9,550 results for 1900

  • Nga riwai: Maori potatoes.

    Harris, G. F.; Niha, P. P. (1999)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    It is generally accepted by scholars that potatoes were first introduced to New Zealand in the late eighteenth century by Captain James Cook and the French explorer, Marion du Fresne. Further introductions from a variety of sources, including possible direct introductions from South America, followed into the nineteenth century. Maori were quick to recognise the advantages these new introductions had over the kumara (Ipomea batatas) and other traditional food sources. Potatoes soon became both a staple item in the Maori diet and a trade commodity. The various cultivars (cultivated varieties) were given Maori names and many of these early introductions are still grown by Maori today. These 'Maori potatoes' with their deep-set eyes, often knobbly irregular shape and colourful tubers, are quite distinct from modern potatoes and are known as Maori as riwai, taewa, parareka and mahetau.

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  • Stakeholder influences on assessment methodology.

    Warren, J. M. (1998)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    This is a Work-in-Progress paper backgrounding a research activity currently being undertaken in New Zealand establishing the requirements for assessment from various stakeholders and comparing to educational philosophies. Part of the initial study investigates the requirements of human resource practitioners, who are registered members of the Institute of Personnel Managers (IPM), when recruiting for management positions. The study contrasts qualifications obtained as certification under the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA) unit standards and degrees obtained through universities. This reinforced the tension between the need to provide education at degree level, with aims to develop autonomous decision makers, and the NZQA level 7 which assesses observable competencies in the skills to perform required managerial functions. The research attempts to identify the stakeholders in education including industry, education and training providers, professional associations, and the individual students. There are future plans to extend investigations from New Zealand into Australasian and global requirements. This paper will review earlier philosophical debates between providing education and training and examine works alerting educationalists to the danger of increasingly assessing for diplomas of specific abilities. This and the current concerns still emphasising contrasting concepts of teaching between technocratic-reductionist and professional-contextualist based philosophies will be incorporated into research and the requirements of various stakeholders will be examined. A paper has been presented at the recent ANZAM Conference [Warren, 1997] with a request for interested parties to share information and experiences of the application of competency-based standards within a qualification framework and to share experiences of other frameworks. The next stage of this research is outlined with the preparation and use of questionnaires for identified primary stakeholders.

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  • Tumatanui: The experience of a group of Maori funeral directors: (A bicultural research project).

    Taurima, W.; Cash, M. (1999)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    Kia Ora He Roa rawa te iwi Maori e ratu ana he oranga, e kahore hoki te Maori e whaka takato kaupapa, oranga no reira matika ake to matou ropu me o matou whakaora, ki te tiro tiro me te whakatiki ? tika, me pehea, na tenei kupapa e puta ai e tenei ao huri huri. Ka hikoi matou ke te rapu, ki te pa-tai-tai, me pehea ra I puta ai, te kaha o tenei roopu Maori mo te Maori, I ranga tira ai ratou, ai ratou mahi? A ka titiro matou ki o matou awanga ? wanga ano, kei takakahi matou, I o ratou whakaaro ke pouri ratou. Te ropu nei- he tangata, whaka takoto, tupa-paku. Ka tahu matou ka titiro, he tino rereke, tenei ropu Maori ? he pakari, he matau hoki ki te whaka-puta e tenei kaupapa (kawa). Ka kite matou koia nei te taonga hei whai nga e Matou ? tuatahi. Ki te reo o te iwi Maori, whakaronga. Ka nga taringa me te ngakau kia ronga kia mohio, te iwi e rua nga kaupapa, he titiro tanga ma matou. Tuatahi ko te ture me te kawa o te marae. Ko te marae hoki te kainga hei kohi-kohi e te matauranga o tenei ropu, a me matou hoki te tohunga e whai haere nei. Te kaupapa Maori mo te whanau, hapu ranei. Tuara ? me kohi hoki e nga whaka ? auaki me nga whakapapa ? e ihi nei matou ?Tumatanui? ? mo te whanau e whai mai nei a po-po. Ta matou kaupapa kia mohio ai nga tangata I nga korero ?E ki ana tetahi o nga kai mahi na korero, tino tau-reka-reka tenei kaupapa ? I homai nga I to tatou kai hanga?. Te meanui kia kite ai te ao, ke tei kaha, kia tonu tatou te iwi whenua, ki te rapu ora ? e ngari whaka puaki ? nga mai te tauira ? kia kotahi ai tatou. For many years Maori business has been researched, but in a non-Maori way. Our aim was to correct this: to examine, in a culturally appropriate way, how Maori enterprises survive and thrive in a monocultural business world. Our goal was to find some answers to the question: ?What makes a Maori business Maori? We began our journey by looking at a very specific and culturally sensitive area of business: Maori funeral directors. We recognised that here Maori business people seemed to do business differently. The stories of four families of funeral directors had one striking feature in common ? they were all skilled at ?breaking the oundaries?. This became the title of our first research project. To enable the ?voice? of the Maori enterprises to be eard, we have developed two research tools. The first is a research ?protocol?. This protocol allows knowledge gathering to take place in a way that respects the knowledge of the participants, who are the principal researchers, and is responsible to them and through Maori ?mentors?, to the Maori community. The second tool is a culturally appropriate way of gathering stories. We call this way ?tumatanui? or ?opening up? stories. Our purpose is to allow the stories about what one participant called ?the most callous industry that our heavenly father ever allowed to be created?, to be heard. These stories will challenge the New Zealand business community to look again at the advantages that could be gained by working together in a bicultural way.

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  • The learning styles of first year distance education students.

    Hutton, J. L. (1998)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of research in progress on the learning styles of first year students studying with The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand. The paper reviews background literature on learning styles and distance education. It examines the learning styles profiles of the students and discusses the instructional design implications of those profiles.

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  • Perceptions of the average driver's speed compared to perceived driver safety and driving skill.

    Walton, D.; Bathurst, J. (1998)

    Working or discussion paper
    Open Polytechnic

    This study investigates the self-enhancement bias in driver attitudes, the finding that drivers rate themselves better than the average driver on safety and skill perceptions (Svenson, 1978, 1981; McCormick, Walkey & Green, 1986). A sample of 86 New Zealand drivers were asked their perceptions of their own and others' speeds in two conditions, 50 km/h and 100 km/h. The results established the self-enhancement bias for speed and safety, but not skill. Between 85% and 90% of drivers claimed to drive slower than the 'average driver.' A new methodological technique derived from Harr? and Gillett (1994) was used to investigate the direction of the self-enhancement bias. The results support Downward Comparison Theory (Wills, 1981) because drivers consider other drivers negatively, rather than exaggerating their self-perceptions.

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  • Developments in the provision of quality electronic summative assessments.

    French, P. (1998)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    This is a Work in Progress paper backgrounding a research area which is to be developed further at the Open Polytechnic. This initial study overviews the written and electronic literature available at 29 June 1998 identifying developments in the field of electronic assessment. In this study I have focused on ascertaining what was available electronically in summative assessment methods. For some institutions this has simply resulted in the range of traditional forms of assessment being translated onto a computer, while other groups have developed variations available only because of computer usage. This has ranged from the use of electronic mail to transmit assignments between student and tutors to the development of computer adaptive testing. Specifically the study covers summative testing via multichoice questions, constructed answers, essays and practical performance assessments via simulations. There is little information available on summative electronic testing in alternative forms of assessment and so this study does not specifically cover learning contracts, projects, peer assessment, oral examinations, seminar presentations, case studies, laboratory work, or other submitted written work such as literature reviews, book reviews, reports or journalling. The next stage of the research is to select an appropriate electronic medium for application to an Open Polytechnic programme and to explore the conversion of the assessments in this programme to an electronic base.

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  • The first time-derivative of the EEG: A possible proxy for the order-parameter for the cerebral cortex

    Sleigh, James W.; Steyn-Ross, D. Alistair; Steyn-Ross, Moira L. (1998)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Many important aspects of the function of the cerebral cortex can be captured in a two dimensional lattice model. From this analogy, the change from the awake state to the unconscious state can be understood as a form of order/disorder phase transition . If this is so, there should exist an order-parameter that has zero value when the cortex is disordered (the anaesthetic state), and which rapidly climbs to an arbitrary positive value when the cortex becomes ordered (the awake state). Although the `spatially-meaned soma potential' v of the cortex, relative to its unconscious state value v0, can be considered to be the order-parameter, it is not possible to measure the mean soma potential directly. However, fluctuations in the soma potential give rise to the time-varying EEG signal v(t) which is easily measured.

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  • Principal appraisal : fluxion and abatement : a grounded theory of principal appraisal in a small selection of New Zealand schools : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Educational Administration at Massey University

    Strong, Neville G. L (1998)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the circumstances in and around the principal appraisal process in five New Zealand primary schools. An outcome of this investigation was to generate a theoretical explanation of what was happening in this appraisal process. Data were gathered from five principals and their appraisers through a questionnaire and an interview. Through a constant comparative analysis of the data, a basic social process was discovered that consisted of four conceptual categories labelled as metamorphosis, metamorphic reaction, adaptation and palatableness. These categories were linked into a core category labelled fluxion and abatement. Fluxion and abatement is a conceptual statement of a continually changing appraisal process that has been grappled with and abated in a meaningful way by the appraisal participants. That no school site, of principal appraisal development and implementation, closely resembles another, is testimony of the fluxion and abatement theory. That schools are still talking of adaptation to the latest metamorphosis of professional standards and that a palatableness state is some time, even years, away, strengthens the theory produced in this study. These findings have important implications for a number of areas of school operation. The first is leadership. Will the school site strengthen or move away from a collaborative model of leadership? The study argues for a supportive board of trustees to the principal, who should engender a transformational leadership style. These collaborative approaches will see schools as educative communities rather than managed organisations. The second implication is in teaching and learning. Principals, working with their staff, need to have refined the meaningful data on what is happening in teaching and learning within their schools. The third implication is the principal appraisal process. This process should be used as a purposeful tool to achieve and produce evidence of the other stated implications. The last implication, school effectiveness, is the prospective outcome of such a principal appraisal process.

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  • Late Miocene paleo-geomorphology of the Bakony-Balaton Highland Volcanic Field (Hungary) using physical volcanology data

    Nemeth, Karoly; Martin, Ulrike (1999-01-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    A new view is presented of the Bakony-Balaton Highland Volcanic Field (BBHVF), Hungary, active in late Miocene and built up of ca. 100 mostly alkaline basaltic eruptive centers, scoria cones, tuff rings, maar volcanic complexes and shield volcanoes. A detailed map shows the physical volcanology of the monogenetic volcanic field. In areas where thick Pannonian Sandstone beds build up the pre-volcanic strata normal maar volcanic centers have formed with usually thick late magmatic infill in the maar basins. In areas, where relatively thin Pannonian Sandstone beds resting on thick Mesozoic or Paleozoic fracture-controlled, karsrwater-bearing aquifer, large unusual maar volcanic sequences appear (Tihany type maar volcanoes). In the northern pare of the field large former scoria cones and shield volcanoes give evidence for a smaller impact of the ground and surface water causing phreatomagmatic explosive activity. The Tihany type maar volcanic centers are usually filled by thick maar lake deposits, building up Gilbert type gravelly, scoria rich deltas in the northern side of the maar basins, suggesting a mostly north to south fluvial system in the pre-volcanic surface. Calculating paleosurface elevation for the eruptive centers, two paleo-geomorphology maps are drawn for a younger (4-2.8 Ma) and an older (7.54-4 Ma) scenario. The erosion rate of the volcanic field is estimated to vary between 96 m/Ma and 18 m/Ma. In the western site of BBHVF the erosion rate is higher (more than 60 m/Ma, Tapolca Basin), and an average 50 m/Ma in the center and eastern side.

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  • Large hydrovolcanic field in the Pannonian Basin: general characteristics of the Bakony- Balaton Highland Volcanic Field, Hungary.

    Nemeth, Karoly; Martin, Ulrike (1999-01-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    No abstract available

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  • Subaqueous volcanism and their depositional processes, their relationship to subaerial volcanism: review

    Nemeth, Karoly (1999-01-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    A vizalatti vulkanizmus jelenségei és üledékképződési folyamatai, kapcsolatai a szárazföldi vulkáni folyamatokkal: attekintes (Subaqueous volcanism and their depositional processes, their relationship to subaerial volcanism: review)

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  • Eroded porous-media aquifer controlled hydrovolcanic centers in the South Lake Balaton Region, Hungary: The Boglár Volcano

    Nemeth, Karoly; Martin, Ulrike; Philippe, Marc (1999-01-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    No abstract available

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  • The production and consumption of history : a discourse on heritage and nostalgia in the 1990s : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Geography at Massey University

    Brown, Annette Margaret (1998)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The dialectic of history as an ideology and history as a commodity can underpin a discourse on the production and consumption of history as heritage and nostalgia in the 1990s. History as an ideology is erased from the dominant space of representation, by history as a commodiy; therefore, history as an ideology needs to be discussed separately from history as a commodity even though they are not independent categories; this is because they are mutually constitutive of each other. The processes and structures that underwrite this dialectic, Capitalism and Modernity, produce different outcomes in different places and at different times; outcomes such as the cabinets of curiosity during early modernity, modernist and postmodernist museums, heritage sites such as country houses, a shopping mall and a disneyfied theme park arranged around a historic locale and the gentrification of some parts of the inner City of London. These objects of history are produced, reproduced and consumed by social actors in different places and at different times. The production and consumption of history as an object does not explain why these particular outcomes exist in the places and the times that they do. These outcomes need to be explained, and can be explained, by using a dialectical methodology. Such an explanation would look at the underlying processes and structures of Capitalism and modernity.

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  • Tourism in the Manawatu : an analysis of spatial patterns in the demand for and supply of motel accommodation : a thesis ... for the degree of Master of Arts in Geography at Massey University

    Devi, Vijaya (1981)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The study concerns one form of accommodation, the motel, in the Manawatu, a non-key tourist area in New Zealand. Initially prompted by a claim that Palmerston North, the regional centre, was losing out on important conference custom because of a shortage of accommodation, the study considers this question and proceeds to both describe and analyse motel characteristics in the region. Description includes salient characteristics of moteliers, motels and clients obtained from a questionnaire survey conducted in May 1980. Spatial variations in the characteristics are accounted for in terms of centre types: regional, subregional, market and recreation centres. The theory of hierarchical diffusion and the concept of central places are used in an attempt to explain the location of motels. Findings showed that a large proportion of tourist traffic comprised transient tourists; the shortage of accommodation at Palmerston North appeared to be seasonal rather than absolute; accessibility in terms of visibility did not influence profit and some measure of 'amateurism' was evident in motel management. Time constraints and the limited area of study, however, could have influenced these general findings. It is suggested that transit tourism may be important in other non-key tourist areas, most obviously in the Waikato because of its similarity to the Manawatu, and that further study of this overlooked aspect of tourism seems worthwhile.

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  • Dairy Deregulation and Low-Input Dairy Production: A Bioeconomic Evaluation

    Tozer, PR; Huffaker, RG (1999-07)


    Massey University

    Deregulation of the Australian dairy industry could affect the utilization of resources by milk producers and the profitability of dairy production. In this study we examine the feed mix that dairy producers use, both pastures and supplements, under partial and total deregulation. We are particularly interested in the interaction of pasture utilization and farm profitability. The results of this research demonstrate that profitable low-input dairying is constrained by the most limiting resource, feed supplied by pasture, and that the interactions between economic and biological processes are critical to farm profitability.

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  • The value of the world's ecosystem services and natural capital

    Costanza, R; d'Arge, R; de Groot, R; Faber, S; Grasso, M; Hannon, B; Limburg, K; Naeem, S; O'Neill, RV; Paruelo, J; Raskin, RG; Sutton, P; van den Belt, M (1997-05-15)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    The services of ecological systems and the natural capital stocks that produce them are critical to the functioning of the Earth’s life-support system. They contribute to human welfare, both directly and indirectly, and therefore represent part of the total economic value of the planet. We have estimated the current economic value of 17 ecosystem services for 16 biomes, based on published studies and a few original calculations. For the entire biosphere, the value (most of which is outside the market) is estimated to be in the range of US$16–54 trillion (1012) per year, with an average of US$33 trillion per year. Because of the nature of the uncertainties, this must be considered a minimum estimate. Global gross national product total is around US$18 trillion per year.

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  • The Whalemen of Foveaux Strait, 1829-1850

    Irwin, Cecil H (1948)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: iii, 187 p. [9] leaves of plates : ill., diagrs., maps. Notes: Original lacks p.160. Thesis (M. A.)--University of Otago, 1948. Microfilm. 1 reel microfilm (negative).

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  • A study of some New Zealand natural products.

    Jogia, Madhu Kant (1985)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xii, 348 leaves :col. ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Chemistry

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  • He kupu tuku iho mo tenei reanga : Te ahua o te tuku korero

    Higgins, Rawinia Ruth (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    170 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Māori, Pacific and Indigenous Studies. "March 1999."

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  • Investigation into the business and operations of Carlton Party Hire Limited.

    Hart, Graeme Richard (1988)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    107 leaves. University of Otago programme: MBA. From title page: "Project 660".

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