82,469 results

  • The European Union's rights-based approach: helping Pacific communities to overcome gender-based violence?

    Brown, Eva (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Gender equality is a fundamental human right and consequently the foundation to achieving sustainable development. As human beings, women and girls, men and boys, are all entitled to living a life of dignity, free of want or fear. Unfortunately, many societies around the world continue to be organised in ways that discriminate individuals on the basis of their gender. Gender-­‐based violence is a perverse manifestation of gender inequality that directly affects many women and girls in societies around the world and is a detrimental factor to achieving sustainable development. The European Union (EU) is a leading advocate for human rights and gender equality on the global stage. In an effort to strengthen and integrate human rights into development, the EU followed other development actors in underlining its commitment to applying a rights-­‐based approach (RBA) to all development cooperation. Meaning that human rights are both incorporated as a means and as a goal of development policies and projects. As a donor in the Pacific, the EU has identified gender equality and the particular issue of gender-­‐based violence as focal areas. This study focuses on the impact of the EU’s RBA on the capacity of civil society to promote gender equality and counter gender-­‐based violence in Melanesian societies. Dominant patriarchal societies tend to tolerate gender-­‐based violence, creating a challenging environment to promote gender equality and women empowerment. Furthermore in these particular societies, human rights and culture are perceived as conflicting concepts. Local civil society is therefore a vital partner for the EU in order to reach local communities and influence policy outcomes. This study undertakes a type of impact assessment in order to identify how an EU RBA is filtering down to the community-­‐level in Melanesia. Semi-­‐structured interviews with leaders of local civil society and policy-­‐makers in Suva, Fiji provided the study with an insight into what the EU is actually doing on the ground. A desk-­‐based analysis of EU policy documents including regional and national indicative programmes for Melanesia were mapped and cross-­referenced with interview data to identify potential gaps between policy rhetoric and action at a community and civil society levels. As an enabler of development, the EU and their newfound approach, have the potential to strengthen civil society capacity to overcome barriers in advocacy for women’s rights. However despite positive intentions in policy, impact on the ground is very much determined by community engagement and is potentially personality-­‐driven. This study investigates the role of the EU both in rhetoric and action in an effort to draw attention to the possible gaps between theory and practise in EU development in the Pacific.

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  • The NEEDNT Foods Moderation Guidelines: Pre-testing of preliminary Moderation Guidelines for the NEEDNT Food List

    Graham, Renee Michelle Cullen (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Background: Obesity is a key modifiable risk factor for non-communicable diseases. The modern food environment provides easy access to inexpensive, highly palatable, energy-dense and nutrient-poor foods and beverages, which are associated with increased BMI and reduced dietary quality. The NEEDNT Food List™, comprising ‘non-essential, energy-dense, nutritionally-deficient’ foods and beverages, was developed to help patients and consumers to clearly distinguish non-essential foods from core foods required for good health. In the present study, the original NEEDNT Food List™ was incorporated into preliminary ‘Moderation Guidelines’, which aim to provide quantified guidance for implementing the concept of dietary moderation, in the context of NEEDNT food and beverage intake. Objectives: The aims of the present study were to create a points and quota system for quantifying and monitoring energy intake from NEEDNT foods and beverages; to pre-test preliminary Moderation Guidelines among a representative group of potential users; and to make recommendations to further develop the Moderation Guidelines as a weight loss tool. Design: This study utilised an observational design and qualitative methods to obtain information-rich verbal data from study participants. Twelve people, aged 22 to 57 years, with a BMI ≥30 and a history of repeated weight loss attempts, were selected to pre-test the Moderation Guidelines over a 4-week period, and subsequently participated in one-on-one, semi-structured interviews. Interviews comprised eight open-ended questions, to explore participants’ views and experiences of the Moderation Guidelines, along with information relating to historical weight loss attempts and thoughts on dietary moderation. Interview data were recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded using NVivo software. Coded data were categorised and evaluated by thematic analysis using a general inductive approach. Results: Preliminary NEEDNT Foods Moderation Guidelines were presented in an A5 booklet format, with NEEDNT foods and beverages assigned 1 NEF (‘non-essential food’ value) per 100 kcal portion. Participants were allocated up to 19 NEFs weekly, representing around 1900 kcal. Participants varied in the extent of their previous dieting experiences. All expressed uncertainty around applying personal concepts of dietary moderation. Nine participants found the Moderation Guidelines usable and beneficial. Five participants self-reported weight losses of 2-4 kg during the 4-week period. Three participants found the Moderation Guidelines less appealing, unusable, or incomplete. All participants reported an improved understanding of dietary moderation generally. Seven participants intended to continue using the Moderation Guidelines. Suggested changes to the print booklet included revision of NEEDNT food and beverage categories, modification of terminology, integration of colour and graphics, clarification of serving sizes, and culture-specific versions. Most participants emphasised the need for support from a Dietitian or other health professional, for dietary guidance around core food groups, and behavioural change techniques. Participants said a NEEDNT-based smartphone app would increase functionality and appeal. Māori and Pacific participants requested culturally tailored NEEDNT-based education. Conclusion: Preliminary NEEDNT Foods Moderation Guidelines show potential for assisting obese persons to lose weight by moderating consumption of NEEDNT foods and beverages. Revision and retesting would further develop the Moderation Guidelines, and should incorporate participants’ recommendations, design principles, behavioural change theories, and best practices in nutrition education. An intervention trial is warranted, to evaluate the effectiveness of revised Moderation Guidelines as a dietary quality and weight loss tool. Further research opportunities include the development of a Moderation Guidelines smartphone app and website, tailored adaptation of the Moderation Guidelines for Māori and Pacific individuals and community groups, and a NEEDNT-based public health campaign.

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  • Surveying in South Africa: Coordinate vs monument cadastre

    Goodwin, David (2017-06)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    The article is an extract from correspondence between an Otago Surveying lecturer and a graduate who worked in Christchurch, New Zealand, and then moved to South Africa. Underlying the dialogue is a critical comparison of cadastral data formats, boundary evidence, and monument based versus legal coordinate cadastres.

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  • Planning for the Protection of Industrial Land and Services in the Sustainable City - A Nelson, New Zealand Case Study

    Keyse, Matt (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Industrial zoned land and industrial activities within cities are facing a number of challenges which could potentially see industry displaced from urban environments. Contributing to this is the inadequate coverage of industry in growth management strategies such as Smart Growth and the Compact City, which influence urban development and local planning legislation. The aim of this thesis was to confirm the increasing evidence that industrial activities remain vitally important to a city’s sustainable development and for ensuring the positive function of local economies. This was explored within the case study of Nelson, New Zealand, a region experiencing high levels of population and economic growth within a strictly limited land base. Industrial land is under increasing pressure with future supply expected to be exhausted within six years at the current rate of demand. Results of this research have confirmed the importance of industry within urban spaces and the need for tighter planning for the protection of industrial land and services if the city’s sustainable goals are to be achieved. Intensification was explored as a means by which industry can fit within smart growth strategies and can be reconceptualised to fit within the modern city. In addition, an industrial land supply method was developed as a practical starting point for local authorities to quantify future industrial land supply and also understand the complexity of issues relating to industrial sites and activities. Research enabled recommendations to be made which will assist planning and policy initiatives to ensure sustainable and more efficient industrial zone management.

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  • Conquest, Kingship, Calamity: Demetrius Poliorcetes After Ipsus

    Dunn, Charlotte Marie Rose (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Demetrius Poliorcetes (336-282 BC), was one of the extraordinary figures of the Hellenistic Age, whose career began in wake of the chaos that followed the death of Alexander the Great. His father was Antigonus Monophthalmus, one of the greatest of the Successors, and under Antigonus’ guidance Demetrius achieved some of the standout accomplishments of his career. The pair’s ceaseless and energetic campaigning enabled them to jointly claim the royal title in 306 BC, something which quickly prompted the other Successors to follow suit. They continued to consolidate and expand their empire in the years that followed; however, the Antigonids’ dominant position eventually saw the other dynasts conspire to eliminate them. In 301 BC, Demetrius suffered a violent reversal of fortune, when the coalition that had formed against the Antigonids defeated them in battle, and his father was killed. This misfortune saw Demetrius fleeing from the battlefield with a small band of followers, now the heir to a piecemeal and much threatened empire.

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  • Why place Māori children with Māori caregivers? : a dissertation presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Social Work (Applied) Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Montgomery, Mary Avril (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This qualitative study explores the concepts of customary care, recognising the Maori worldview and emphasising the value of placing Maori children with Maori caregivers. It examines the establislunent of the Matua Whangai Programme in the context of the social/political issues of the 1980-1990s and the impact of legislation and reports on the placement of Maori children outside of whanau. The participants in this study were three caregivers m the Matua Whangai Programme. They each had experience of customary care practice in their own whanau and who generalised this experience in the context of the Matua Whangai programme. In this community, the Matua Whangai programme ran from 1985 to 1991. The study shows that when the programme was disestablished, not only did Maori children lose access to whanau whangai (foster families), the community also lost tribal linkages, both locally and nationally, along with effective networks with other social and governmental agencies established by Matua Whangai within the Lower South Island

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  • The cat effect : investigating the relationship between cat ownership and health : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirement for the degree of Master of Science in Psychology at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

    Taylor, Gweneth (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Companion animals are an important part of the New Zealand psychosocial environment and companion cats are particularly popular. A number of studies have explored the relationship between pet ownership and physical and psychological health but the results have been inconclusive. Despite a lack of conclusive evidence people continue to believe that the presence of pets can enhance health and wellbeing. Specifically, there is increasing interest in the benefits to be gained from animal assisted activities and therapies. Research based on the connection between animals and health has mainly focused on physical and psychological outcomes. The present qualitative research differs from the previous work in that the focus is on investigating the nature of the owner-to-cat relationship that underpins claims of enhanced health and wellbeing. A sample (N=10) comprising five males and five females 45-77 years of age were recruited for the study with the main inclusion criteria being that they owned a cat. Open ended interviews were transcribed and the transcripts were subjected to a thematic analysis technique to identify themes that captured common aspects relative to the person-to-cat relationship. Four themes were identified. First, communication enhanced connectedness and tended to be anthropomorphic in nature. Second, companionship was linked with pleasure and often involved a close bond. Third, inclusiveness enhanced a sense of belonging when cats were often presented as one of the family. Fourth, interdependence was linked to responsibility and a sense of purpose. The overarching theme, however, was the affirmation of identity for the owner that featured throughout the transcripts. Identity formation, maintenance and protection were found to be fundamental to the nature of the person-to-cat relationship. Identity affirmation was linked to a need to feel good, a need to belong, a need to feel competent, a need to have meaning in life and self esteem, all of which can enhance psychological health and a sense of wellbeing. These findings related to a small group of devoted cat owners so the findings may not apply to other types of ownership. Broader implications related to pet assisted activities are called into question when just having a cat around or a brief encounter may not be enough to have a positive effect on health. For this reason, if a relationship with a cat is to have a positive effect, you may have to really love your cat.

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  • Planning to develop land returned under Treaty settlement in Waikato, Aotearoa New Zealand : an institutional ethnography : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Health at Massey University, SHORE & Whāriki Research Centre, Aotearoa New Zealand

    Livesey, Brigid Te Ao McCallum (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    Massey University

    This research investigates planning to develop land returned as settlement for breaches of Te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Treaty of Waitangi). Using institutional ethnography methodology, I explore a case study of the relationship between an iwi authority, Te Whakakitenga o Waikato, and a local authority, Hamilton City Council. In 1995, significant areas of land were returned to Waikato-Tainui through Treaty settlement. This research focuses on processes to develop planning regulation for land owned by Waikato-Tainui at Te Rapa, site of ‘The Base’ retail development and Te Awa shopping mall, and Ruakura where an inland port and associated activities are proposed. Iwi planning documents describe a vision to develop land returned under Treaty settlement. Commercial property development to regain ‘economic sovereignty’ is a critical element in the ‘integrated development agenda’ for Waikato-Tainui. However, critical discourse analysis and intertextual analysis illustrate that this vision is not well-reflected in local government planning documents. Relations between Hamilton City Council and Waikato-Tainui have changed from generally adversarial in 2009 during planning processes to restrict development at Te Rapa through Variation 21, to more collaborative during planning processes to approve the Ruakura Plan Change in 2014. Complementing data from interviewing practitioners with analysis of texts created through these planning processes, I consider control, timing, and trust as key factors in this changing relationship. This research provides evidence for dual planning traditions in Aotearoa New Zealand. Communal ownership of land and inalienability are characteristics of land returned under Treaty settlement which have influenced development decisions made by Waikato-Tainui. Planners and the planning profession can ‘transform’ planning practices to create new relationships between local government and iwi authorities. Interviews suggest that crosscultural planning can be a challenging and emotional experience. Iwi planning documents articulate a vision for future relationships based on mana whakahaere (affirming Māori authority) and mātauranga Māori (valuing Māori knowledge). In response, I highlight the need for changes to the New Zealand Planning Institute Code of Ethics to support planners working to decolonise planning. I conclude by ‘mapping’ the institution of planning for Treaty settlement land, and identifying levers which planners can use to support Māori goals for land development and economic self-determination.

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  • Molecular epidemiology of waterborne zoonoses in the North Island of New Zealand : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Veterinary Science (Epidemiology and Public Health) at Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences (IVABS), Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Shrestha, Rima Devi (2016)

    Doctoral thesis
    Massey University

    Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium and Giardia species are three important waterborne zoonotic pathogens of global public health concern. This PhD opens with an interpretive overview of the literature on Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium and Giardia spp. in ruminants and their presence in surface water (Chapter 1), followed by five epidemiological studies of Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium and Giardia spp. in cattle, sheep and aquatic environment in New Zealand (Chapters 2-6). The second chapter investigated four years of retrospective data on Campylobacter spp. (n=507) to infer the source, population structure and zoonotic potential of Campylobacter jejuni from six high-use recreational rivers in the Wanganui- Manawatu region of New Zealand through the generalised additive model, generalised linear/logistic regression model, and minimum spanning trees. This study highlights the ubiquitous presence of Campylobacter spp. in both low and high river flows, and during winter months. It also shows the presence of C. jejuni in 21% of samples containing highly diverse strains, the majority of which were associated with wild birds only. These wild birds-associated C. jejuni have not been detected in human, suggesting they may not be infectious to human. However, the presence of some poultry and ruminant-associated strains that are potentially zoonotic suggested the possibility of waterborne transmission of C. jejuni to the public. Good biosecurity measures and water treatment plants may be helpful in reducing the risk of waterborne Campylobacter transmission In the third study, a repeated cross-sectional study was conducted every month for four months to investigate the source of drinking source-water contamination. A total of 499 ruminant faecal samples and 24 river/stream water samples were collected from two rural town water catchments (Dannevirke and Shannon) in the Manawatu- Wanganui region of New Zealand, and molecular analysis of those samples was performed to determine the occurrence of Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium, and Giardia spp. and their zoonotic potential. The major pathogens found in faecal samples were Campylobacter (n=225 from 7/8 farms), followed by Giardia (n=151 from 8/8 farms), whereas Giardia cysts were found in many water samples (n=18), followed by Campylobacter (n=4). On the contrary, Cryptosporidium oocysts were only detected in a few faecal (n=18) and water (n=3) samples. Cryptosporidium and Giardia spp. were detected in a higher number of faecal samples from young animals (≤ 3 months) than juvenile and adult animals, whereas Campylobacter spp. were highly isolated in the faecal samples from juvenile and adult ruminants. PCRsequencing of the detected pathogens indicated the presence of potentially zoonotic C. jejuni and C. coli, Cryptosporidium parvum (gp60 allelic types IIA18G3R1 and IIA19G4R1) and Giardia duodenalis (assemblages AII, BII, BIII, and BIV) in cattle and sheep. In addition, potentially zoonotic C. jejuni and Giardia duodenalis assemblages AII, BI, BII, and BIV were also determined in water samples. These findings indicate that these three pathogens of public health significance are present in ruminant faecal samples of farms and in water, and may represent a possible source of human infection in New Zealand. In the fourth study, PCR-sequencing of Cryptosporidium spp. isolates obtained from the faeces of 6-week- old dairy calves (n=15) in the third study were investigated at multiple loci (18S SSU rDNA, HSP70, Actin and gp60) to determine the presence of mixed Cryptosporidium spp. infections. Cryptosporidium parvum (15/15), C. bovis (3/15) and C. andersoni (1/15), and two new genetic variants were determined along with molecular evidence of mixed infections in five specimens. Three main Cryptosporidium species of cattle, C. parvum, C. bovis and C. andersoni, were detected together in one specimen. Genetic evidence of the presence of C. Anderson and two new Cryptosporidium genetic variants are provided here for the first time in New Zealand. These findings provided additional evidence that describes Cryptosporidium parasites as genetically heterogeneous populations and highlighted the need for iterative genotyping at multiple loci to explore the genetic makeup of the isolates. The C. jejuni and C. coli isolates (n=96) obtained from cattle, sheep and water in the third study were subtyped to determine their genetic diversity and zoonotic potential using a modified, novel multi-locus sequence typing method (“massMLST”; Chapter 5). Primers were developed and optimised, PCR-based target-MLST alleles’ amplification were performed, followed by next generation sequencing on an Illumina MiSeq machine. A bioinformatics pipeline of the sequencing data was developed to define C. jejuni and C. coli multi-locus sequence types. This study demonstrated the utility and potential of this novel typing method, massMLST, as a strain typing method. In addition to identifying the possible C. jejuni/coli clonal complexes or sequence types of 68/96 isolates from ruminant faeces and water samples, this study reported three new C. jejuni strains in cattle in New Zealand, along with many strains, such as CC-61, CC-828 and CC-21, that have also been found in humans, indicating the public health significance of these isolates circulating on the farms in the two water catchment areas. Automation of the massMLST method and may allow a cost-effective high-resolution typing method in the near future for multilocus sequence typing of large collections of Campylobacter strains. In the final study (Chapter 6), a pilot metagenomic study was carried out to obtain a snapshot of the microbial ecology of surface water used in the two rural towns of New Zealand for drinking purposes, and to identify the zoonotic pathogens related to waterborne diseases. Fresh samples collected in 2011 and 2012, samples from the same time that were frozen, and samples that were kept in the preservative RNAlater were sequenced using whole-genome shotgun sequencing on an Illumina MiSeq machine. Proteobacteria was detected in all the samples characterised, although there were differences in the genus and species between the samples. The microbial diversity reported varied between the grab and stomacher methods, between samples collected in the year 2011 and 2012, and among the fresh, frozen and RNAlater preserved samples. This study also determined the presence of DNA of potentially zoonotic pathogens such as Cryptosporidium, Campylobacter and Mycobacterium spp. in water. Use of metagenomics could potentially be used to monitor the ecology of drinking water sources so that effective water treatment plans can be formulated, and for reducing the risk of waterborne zoonosis. As a whole, this PhD project provides new data on G. duodenalis assemblages in cattle, sheep and surface water, new information on mixed Cryptosporidium infections in calves, a novel “massMLST” method to subtype Campylobacter species, and shows the utility of shotgun metagenomic sequencing for drinking water monitoring. Results indicate that ruminants (cattle and sheep) in New Zealand shed potentially zoonotic pathogens in the environment and may contribute to the contamination of surface water. A better understanding of waterborne zoonotic transmission would help in devising appropriate control strategies, which could reduce the shedding of Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium, and Giardia spp. in the environment and thereby reduce waterborne transmission.

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  • Teachers' perceptions of psychological services in educational settings in Aotearoa New Zealand : a thesis presented to the Institute of Education at Massey University, Manawatū, New Zealand, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Masters in Educational Psychology

    Williams, Olivia J (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Despite an increasing international knowledge base, there is a lack of New Zealand based research regarding teacher and school perceptions of educational psychology. This study discusses the findings of a survey of teachers’ perceptions of educational psychology services in New Zealand. A total of 164 teachers completed the survey that yielded both quantitative and qualitative data. Findings indicate that there is considerable alignment between educational psychologists and teachers in New Zealand regarding the role of educational psychology. Teachers from this survey reported little contact with educational psychologists, and rated educational psychology services as at least ‘slightly helpful’. Consultation and collaboration with both school staff and parents was recognised as the most important service educational psychologists in New Zealand should provide. The greatest barriers to educational psychology services were identified as insufficient funds, a personal lack of knowledge regarding services and referral processes, and a shortage of educational psychologists. Teachers reported feeling overwhelmed, unsupported and underequipped to properly support the wide ranging and seemingly ever increasing needs of our learners. Overall, the teachers surveyed expressed that too many students are missing out on desperately needed support. These findings suggest important implications for the future of educational psychology services in New Zealand. An increased promotion of psychological, social, and emotional health in schools is proposed as one potential area in which the role of educational psychologists in New Zealand could be further advanced.

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  • An exploratory study of mechanisms to transfer and embed a value-based culture : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree Masters of Business Studies in Management at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

    Wallace, Andrew Mark (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This exploratory study seeks to build on the work of theorists who have proposed concepts to enhance organisational culture through a better alignment of values. The study seeks to gain additional support for the exploration of mechanisms to embed value-based cultures. This is achieved by better understanding the origins of goal-orientated values and the types of culture that manifest in small to medium enterprises. As a result of this study a model was developed, which could be implemented in future longitudinal research on the influence of embedding a value-based culture through the use of applied mechanisms. What distinguishes this study from others is the development of a comprehensive model to define, embed, and measure a value-based culture. To gain a deeper understanding of the concepts a multi-method qualitatively driven methodology was implemented to identify core mechanisms to embed value-based cultures. Additional quantitative data was used to enable a deeper, more robust, understanding of the influence the identified mechanisms have on goal-orientated values and the types of culture, which manifest in a small to medium enterprise. The study suggests that founders of small to medium enterprises can define a value-based culture and through the use of six mechanisms, embed a value-based culture that aligns with the organisation’s objectives. Gaining a better understanding of the concepts and mechanisms to embed a value-based culture enabled the development of a pragmatic process and model, which encompasses each of the key mechanisms identified in the literature. The study adds support to the work of theorists who have argued for value-based cultures and the concept of conflicting core values occurring in organisational cultures. The study builds on the work of others by proposing an applied model that draws the key concepts together into a single comprehensive model.

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  • Considerations on the effect of solutal on the grain size of castings from superheated melts

    Bolzoni, Leandro; Babu, Nadendla Hari (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The amount of solutal present in an alloy affects the grain size of the cast metal as solute is rejected at the solidification front. This is normally quantified using the so called growth restriction factor Q. This work presents some considerations about the effect of solutal on the final cast structure with a focus on the nature of the alloy system, the effect of non-equilibrium solidification conditions and the effect of superheating of the molten metal.

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  • The Effect of Nitrate Supplementation on Cycling Performance in the Heat in Well-Trained Cyclists

    McQuillan, Joseph A.; Casadio, Julia R.; Dulson, Deborah K.; Laursen, Paul B.; Kilding, Andrew E. (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of NO₃⁻ consumption on measures of perception, thermoregulation and cycling performance in hot conditions. Methods: Using a randomised, double-blind, crossover-design, 8 well-trained cyclists (mean ± SD: age: 25 ± 8 y, V̇O2peak: 64 ± 5 ml·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) performed 2 separate trials, in hot (35°C, 60% relative humidity) environments, having ingested either 140 ml NO3--rich beetroot juice ~8 mmol NO₃⁻ (NIT), or placebo (PLA), daily for 3-days with a 7-day washout period separating trials. Trials consisted of 2 × 10 min bouts at 40 and 60% peak power output (PPO) to determine physiological and perceptual responses in the heat, followed by a 4 km cycling time-trial. Results: Basal [nitrite] was substantially elevated in NIT (2.70 ± 0.98 μM) vs PLA (1.10 ± 0.61 μM) resulting in a most likely (ES = 1.58 ± 0.93) increase after 3-days. There was a very likely trivial increase in rectal temperature [Tᵣₑ] in NIT at 40% (PLA;37.4 ± 0.2°C vs NIT;37.5 ± 0.3°C, 0.1 ± 0.2°C) and 60% (PLA;37.8 ± 0.2°C vs NIT;37.9 ± 0.3°C, 0.1 ± 0.2°C) PPO. Cycling performance was similar between trials (PLA;336 ± 45 W vs NIT;337 ± 50 W, CV±95%CL; 0.2 ± 2.5%). Outcomes for heart rate, and perceptual measures were unclear across the majority of time-points. Conclusions: Three days of NO₃⁻ supplementation, resulted in small increases in Tᵣₑ during low- to moderate-intensity exercise, however this did not appear to influence 4 km cycling time-trial performance in hot climates.

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  • Enabling collaborative review with the DSpace configurable workflow

    Schweer, Andrea; Barr, Jenni; Congdon, Deirdre; Symes, Megan (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The DSpace configurable workflow feature enables the creation of custom review workflows beyond the traditional edit metadata, accept, reject actions. This poster reports on our experiences in using the customisable workflow to enable collaborative review by repository management staff for the AgResearch institutional research repository, AgScite.

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  • Urban Rural Differences in Breast Cancer in New Zealand

    Lawrenson, Ross; Lao, Chunhuan; Elwood, Mark; Brown, Charis; Sarfati, Diana; Campbell, Ian (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Many rural communities have poor access to health services due to a combination of distance from specialist services and a relative shortage of general practitioners. Our aims were to compare the characteristics of urban and rural women with breast cancer in New Zealand, to assess breast cancer-specific and all-cause survival using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox proportional hazards model, and to assess whether the impact of rurality is different for Māori and New Zealand (NZ) European women. We found that rural women tended to be older and were more likely to be Māori. Overall there were no differences between urban and rural women with regards their survival. Rural Māori tended to be older, more likely to be diagnosed with metastatic disease and less likely to be screen detected than urban Māori. Rural Māori women had inferior breast cancer-specific survival and all-cause survival at 10 years at 72.1% and 55.8% compared to 77.9% and 64.9% for urban Māori. The study shows that rather than being concerned that more needs to be done for rural women in general it is rural Māori women where we need to make extra efforts to ensure early stage at diagnosis and optimum treatment.

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  • Expanding the conversational terrain: Using a choice experiment to assess community preferences for post-disaster redevelopment options

    Tait, Peter R.; Vallance, Suzanne A.; Rutherford, Paul

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    The Canterbury region of New Zealand was shaken by major earthquakes on the 4th September 2010 and 22nd February 2011. The quakes caused 185 fatalities and extensive land, infrastructure and building damage, particularly in the Eastern suburbs of Christchurch city. Almost 450 ha of residential and public land was designated as a ‘Red Zone’ unsuitable for residential redevelopment because land damage was so significant, engineering solutions were uncertain, and repairs would be protracted. Subsequent demolition of all housing and infrastructure in the area has left a blank canvas of land stretching along the Avon River corridor from the CBD to the sea. Initially the Government’s official – but enormously controversial – position was that this land would be cleared and lie fallow until engineering solutions could be found that enabled residential redevelopment. This paper presents an application of a choice experiment (CE) that identified and assessed Christchurch residents’ preferences for different land use options of this Red Zone. Results demonstrated strong public support for the development of a recreational reserve comprising a unique natural environment with native fauna and flora, healthy wetlands and rivers, and recreational opportunities that align with this vision. By highlighting the value of a range of alternatives, the CE provided a platform for public participation and expanded the conversational terrain upon which redevelopment policy took place. We conclude the method has value for land use decision-making beyond the disaster recovery context.

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  • The Rock

    Blaber, Donna

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The Rock is a draft of a contemporary Upper Middle Grade/Young YA children's novel, which forms the creative component required to complete a Master of Creative Writing. The accompanying exegesis, entitled Contemporary Themes for Modern Tweens, examines the thinking and research that led to its creation. This includes the importance of tackling modern-day issues in contemporary Upper Middle Grade children's literature in New Zealand, the genre and its restrictions, the methodology employed to keep controversial subject matter non-explicit, as well as the importance of the development of children's identity through reading novels set in recognisable landscapes. Overall it questions whether it is possible to introduce controversial material, usually only found in the realms of YA, to a younger audience. It draws the conclusion that it is possible with multiple layering, revision and a lot of research in the field.

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  • Clinical Guidelines: Designing for Accurate Decision-making.

    Thornhill, Byron

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This project explores how the use of clinical guidelines can be improved through a design-led approach. Clinicians in surgical operation settings at Auckland City Hospital, as primary users of clinical guidelines, were placed at the centre of the project design process in order to gain an in-depth and holistic understanding of guideline users. The guideline design was prototyped to ensure key principles of information design are adhered to, setting structure, user accessibility and visual design at the forefront of the information design process. The outcome of the research was a smartphone application for haematology-related guidelines that enables efficient and accurate decision-making in perioperative settings.

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  • Evaluation and Improvement of Current Computational Tools for Metabolomics Data Analysis

    Li, SiMing

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

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  • ‘Homebound’: The Illustrated Graphic Novel As an Autobiographic Voice for an Immigrant Asian Gay Male in New Zealand

    Chooi, Don Yew Li

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This practice-led artistic inquiry takes the form of an 80-page, scripted and illustrated graphic novel. Creatively, the work is concerned with the narratisation of a largely autobiographical voice through the juxtaposition of word, image, and decompression story telling. The narrative draws heavily upon certain experiences I had, growing up in Malaysia and moving to New Zealand. In this journey, I began to identify as an Asian gay man within the bear culture. Specifically, the novel and exegesis unpack the nature of belonging as both a concern of ethnicity and sexual orientation. In doing so, it draws upon recent discourse surrounding non-western considerations of gay masculinity, filial obligations and notions of the ‘chosen family’. The novel will be available on 2018-12-11

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