82,469 results

  • The artist is not present : a strategic investigation of psychological complexity through performance : a thesis submitted to the faculty a Massey University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Fine Arts in the College of Creative Arts in Massey University

    Beatrice, Hannah (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Hannah Beatrice, THE ARTIST IS NOT PRESENT: A strategic investigation of psychological complexity through performance. A solo female figure manipulates hybridized subjectivity and performed authenticity. I have the ability to displace audiences and present an alternative perspective of reality through the form of a live performance. I perform using expected frameworks: enacting social conventions and expectations based on the context of performances, [place, space, audience, time], and the subjectivity of performer; in order to simultaneously present, embody, and experience an exploration of the human psyche relevant to today’s decaying Western society. “And the question we must now ask ourselves is to know whether in this world that is slipping away, committing suicide without realizing it, a nucleus of men can be found to impress [a] higher idea of theatre on the world, to bring to all of us a natural, occult equivalent of the dogma we no longer believe.” - Antonin Artaud II The live performance work is influenced by tactics used in early Absurdist and Surrealist theatre practices, challenging traditional concepts of what live performance might achieve, along with its function: • Questioning the nature of existence and the validity of a decaying society through the deconstruction of both characteristic and anticipated frameworks. • Transgressing the boundary between audience and the performer to address psychological complexities. • A practice orientated towards audience affect, performer and audience relationship, and the audience’s specific role in relation to the body of work. The audience disturbs the work as much as the work disturbs the audience, making the practice audience responsive and it evolves based on its reception. Whether it is genuine or not, I have been interested in manifesting induced ‘liveness’ through dismantling boundaries, whilst still maintaining distance between the audience and myself. The reality of performing through qualities of intimacy, fantasy vs. fact, and performed authenticity, means that the work extends beyond simply the live performance event. I am not restricting myself to being responsive to the audience within the live performance events only, but across the practice through such things as residual documents and imagery. In this way, the emphasis is on a holistic practice, and the artist is then rarely present.

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  • Selective Laser Sintering of PMMA and PMMA Plus β-tricalcium Phosphate Polymer Composites

    Velu, Rajkumar

    Doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Certain material systems are currently playing significant roles in the medical application areas. Classified as bio-polymers, polyethylene (PE), polyamide (PA), Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), poly (lactic acid) (PLA), poly (glycolic acid) (PGA), and poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) are notable examples. While these materials are known for their bio-compatibility characteristics, the bio-conductive nature promoting further growth and repairing the damaged parts is often lacking. Natural coral derived HA/calcium carbonate composites and synthetic calcium phosphates are known for bio-conductivity. As a natural consequence, medical materials used in particular for bone repair and replacement needs are a mixture of a biopolymer composite and a bio ceramic. The resulting bio-polymer composites loaded with bio-ceramics such as hydroxyapatite and calcium phosphate into different bio-polymer matrices combine the properties both phases and serve the purpose of the specific medical application. Several processing methods such as solvent casting or leaching, phase separation, foaming, gas saturation etc., are applied to put these polymer composites to service. However, most methods fail due to several drawbacks such as time and cost involved and more importantly, lack of flexibility to exactly reproduce complex shapes. In particular, achieving a complex shape is often a prerequisite condition in many medical applications. During the past two decades, the layered processing methods rapidly evolved from mere prototyping solutions to the more advanced technologies, commonly referred to as additive manufacturing. Considering the freedom these techniques offer to manufacture complex forms without any specific tooling or the alteration of the materials and processes, it became important to revisit the current processing techniques as applied to different biopolymers used for varying medical needs. The current research is an attempt in this direction, evaluating a selected combination of a bio-material and an additive processing technology. The specific medical application area targeted is in the bone repair and replacement tasks. Poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) is selected as the base polymer considering its wider use in bone related applications. The β-form of the tri-calcium phosphate (β-TCP) is the bio-ceramic component to impart the bio-conductivity to the polymer composite. Selective laser sintering is the process, considering the ease of working with powder raw materials and the ultimate control over the micro and meso structures of the sintered substrates. The material consolidation mechanism involves localized heating by a fast moving laser beam. The first task is to match the material combinations with the laser energy so that the substrates absorbs sufficient energy from the laser to achieve the particle melting, fusion, and consolidation. Considering the absorptivity levels of the constituent powders, a CO2 laser source is selected for the experimental investigations. Simulating the laser sintering process conditions required the development of both hardware and software systems and the integration of the same to achieve the overall experimental test bed. Powder feeding and envelope temperature control systems are added for further process controls. Establishing the viability of the material and process combination involved experimental evaluations in three significant stages. The neat PMMA powders are evaluated first for laser sintering with varying process parameters. Working ranges of laser energy densities for initial laser sintering experiments are established by differential scanning calorimetric results. Morphologies of sintered surfaces and porosity analyses are used to evaluate the intra-layer coalescence. Critical process parameters, laser power and scan velocities are gradually adjusted towards more optimum combinations based on these initial results. Further sintering trials and evaluation of the morphological, physical and mechanical characterization results allowed to establish the best process conditions and the overall effectiveness of neat PMMA for selective laser sintering. The same procedure is repeated in the second stage based on varying compositions of PMMA plus β-TCP composites. The final stage involved evaluation of the possible after-effects if any on the biological and the multi-layer responses of the sintered polymer composites based on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), in-vitro analyses, and mechanical testing. Overall, the experimental results indicate the suitability of both neat PMMA and PMMA plus β-TCP polymeric materials for processing by selective laser sintering. Best combinations of critical process parameters, laser power and scan velocities could be established for both material systems. The laser interactions are proved to cause no detrimental effects either in the polymer chemistry or the biological nature of the materials further to sintering. Sufficient inter-layer coalescence is also evidenced, establishing the effectiveness of the material and process combination for manufacturing 3D forms. Considering the significant attributes of the constituent material systems and the unlimited design freedom allowed by the laser sintering approach, the findings reported in this thesis are expected to pave ways for wider research interest as well as potential medical applications in the future.

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  • Social accountability - Its position and potential in the development of Vietnam

    Ta, Ha (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Civil society organizations in Vietnam are experiencing some critical transitions. As the nation is no longer on the list of low income countries, an increasing number of such organizations are changing their missions from alleviating poverty to promoting more democratic governance. ‘Social accountability’, as one of their most common employed approaches, is often the combination of civic engagement, evidence-based monitoring, and advocacy. Carrying with it the expectation of improving accountability in Vietnam, the approach is still a new, foreign-imported concept which will challenge and be challenged by particular contextual factors in the country. This study examines the practices of social accountability in Vietnam to find out its position and potential in terms of development of the country. Promoting social accountability in Vietnam is often based on the assumption that the approach will improve government’s accountability, strengthening the state – citizen relationship. It is envisaged that the country will be eventually more open as a result. It is as yet an optimistic vision and will take time for practitioners to put in place. This study aims to analyse how early adoption of social accountability is affected by Vietnam’s contextual factors, to what extent it is affecting governance and increasing people’s participation, and what organizations can actually expect of social accountability. The research aims to fill a gap in the literature regarding social accountability in Vietnam. As a new concept, social accountability is often introduced via materials provided by international organizations like World Bank and UNICEF. Most of the documents present successful cases of applying social accountability in other countries like India and Bangladesh, and countries in Latin America. Thus, a critical analysis of adopting social accountability in the Vietnam context is necessary to provide more insights for both practitioners and scholars on the topic. Employing interviews as the key method, the study seeks input from key informants who are involved in the adoption of social accountability in Vietnam. From perspectives of government officials, development practitioners, and community members, the reality of practicing social accountability and how it is interacting and negotiating with other factors in society should be more clearly revealed. Practical expectations and recommendations to conceive of and practice social accountability in Vietnam are also suggested.

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  • Social Aspects of Demographic Stochasticity in an Endangered Population of Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)

    Johnston, David Robert (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Photography is one of the most widely used tools in conservation biology. In the analysis of social species, analyses of photographic identification data are used to infer the degree of association among uniquely marked individuals. The present study aimed to develop and assess the practicality of a new time-based method for defining associations among individuals, comparing results to the commonly used group membership method. The method was applied to archived photographs from long-term monitoring of the population of bottlenose dolphins of Doubtful Sound, New Zealand, to assess differences in seasonal association rates among individuals. The time-based method produced analyses of association at finer scales than the group membership method, and produced greater precision in association indices. Importantly the method can be applied retrospectively to any dataset in which individuals, marine or terrestrial, are uniquely identified via time-stamped photographs. Applied to the long-term dataset, results indicate differences in association rates between summer and winter seasons. During summer months the degree of sociality was generally higher; larger mixed-sex groups and greater rates of association among individuals were observed. Sociality in this population is female orientated; the majority of top-scoring individuals in centrality analyses were female. Explorations of whether a mother’s position in the social network influences the survival of her calves were inconclusive. Who the mother is significantly affects calf survival, but why this is so remains unclear. The most important influence on calf survival is birth timing; those born during the months of February, March and April have much higher chances of survival than calves born outside of this period. This is in agreement with previous studies on this population, though further research is required in order to tease apart the relative importance of driving factors of calf survival in this endangered and isolated population.

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  • Seismic characterisation of hydrate and shallow gas systems associated with active margin sediments and structures in the Pegasus Basin, Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    Fraser, Douglas (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    The Pegasus Basin off the east coast of New Zealand's North Island is a frontier basin that hosts a large gas hydrate province. The basin has a large amount of faulting, which has lead to the creation of many interesting and unique accumulations of gas hydrates. In 2009/2010, petroleum industry standard 2D seismic data were acquired across the basin by New Zealand Petroleum and Minerals (a New Zealand government agency) to generate interest in exploration of this basin for conventional oil and gas. This seismic data set presents an unique opportunity to examine the basin's gas hydrate systems with the aim of determining the economic potential of the gas hydrates in the basin while improving our understanding of how observed gas hydrate features were formed. The seismic data were reprocessed to optimise the imaging of features related to gas hydrates. When the data were examined, there were numerous gas hydrate features found, so only a selection are presented in this thesis. With the assistance of seismic attributes, Bottom Simulating Reflections (BSRs) and blanking zones are examined. High-density velocity analysis is used to characterise areas of hydrate (higher velocity) and free gas (lower velocity). The high-density velocity analysis proved to be a very effective technique for examining the structure of gas migration chimneys. Two of the most interesting features identified in the data set include a blank dome shape with a gas chimney at its centre and a text book hydrate/free gas phase reversal that is examined in detail using amplitude vs offset (AVO) and inversion analysis techniques. The model for fluid flow and how the free gas from a chimney at the centre of the blanking zone is converted to hydrate is discussed. The hydrate and free gas phase reversal that is observed was formed by localised fluid flowing from depth into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). As the BSR becomes shallower, the sea floor deepens at this location. Without a localised fluid flow, the BSR would increase in depth with the increasing depth of the sea floor. Gas hydrate saturation and volumetric analyses were performed for one target. Concentrations were determined using empirical saturation formulae, confirming a potential target. The question of how much gas hydrate potentially is present in the basin, is discussed based both my work and that of others.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Hutt Valley, Capital & Coast and Wairarapa DHBs 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Southern District Health Board 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Midland Region 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Hawke's Bay 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in MidCentral and Whanganui 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the South Island 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Canterbury and the West Coast 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Northern District Health Boards 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • Framing the impact of climate change on health: the case of New Zealand’s online media

    Harrison, Sarah Robin (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Climate change is a major threat to public health both in New Zealand and abroad. Conversely, mitigation and adaption efforts offer numerous opportunities to improve health and equity. Despite this, comprehensive, government-led climate action is not forthcoming. The media plays an important role in shaping public opinion and support for policy change, and therefore may be critical for encouraging comprehensive climate action. In this research I undertook a qualitative thematic analysis of climate change and public health media coverage within the New Zealand Herald Online and Scoop, in order to examine how the relationship between climate change and public health is reported within New Zealand online media. The main objectives were: to examine how the relationship between climate change and public health is framed in the New Zealand Herald Online; to compare this framing with that of the content published in independent news repository Scoop; and to outline recommendations for public health advocates and journalists based on my results. To achieve these objectives, I undertook a thematic analysis of data collected from the New Zealand Herald Online and Scoop and interpreted key thematic frames within both outlets. These were based on a number of frames identified in the previous literature, and were also developed inductively as I engaged with the data. The overall thematic ‘story’ of each outlet was relatively similar. Content in both emphasised the negative threat that unchecked climate change poses to health. Press releases within Scoop were more likely to frame climate change in terms of the need for action and the possible health co-benefits of action, meaning the overall story in Scoop was more action-orientated and positive than in the New Zealand Herald Online. Coverage within both outlets framed ‘health’ in very limited terms and did little to discuss climate solutions that operate outside a free-market model of economic growth. Further, content in both outlets, Scoop in particular, emphasised contextually rich, de-personalised accounts of the health effects of climate change. Existing literature has suggested this impersonal and ‘boring’ framing may fail to capture audience attention about an already complex and largely ‘invisible’ issue. Public health advocates and journalists may wish to seek ways to make the issue of climate change and public health more personally relevant to New Zealand audiences, and more positive. The results of my research suggest that as a mainstream media outlet, the New Zealand Herald Online does not drastically reframe the issue of climate change and public health from how it is portrayed within press releases in Scoop. Therefore, advocates may need to adapt how they frame their press releases, not only so that the issue is considered more ‘newsworthy’ to mainstream media outlets, but also to more effectively encourage public understanding of, and support for climate action.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Nelson Marlborough and South Canterbury 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

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  • Translocation and post-release monitoring techniques of Auckland green gecko (Naultinus elegans elegans) using a penned release : a thesis in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Conservation Biology, Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand

    Scott, Sarah Naomi (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    A translocation of Auckland green gecko (Naultinus elegans elegans) using penned and hard releases is conducted during an emergency salvage in the Hunua Ranges, Auckland. The value of limiting individuals’ movement post-translocation is discussed. Radio-telometry as a resourceful long-term monitoring technique is also discussed including limitations.. The population of 52 individuals were salvaged prior to deforestation of habitat as part of the mitigation process in human-wildlife conflict. Translocations are a major part of New Zealand’s conservation strategies, and this event proved a unique opportunity to study post-release movements of Auckland green gecko (Naultinus elegans elegans). To test whether penned releases have an effect on post-release movements, salvaged geckos were divided into two groups. One group of individuals was released as a penned release and one group as a non-penned (hard) release. Using radio-telemetry, information was collected on movement behaviours post-release. 100% minimum convex polygons and 95% kernel estimates were used to establish areas for each individual and compared between the two release groups. Due to the small sample sizes, statistical power was low and no statistically significant differences were found between penned and non-penned release groups in terms of movement post-release. However, exploratory data analysis shows some differences in range particularly in relation to distance from release (m). It seems that penned released geckos tend to stay within the area of their release site compared with non-penned released geckos. This could be an early indication of territory and home range establishment from founder individuals. Multiple methods of monitoring post-translocation of green geckos as well as trapping and monitoring or mammalian predators within the area were carried out throughout the duration of the radio-telemetry aspect of the study. The benefits and limitations are discussed for each. Rat trapping in the release site area showed a trend with very low numbers caught (n=2) and high levels of mice prints throughout the general shrubland area. The presence of rat posion in the digestive tract of one rat caught during trapping leans towards successful pest control to date which is keeping numbers of rats at relatively low densities. Using penned release methods during wildlife translocations can prove to be an expensive and long-term endeavour. The practical use of penning Auckland green gecko post-release is still yet to be accurately defined in this study. Using radio tracking techniques to monitor the translocated individuals’ movement behaviours up to 4 weeks after release was successful. Using specific materials and harness designs that are the right ‘fit’ for the species is imperative as was shown with the unsuccessful use of the first design in this study. Transmitters allowed for the collection of detailed information of movement behaviours horizontal and vertical to be collected with ease. For cryptic, arboreal geckos this information would otherwise be difficult to attain if relying only on regular searching techniques such as spotlighting. Future translocations of gecko should consider using radio-telemetry to collect invaluable information for future translocation management decisions.

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  • The essential is in the incidental : a re-mediation of urban experience : an exegesis in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Fine Arts, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand

    Rose, Daniel (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    I drink coffee, take photos, and I would like to be a florist.

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  • The influence of shifting Pacific identities in learning : the experience of parents raising children of mixed Pacific ethnicities : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Education at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Leafe, Rachael Violeti (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Identity construction for the Pacific population in Aotearoa/New Zealand remains a politically and contextually contested arena that shifts according to the socio-cultural interactions within the immediate and external environment of an individual. This study views parents as agents of change and explores ethnic transmission and cultural identity development through the eyes of parents raising children of mixed Pacific ethnicities. This qualitative study employed both Western and Pacific methodologies to collect and analyse data and used the talanoa method to engage the insights and experiences of five couples. Social constructionism and Bronfenbrenner’s (2005) ecological systems theory provided a framework to explain the dynamics of social interactions and external conditions that influence the constructs of peoples’ lived realities. This study found that families, peers, and schools influence interactions that shift and impact the cultural identity development and resiliency of children with mixed Pacific ethnicities. In addition to this, societal perceptions, racism, and stereotypes are external environmental conditions that further impact cultural identity development and resiliency. The metaphor of a balancing act illustrates the challenges and strategies parents use to manage family and cultural expectations as well as the efforts required to maintain access and opportunities to cultural knowledge, values and practices. The findings suggest that a culturally responsive education can work to minimise intolerance, exclusion, and racism experienced by an individual. Key recommendations include the promotion of identity development education that serves to empower individuals and parents to nurture positive identities and resilience in the mixed Pacific generation.

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  • Distaste and nonsense : some critical reflections on the interface between comedy and contemporary art : Master of Fine Arts, Massey University, Wellington

    Morrison, Scott (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis investigates, through a largely video and performance based art practice, some of the relationships between Comedy, Contemporary art and psychological defence mechanisms. This body of work aims to challenge some preconceived notions of what comedy in an artistic context can be, including comedy that involves elements of disgust, irony, failure and anti-humour. The research here also attempts to find unique perspectives that have come about through the intersection of specific psychological defence mechanisms, experimental comedy, and contemporary art.

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  • Dancing from the inside out : using design thinking to explore the intersections of street dance, social media, and self-identity in Aotearoa : an exegesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Design, Massey University, College of Creative Arts, Wellington, New Zealand

    Smith, Phoebe J (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Street dance, derived from hip hop dance, is a vehicle for self-expression, connecting with others, understanding purpose, promoting confidence, challenging and improving oneself, and positively impacting participants’ lives (Henderson, 2010). Beyond a form of physical activity, it holds much potential to influence self-identity. Since the advent of YouTube in 2005, social media platforms—particularly YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram—have become central to street dance culture’s production and consumption. These networked mediascapes have increased the culture’s visibility, accessibility, participation, and provided a platform to share dance expression, join the international street dance community, as well as access or even create professional opportunities. The way street dance cultural flows circulate through social networking sites recursively shape and inform the culture itself. Dancing from the Inside Out uses design thinking methods to investigate how engagement with street dance culture in networked spaces—where self-identity is performed, actively constructed, and negotiated—might impact an individual’s relationship with street dance. Following empathy research, the project uses the Māori health and wellness model Te Whare Tapa Whā as an analytical framework, and identifies an opportunity to strengthen one’s taha wairua, or spiritual wellbeing, concerning ideas around self-expression and understanding identity. These concepts are at the heart of street dance culture and promote identity development, though risk being overridden by emerging cultural practices that digitally networked spaces have shaped. The project’s design response takes the form of Hikoi (Māori term meaning to step, stride, march)—the initiation of a movement starting in online social networking environments, in pursuit of the heart and soul of street dance. A practice-based design investigation, Hikoi movement builds a narrative across Facebook and Instagram, and using video portraits, blog posts, and still images, that adhere to a manifesto, aims to inform and inspire Aotearoa street dancers about strengthening taha wairua, in the age of social media.

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