13 results for 1900, Unclassified

  • The use of fuzzy tools for small scale decision support systems

    Moyle, Sam A (1999)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    This paper discusses the use of fuzzy tools in the realm of Decision Support Systems. I have investigated the possible use of a number of different paradigms against a novel problem - that of correctly classifying the maintenance required on a concrete tiled roof, given certain input values.

    View record details
  • The development of Rugby Super 12 and its implications for tourism: the case of the Otago Highlanders

    Higham, James E S; Hinch, Tom (1999-02)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    This report presents a detailed analysis of the impacts of Rugby Super 12 on the tourism industry in the Otago Highlanders region. It presents the results of a qualitative programme of research for which individuals involved in the administration of Rugby Super 12 (rugby unions) and tourism development (local government and tourism promotion offices) were interviewed. A sport tourism framework is presented in this report and used to explore the impacts of sport on the spatial and temporal dimensions of tourism. The manner in which Rugby Super 12 affects travel patterns and offers potential for tourism development in the Highlanders region is then explored. Study participants felt that Rugby Super 12 has had significant implications for tourism in Southern New Zealand. It was seen as generating increased domestic travel into and within the region, attracting people who had little previous interest in rugby and encouraging international visitors to make rugby spectatorship part of their New Zealand tour itinerary. The introduction of Rugby Super 12 to the region was reported as having increased: the numbers of people travelling, their length of stay and their spending patterns. The Highlanders were also seen to present tourism development potential in terms of: • The promotion of Dunedin as an urban tourism destination (eg., floodlit night sport). • The further evolution of Carisbrook as an urban tourism icon. • The promotion of the heritage, history, lifestyles and attractions within the region. • The differentiation of the Southern Macro-region from other regions in New Zealand. • The promotion of the region as an international tourism destination through the televising of Highlanders games to international audiences. Rugby Super 12 was seen as benefiting the tourism sector within the region and offering great potential for further benefits. Capturing these benefits requires that the promotional opportunities presented by the Highlanders team (and the star players within it) be incorporated into tourism development strategies. It was also recognized that while Rugby Super 12 has had positive implications for tourism, the same is true for the impact of tourism on the Highlanders franchise. That is, the travel patterns generated by Rugby Super 12 benefit the tourism industry (people travelling further to be involved in sporting occasions) but increased tourism also benefits Otago rugby (e.g., through ground attendance, atmosphere, expanded supporter base, merchandise/ food and beverage/ season ticket sales). Additional research in this area will provide an information base upon which to make decisions that can maximize the mutual benefits of this relationship between sport and tourism.

    View record details
  • Analysis of the Australian data from the Cartoon Network's New GenerAsians survey: Presentation made in conjunction with the Sydney release of data from the 12 Asian nation study of youth attitudes, perceptions and behaviours at the Regent Hotel, Sydney, 4th August, 1998

    Bridgman, Geoff (1998-08)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Are Australian children unique or are they similar to other children in Asia? In my short review of the truly massive amount of data collected in the Cartoon Networks New GenerAsians survey, I can only touch upon, in a speculative manner some of the interesting findings. These include the importance placed on friendship by Australian children and how that may diminish other institutions like home and school, their belief in importance of individuality, their high access to electronic media, and how this competes with TV. Also there are interesting age and gender patterns.

    View record details
  • Report on the self-access centre at Unitec

    Burns, Trish; Martin-Blaker, Jeannie (1998-05)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This report outlines the background of self-access learning, describes the situation of the existing Self-Access Centre at UNITEC, highlights the characteristics of the leading Self-Access Centres in New Zealand and around the world, and makes recommendations regarding the future development of the Centre at Unitec in the areas of physical layout, systems, resources, services, and staffing. It presents a range of options regarding the future location of the SAC, with the implications involved in each.

    View record details
  • Analysis of the Hong Kong data from the Cartoon Network's New GenerAsians Survey: Presentation made in conjunction with the Hong Kong release of data from the 12 Asian nation study of youth attitudes, perceptions and behaviours at the New World Harbourview Hotel, Hong Kong, 23rd June, 1998

    Bridgman, Geoff (1998-06)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    As a researcher on the impact of television on children, I'm interested in the relationship between watching TV and other activities.

    View record details
  • Television watching, enjoyment of school and respect for parents: Analysis of the Indian data from the Cartoon Network's New GenerAsians survey: Presentation made in conjunction with the New Dehli release of data from the 12 Asian nation study of youth attitudes, perceptions and behaviours at the Taj Mahal Hotel, New Delhi, 22nd July, 1998

    Bridgman, Geoff (1998-07)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    As a researcher on the impact of television violence on children, I'm interested in the relationship between television generally and children's behaviour. As parents we worry about the impact of TV on our children, particularly we worry that that our children watch too much TV and that this will affect their education. The Indian results seemed to go against conventional wisdom, for what we found was a country where children appeared to be more enthusiastic about TV than anywhere else, and yet their enthusiasm for school and family were unexcelled.

    View record details
  • Book Review-- Environmental Planning in New Zealand

    Milke, M.W. (1993)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    View record details
  • The post-auricular muscle reflex (PAMR): Its detection, analysis, and use as an objective hearing test

    O'Beirne, G.A. (1998)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    A number of fundamental characteristics of the post-auricular muscle response (PAMR) have been examined in adult and infant human subjects using an automated computer-based measurement system. This system allowed simultaneous examination of the changes in background electrical activity of the PAM, and extraction of information regarding the sound-evoked PAMR waveform, such as response amplitude and peak latency. It was found that the PAMR was best recorded using an active electrode located directly over the body of the muscle, and a reference electrode located on the dorsal surface of the pinna. In addition, it was found that during lateral rotation of the eyes towards the recording electrodes the peak-to-peak amplitude of the PAMR increased by an average of 525%. The increase in response amplitude was highly correlated with the increase in EMG observed during this manoeuvre, suggesting that the mechanisms that increase both EMG and PAMR amplitude probably occur at a common point. The voltage spectrum of the PAMR was also measured. Contrary to previous findings (Thornton, 1975), the voltage spectrum of the PAMR extended from 10 Hz to approximately 550 Hz, with a broad spectral peak centred between 70 Hz and 115 Hz. Finally, a cheap, efficient and reliable objective hearing test was developed, using the correlation measure of the PAMR. The availability of such a device has the potential to vastly increase the number of children that are screened for hearing disorders, especially in poorer communities who do not have the funds or the expertise to establish screening programs using the currently available objective techniques of ABR and oto-acoustic emission measurement.

    View record details
  • Handmaid to Genius

    Boyd, BD (1999-05-15)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Margaret Mead and Derek Freeman: Bibliography of a Controversy

    Laurie, John (1998)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    Derek Freeman???s 1983 attack on Margaret Mead???s classic Samoan ethnography, Coming of age in Samoa, aroused an unprecedented level of interest in the world of anthropology and among the educated public. That interest continues, over a decade later, with the publication of a play based on the lives of Mead and Freeman, and a major new book. The issues, of the nature of humankind and human society, are central to our understanding of humanity and the establishment of good relationships among the peoples of the world. Mead???s Coming of age in Samoa is probably the best known anthropological work ever written and has had a major influence on popular perceptions of Western society and indigenous cultures. Freeman???s claim, that Mead deliberately exaggerated the differences between Samoa and the West in order to advance a particular political agenda, that all human cultures are rooted in a particular biological human nature which is an inheritance from our primate ancestors, and that the study of cultures should have reference to this universal set of human proclivities and tendencies (which different cultural structures and institutions have evolved to guide and restrain) has serious implications for an anthropology which has generally abandoned attempts to explain similarities to concentrate on differences. At this theoretical level there has been much debate about Boas??? commitment to physical anthropology. The critical point is surely that a commitment to cultural determinism does not preclude an interest in biological variables. It is a question of which direction of influence is studied. One of Boas??? main contributions appears to have been to attempt to prove that even such apparently biological variables as head shape are determined by environmental rather than inherited factors. Unlike the early years of the 20th century, it is now the believers in cultural determinism who are insisting on dramatic differences between different societies and those proposing a greater role for biological factors who are arguing the fundamental unity of the human species.

    View record details
  • Book Review-- Technologies for Environmental Clean-Up: Soil and Groundwater

    Milke, M.W. (1994)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    View record details
  • Summaries of key policy documents in the 1980s

    Tobias, R.M. (1993)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper provides summaries of the recommendations of eight government reports on adult and community education that were published between 1985 and 1989, together with a brief description of the background to each of these reports.

    View record details
  • Review of Quebec???s aboriginal languages: History, planning and development, by Jacques Maurais (Ed.)

    Brown, Gavin (1998)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    Jacques Maurais (Ed.). Quebec???s Aboriginal Languages: History, Planning and Development. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters Ltd. 1996. Pp: xiv, 334

    View record details