33 results for 1900, Book item

  • Responses of salmonids to habitat changes

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Hall, James D.; Bisson, P. A.; Sedell, J. R. (1991)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Streams in western North America provide spawning and rearing habitats for several species of salmon and trout that are of substantial economic importance in the region. Timber that grows on lands through which these streams flow is also economically important, and its harvest can substantially change habitat conditions and aquatic production in salmonid streams. Undisturbed forests, the streams that flow through them, and the salmonid communities in these streams have intrinsic scientific, genetic, and cultural values in addition to their economic importance. The complex relations between salmonids and their physical environment, and the changes in these relations brought about by timber harvest, have been investigated extensively (see the bibliography by Macdonald et al. 1988). However, in spite of considerable evidence of profound changes in channel morphology and in light, temperature, and flow regimes associated with timber harvests, much uncertainty exists about the responses of salmonids to these changes.

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  • From assimilation to biculturalism: Changing patterns in Maori-Pakeha relationships

    Thomas, David R.; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (1996)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This chapter examines the changing patterns of inter-ethnic relationships among Maori and Pakeha in New Zealand, specifically the moves from assimilation towards biculturalism. The impact of recent debate about the Treaty of Waitangi is described and examples of bicultural policies and their consequences are outlined.

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  • The contructivist paradigm and some implications for science content and pedagogy

    Carr, Malcolm; Barker, Miles; Bell, Beverley; Biddulph, Fred; Jones, Alister; Kirkwood, Valda; Pearson, John; Symington, David (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Through a comparison of the widely-held traditional view of science with the constructivist view of science, we argue that the constructivist view of the content of science has important implications for classroom teaching and learning. This alternative view of science concepts as human constructs, scrutinised by application of the rules of the game of science, raises many challenges for teachers. Reconceptualisation of teachers' views of the nature of science and of learning in science is important for a constructivist pedagogy. We argue here that open discussion of the 'rules of the game' of science would contribute to better learning in the classroom, since learners would be better equipped to change their existing concepts by knowing more about the nature of science itself.

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  • Appendix A: Maps showing the distributions of lakes in New Zealand and their grouping into distinct districts reflecting the predominance of particular geological processes

    Green, John D.; Lowe, David J. (1987-01-01)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The large-scale maps of each of the lake districts show lakes with a maximum dimension ≥ c0.5 km.

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  • Appendix B: Some morphometric parameters of named lakes with areas [greater than or equal to] 1.0 km2, and some smaller lakes, in New Zealand

    Lowe, David J.; Green, John D. (1987-01-01)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Gaps indicate uncertainty or that accurate data are unavailable. Note that lakes with fluctuating levels e.g., those used for hydro-electric purposes, or near coasts have varying parameters. Table based mainly on Irwin (1975) with some data from Cunningham et al. (1953), Irwin (1972), Jolly & Brown (1975), Irwin & Pickrill (1983), Howard-Williams & Vincent 1984, Boswell et al. (1985), Livingstone et al. (1986), N.Z.O.I. Lake Chart series, N.Z. Topographical Map Series NZMS1 (1:63 360) and NZMS26O (1:50 000), and other sources.

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  • Technology and science education

    Jones, Alister; Compton, Vicki (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The incorporation of technology into the school curriculum is part of a worldwide trend in education. The way in which technology is incorporated depends on which country the reform is initiated in. The New Zealand Curriculum Framework (Ministry of Education, 1993a) includes science and technology as distinct learning areas. This chapter considers the view of technology expressed in both science in the New Zealand Curriculum (Ministry of Education, 1993b) and in Technology in the New Zealand Curriculum (Ministry of Education, 1995). The chapter is divided into four sections. Firstly, the concept of technology in the science curriculum is identified and discussed; secondly, the use of some types of technological application to enhance the learning of science outcomes is considered; thirdly, the technology curriculum itself is discussed in order to highlight the concept of technology underpinning this statement so that comparisons can be made with the concept employed in the science curriculum, and finally the introduction of technology outcomes by science teachers in a science environment is explored.

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  • Electronics and control technology

    Forret, Michael (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Until recently, there was no requirement to learn electronics and control technology in the New Zealand school curriculum. Apart from isolated pockets of teaching based on the enthusiasm of individual teachers, there is very little direct learning of electronics in New Zealand primary or secondary schools. The learning of electronics is located in tertiary vocational training programmes. Thus, few school students learn about electronics and few school teachers have experience in teaching it. Lack of experience with electronics (other than using its products) has contributed to a commonly held view of electronics as out of the control and intellectual grasp of the average person; the domain of the engineer, programmer and enthusiast with his or her special aptitude. This need not be true, but teachers' and parents' lack of experience with electronics is in danger of denying young learners access to the mainstream of modern technology.

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  • Technology education in the New Zealand curriculum

    Jones, Alister (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    In this chapter, the way in which experience of existing school programmes influences teacher perceptions of technology education is discussed, and reasons for teaching technology are outlined. A relationship between technology and technology education is suggested and the structure of technology education in the New Zealand technology curriculum is described. A particular focus is the role of technological activities in technology education, and this is developed in the final section.

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  • Towards an understanding of thermodynamic and kinetic controls on the formation of clay minerals from volcanic glass under various environmental conditions

    Hodder, A.P.W.; Naish, T.R.; Lowe, David J. (1996-01-01)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    lmogolite is the kinetically and thermodynamically favoured weathering product from rhyolitic volcanic glass in the soil-forming environment. However, on thermodynamic grounds imogolite would also appear to be the favoured alteration product of rhyolitic glass deposited in the nearshore marine environment. On the basis that the rate of conversion of glass to clay minerals is a function of the solubility of the clay mineral, smectite is expected to be formed under mildly diagenetic conditions, and formed more rapidly than imogolite in soil. The derived activation energies for formation of imogolite from glass in soils are appropriate for a diffusion controlled reaction, and appear consistent with the diffusion of the tetrahedrally co-ordinated species Al[iv](OH)₂(H2Q)⁺. In the marine environment, however the mechanism for all reactions appear to be surface reaction control.

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  • Parent materials of Yellow-brown loams in the Waikato-Coromandel district.

    Gibbs, H.S.; Lowe, David J.; Hogg, Alan G. (1982-01-01)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The yellow-brown loams of the Waikato-Coromandel region are derived from weathered airfall volcanic materials. These materials may be either direct airfall deposits, or erosion products of these deposits, described as reworked ash in some publications. In the erosion products small amounts of other rocks may be included in the parent materials, and these additions may modify to a slight degree the chemical and physical properties of the soil as a yellow-brown loam. In larger amounts these additions result in the formation of intergrades to yellow-brown earths or gley soils.

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  • Origins and development of the lakes

    Lowe, David J.; Green, John D. (1987)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Because of a turbulent and complex recent geological history, New Zealand has an impressively diverse and dynamic landscape, and a correspondingly wide array of lake types, within a small land area (Irwin 1975a; Soons & Selby 1982;). The development of such an active geological environment in New Zealand has been governed largely by its location athwart the Australian and Pacific plate boundary, and its maritime mid-latitude position has made it particularly sensitive to the climatic fluctations and associated glaciations and sea level changes of the Quaternary Period (Suggate et al. 1978). At present, the rates of uplift and erosion of mountainous areas are among the fastest in the world. Earthquakes are common, and volcanism has characterised much of the North Island during the Quaternary with numerous volcanoes active in the last few thousand years. Large, explosive caldera volcanoes in central North Island have erupted repeatedly over the last million years, producing voluminous amounts of lava and widespread pyroclastic deposits. The landforms, soils and lakes are thus typically youthful, almost all being younger than two million years; indeed, much of the landscape is of late Pleistocene and Holocene age, and is still actively developing (Pillans et al. 1982). Our purpose in this chapter is to outline the relationship between these often violent and spectacular geological processes which have led to the formation and development of the various lake types in New Zealand. Against this background we describe the classification and distribution of the main lake types, their ages and mechanisms of formation. We also comment on lake sedimentation patterns, palaeolimnological studies, and on features of lake bathymetry and morphology.

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  • The effect of climate on lake mixing patterns and temperatures

    Green, John D.; Viner, A.B.; Lowe, David J. (1987)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The maritime geographical location has been said to give distinctive characteristics of water mixing to lakes (Hutchinson 1957, pp. 443-444), but such effects have never been described in detail. New Zealand's lakes should exemplify well these maritime distinctions, and in this chapter features of water column mixing and temperature changes are identified which can distinguish New Zealand lakes from those elsewhere.

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  • Lakes

    Lowe, David J.; Green, John D. (1992-01-01)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Lakes have always held an aesthetic fascination for people; they figure prominently in both art and literature and have even been endowed with spiritual qualities. For example, the nineteenth century American writer Henry D. Thoreau (1854) considered a lake to be 'the landscape's most beautiful and expressive feature. It is the earth's eye; looking into which the beholder measures the depth of his own nature'. More prosaically, lakes are also of considerable geomorphological interest as dynamic landfonns originating in varied and often complex ways.

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  • The middle Waikato Basin and hills

    Selby, Michael J.; Lowe, David J. (1992-01-01)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The middle Waikato (or Hamilton) Basin is a roughly oval-shaped depression more than 80 km north to south and more than 40 km wide. The basin, except in the south, is almost completely surrounded by ranges up to 300 m high, broken by only a few gaps. In the south the basin floor rises gradually and merges with the dissected plateaux of the King Country.

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  • Workplace democracy and training reform: Some emerging insights from Australia and New Zealand

    Law, Michael; Piercy, Gemma Louise (1999)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This paper builds on a series of published articles and chapters that date back to the ESREA seminar on Adult education and the labour market held in Slovenia in 1993 Law, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998a, 1998b. The overarching purpose of that work has been to track and analyse, from a labour studies perspective, trade union strategies to education and training reform in Australia and New Zealand since the mid-1980s.

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  • Ta moko: Maori tattoo

    Te Awekotuku, Ngahuia (1997)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The author examines the history, technique and meaning of ta moko (Maori tattoo) from prehistory to modern times.

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  • “We’re just New Zealanders”: The Politics of Pakeha Identity

    Bell, Shirley (1996)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • 'Welcome to the Block': Priglashenie na kazn/ Invitation to a Beheading: A Documentary Record

    Boyd, Brian (1997)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Conservatism and constancy: New Zealand sexual culture in the era of AIDS

    Davis, PB; Lay-Yee, R; Jacobson, O (1996)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Geological Information in New Zealand

    Leaming, Elva (1999)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    New Zealand consists of two large is1ands--some 270,000 square kilometers in area--straddling a major crustal plate boundary. The present landscape is the highest part of a submerged subcontinent that broke away from Gondwana some 80 million years ago. To the northeast the Pacific oceanic plate is subducting westward, and to the southwest the Tasman seafloor is subducting eastward beneath the Campbell Plateau. These two subduction zones are linked through the transcurrent Alpine Fault. In the mid 19th Century two world-famous geologists contributed to the country's geological exploration. Hochstetter, from Austria, established a tradition of systematic geological mapping, and Hector, from Canada, founded the New Zealand Geological Survey. New Zealand's national geological organization, now the Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences (IGNS), continues to publish a broad spectrum of geological literature and maps. Its library holds the largest collection of geological literature pertaining to New Zealand. The six universities that teach geology and earth sciences each have library collections of a high standard. The University of Auckland Geology Collection is housed in the Science Library with an area that is a focal point for geological information and literature research.

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