalls of working in the industry, and is guided by the question: What are the experiences of New Zealand musicians regarding the labour conditions in the New Zealand music industry? In order to answer this research question, one-on-one responsive interviews were conducted with three self-identified musicians who work in New Zealand’s music industry (Rubin & Rubin, 2005). Braun and Clarke’s (2006) thematic analysis was then used to analyse and interpret the data set. Five major themes were found to be present in the data. These include the sense among the musicians that the New Zealand music scene is small; the presence of career uncertainty; the importance of authenticity; cultural entrepreneurialism; and the existence of cultural intermediaries in the musicians’ working lives. Overall, it was found that the music industry provides significant opportunities for musicians to have positive working experiences. However, these experiences may not be felt by other musicians in different circumstances, who may not be able to manage the challenges of the industry as easily as those musicians interviewed. This research therefore ends with the recommendation that further measures by the government could be taken, such as the reinvigoration of the PACE (Pathway to Arts and Cultural Employment) scheme (Shuker, 2008), in order to make good work experiences more widely accessible to those working in the music industry.

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  • Understanding the Resilience of Small and Medium-sized Enterprises to Flood Risk in Ayutthaya, Thailand

    Saengnakhon, Boonyarit

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Thailand has experienced several flood events during recent years. The rate of such events is forecast to increase in the future due to the geographic and climatic characteristics of the country. While businesses, in general, are affected by major disruptions from flooding, Small, and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) are particularly vulnerable as they have limited resources with which to prepare, respond, and recover from flooding, in comparison to their larger counterparts. This dissertation aimed to assess the resilience of SMEs for flood risks, and understand the current measures taken by these organizations to adapt, prevent, and limit the adverse impacts of flooding on their business activities. The research focuses on SMEs in Ayutthaya province, Thailand. The data was collected through mixed methods, using a questionnaire-based survey and two semi-structured interviews, followed by qualitative (qualitative description and cognitive map) and quantitative analysis (specific values, highest and lowest values, and trends over time, proportions, and distributions). The results indicated that SMEs were likely to experience a range of impacts from flood events. Of these, the indirect impacts of flooding were relatively higher and encompassed impacts such as product and service disruptions, travel difficulties for customers and staff, and supply chain disruptions. A majority of SMEs opted for flood coping strategies, including at least one measure of flood protection against the impacts of flooding events. The research also identified a number of key elements that affect the coping capacity of SMEs to flood risks, such as the size of business, previous experience of floods, and the perception of senior management or business owners. The main conclusion of this study is that SMEs are likely to have a lack of coping strategies and adopt various methods of addressing flood risks. However, vulnerability, coping strategies, and coping capacity have to be enhanced, in conjunction with the lessons learned from previous flooding experiences, to address the weaknesses of their organizations in effectively minimizing the potential impacts of future flood risk.

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  • Empirical Approaches for Human Behavior Analytics

    Lu, Jia

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Surveillance is ubiquitous in our communities which can be utilized to deal with multiple security issues. However, most of surveillance systems still are not intelligent which are mainly relying on security staff’s human labor. Thus, human behavior analysis based on computer vision could tremendously reduce security staff’s workload. To analyze and understand human behaviors in surveillance, the start point is to extract computable features from captured videos based on detected human body, the ultimate goal is to finally recognize human behaviors from motion and event analysis. This thesis presents comprehensive and in-depth empirical approaches for event recognition in surveillance based on distinct Feature Extraction Techniques (FET), namely: Histograms of Oriented Gradients (HOG), Local Binary Pattern (LBP) and Scale Invariant Local Ternary Pattern (SILTP). Each of the FETs is based on local feature descriptor which depends on adjusting the cell size of the ROI to achieve better performance. In this thesis, we find the cell size will influence not only the computational time, but also the precision rate. This thesis utilizes the well-known Weizmann video datasets. While both LBP and SILTP features work very well, HOG has shown its superior performance for human behaviour analytics with five selected events (Walking, Running, Skipping, Jumping and Jacking). The simulated results of three classifiers from WEKA (MLP, k-NN, decision tree) have reflected rightness of the extracted features. In this thesis, the empirical approaches for human behaviour analytics in surveillance reduce human labor tremendously. The contributions of this thesis are: (1) The distinct FET makes the best precision of overall human behaviour recognition at the rate above 97.7%. (2) By adjusting the cell size of ROI, the proposed approaches are able to be accelerated, furthermore, computational time could be reduced.

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  • Juxtapose: An Exploration of the Technical and Aesthetic Potential of Print-based Augmented Reality Design

    Menorath, Darren

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This practice-led research project examines how the technological and aesthetic components of augmented reality (AR) serve to extend, enhance and disrupt print-based design. The outcome of the project is a conceptual hybrid AR/print publication that demonstrates the aesthetics and models of AR creation in an augmented space; a book that represents the merging of virtual and physical, in terms of technology and aesthetics. Juxtapose explores tensions between the digital and the analogue and invites the reader to physically and virtually interact with the artefact. Handmade and digital elements are juxtaposed to enhance, extend and reveal layers of information and representation. The artefact is a site of experimentation that explores the possibilities of interaction resulting from the use of multiple markers to create a playful augmented space. This project also investigates the concept of an augmented space; a mixed reality (MR) world (a hybrid reality that combines physical and digital objects in a real-time interactive space). Juxtapose engages with Matsuda’s contemporary vision of an augmented space (2016), a term proposed by Manovich (2002) that draws on Baudrillard’s concept of hyperreality based on simulacra and simulation (1981). Matsuda proposes that Manovich’s augmented space is also a setting where individuals are free to create, customise and contribute to both shared and personal augmented space. The final artefact uses a collection of zines (handmade magazines) that explores the hyper- consumerist aesthetic of the Vaporwave design movement as a form of visual critique, whilst proposing a networked model of content creation in augmented space. Taking into consideration current handmade movements such as Zine culture, this project also considers the potential of AR as a participatory creative space.

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  • Exploring How Hospitality Undergraduate Students’ Perceptions and Attitudes Towards a Career in the Hospitality Industry Are Affected by Their Work Experience: A New Zealand Quantitative Study

    Chan, Muk Chung

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This research explores the demographics and career aspirations of hospitality undergraduate students who are studying for a hospitality degree in New Zealand. Furthermore, it explores hospitality undergraduate students’ attitudes towards a career in the hospitality industry. The attitudes mainly relate to students’ understanding of their career in the hospitality industry. Previous research has revealed the concerning issue that 44% of students will not work in the hospitality industry after graduation (Richardson, 2008). In order to have a better understanding of the problem, this study has focused on exploring how work experiences have influenced hospitality undergraduate students’ attitudes towards a career in the hospitality industry. The research used a quantitative method, and a questionnaire was used to collect the quantitative data from a major hospitality education provider. The findings indicate that first year students have the highest intention to work in the hospitality industry after graduation (83%) whereas third year students have the least intention to work in the hospitality industry after graduation (66%). The findings show that students’ work experiences have a great influence on their attitudes towards working in the hospitality industry. As students progress their studies and gain more work experience, they appear to form negative attitudes about their future in the sector. This dissertation concludes by providing recommendations to hospitality industry practitioners and hospitality education providers that may reverse this trend.

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  • Modes and Progression of Tool Deterioration and Their Effects on Cutting Force During End Milling of 718Plus Ni-based Superalloy Using Cemented WC-CO Tools

    Razak, Nurul Hidayah

    Doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Understanding the detailed progression of cutting tool deterioration and how deterioration affects cutting force (F) during milling of difficult-to-cut Ni-based superalloys is important for the improvement of machinability of the alloys. It also serves to clarify whether and how an F-based method for monitoring tool deterioration is possible. This understanding is however far from sufficient, as is explained in this thesis after a comprehensive review of the literature. The aim of the present research is thus to determine and explain the modes and progression of tool deterioration and how cutting forces may vary due to the various deterioration features of the cutting tool edge. Experimentally, the study started by using a typical milling condition with both uncoated and coated cemented carbide (WC-Co) tools. Milling was conducted in either dry or wet conditions. After each pass of a selected distance, the tool was examined in detail in the same manner. Thus, tool deterioration could be monitored more closely and failure mechanisms could be identified and explained. Following on the study on determining the modes of tool deterioration, the progress of deterioration and cutting forces during milling were carefully monitored. Through analysing the monitored tool deterioration features and measured force data, how edge wear, chipping and breakage in cutting edge and beyond the edge contribute to the variation of cutting forces could be studied and better understood. Furthermore, experiments have also been conducted using workpiece in a hardened state. It has been observed that the commonly recognised build-up layer in the initial stage does not significantly affect the tool deterioration process. Instead, from the beginning of milling, cutting forces/stresses could cause small chipping locally in the initially sharp cutting edge. Fracturing locally with cracks propagating outside the cutting edge along the flank face in the subsurface region could also take place and was consistent with the direction of the cutting force. There was an initial period of time during which a number of microcracks had initiated in and near the cutting edge on the rake face side. These cracks soon propagated resulting in extensively fracturing and blunting of the tool. Coating of the tools had provided little protection as in the cutting edge area the coating had broken away soon after milling started. The major tool failure mode was Co binder material having heavily deformed to fracture, separating the WC grains. Loss of strength in binder material at cutting temperatures is also discussed. As would be expected, the general trend of how F increased as the number of pass (Npass) increased agreed with the general trend of increasing flank wear (VB) as Npass increased. However, the F-VBmax plot has shown a rather poor F-VBmax relationship. This was the result of the different modes of tool deterioration affecting VBmax differently, but VBmax did not represent fully the true cutting edge of the deteriorating tool insert. Chipping and breakage of the inserts confined in the cutting area, resulting in the significant blunting of the edge area, causing a high rate of F increase as VBmax increased and completely deteriorated 6 minutes within of milling time. Fracturing along the face of thin pieces effectively increased VBmax without increasing the cutting edge area and without further blunting the edge, thus no increase in F was required. The high rate, meaning high ∆F/∆VBmax, results from the effect of the edge deterioration/blunting on the reducing the effective rake angle and thus increasing F is suggested and discussed. The use of coolant has not been found to affect tool deterioration/life and cutting force. Explanation for this will be given considering the deformation zone for which coolant does not have an effect. An increase in feed rate has reduced the tool life and the mode of deterioration has become more edge chipping/fracturing dominant, leading to a better F-VBmax relationship. Finally, it has been observed that the rate of tool deterioration is not higher when the hardened workpiece material is used. The modes and progression of deterioration of tools using hardened workpiece were determined to be comparable to those when annealed workpiece was used. Furthermore, the trends of increase in cutting force as milling pass increases have been observed to be similar for both workpiece material conditions. Interrupt milling experiments followed by hardness mapping has indicted that the workpiece hardened state has not affected the deformation area significantly, although increase in hardness in a similar amount in the severe deformed region has been found for both cases. It is suggested that temperature increases in the narrow deformation zone to be similar for both workpiece conditions and at high temperatures hardening mechanisms do not operate, and thus cutting force values do not differ significantly. Furthermore, the modes and rate of tool deterioration on the hardened workpiece was comparable to the annealed workpiece.

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  • New Lynn – Auckland IMM case study : low-density urban morphology and energy performance optimisation. A new pilot project in Auckland using Integrated Modification Methodology (IMM)

    Tadi, Massimo; Bogunovich, Dushko (2017-04-04)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Integrated Modification Methodology (IMM) has already been applied in established metropolitan contexts, such as Porto Maravilha in Rio de Janeiro, the neighbourhood of Shahrak-e Golestan in Tehran, and Block 39 in New Belgrade. When Unitec Institute of Technology’s Associate Professor of Urban Design Dushko Bogunovich came up with the idea of a comparative analysis of two sprawling metropolitan contexts – Auckland and Milan – he and Massimo Tadi, Director of the IMMdesignlab in Milan and Associate Professor at the School of Architectural Engineering at the Politecnico di Milano, decided to apply IMM to a sample area of low-density suburban Auckland. The project presented in this book was developed in a joint international design workshop organised by Politecnico di Milano, IMMdesignlab and Unitec Institute of Technology. The workshop was held at Politecnico di Milano, Polo Territoriale di Lecco (Italy), from 25–29 May 2015, and the team, comprising 14 international students from different design disciplines, was coordinated by Tadi and Bogunovich, assisted by engineers Hadi Mohammad Zadeh and Frederico Zaniol (IMMdesignlab). The outcomes of the workshop were then further developed by IMMdesignlab to demonstrate how, by adopting IMM, it is possible to retrofit, renovate and reactivate an inefficient and energy consuming neighbourhood into a more integrated and sustainable one.

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  • Earthquakes and the rebuild of Christchurch: how Geography provides the answers

    Kingham, S. (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Teachers’ experiences of including children and families from Asian cultural backgrounds in early childhood education.

    Youn, Jung Yoon (2016)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis investigates New Zealand early childhood teachers’ understanding and experiences of teaching and including children from Asian backgrounds, in particular, Korean, Chinese and Japanese cultures. In Aotearoa New Zealand, participation in early childhood education of diverse ethnic groups is growing every year. Since 2004, the largest growth in enrolments has been among Asian ethnic groups, with an increase of 90%. The New Zealand Early Childhood Curriculum, Te Whāriki, states “there are many migrants in New Zealand, and, as in any country with a multicultural heritage, there is a diversity of beliefs about childrearing practices, kinship roles, obligations, codes of behaviour, and what kinds of knowledge are valuable” (Ministry of Education, 1996, p. 18). It is therefore important that teachers in the early childhood education service sector are able to effectively respond to the holistic learning needs and well-being of children and families from different ethnicities. This research explores what culturally inclusive and responsive teaching means in the New Zealand early childhood setting and looks at some of the barriers to and facilitators of creating learning environments that meet the needs of children from Asian cultural backgrounds. Data was collected through interviews and questionnaires from teachers working in different early childhood centres in Christchurch. The information gathered was reviewed and evaluated using thematic analysis and the findings were considered in the context of a number of themes – from the teachers’ perceptions of Asian parents and families as influenced by their own experience, to their ideas about progressing inclusive education for children and families from Asian cultural backgrounds. This work highlights some strategies that may help progress cultural inclusion. It also outlines current research and identifies the need for more exemplars for teachers and for further research in this area.

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  • Geography and health

    Kingham, S. (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Invited Keynote: Laboratory Christchurch : Redefining stormwater system resilience in a multihazard environment

    Hart, D.E. (2016)

    Conference item
    University of Canterbury Library

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