231 results for 2000, Conference poster

  • Cell proliferative and radioprotective properties of bioactive Salvia sclareoides extracts

    Ruivo, D; Oliveira, Maria; Rauter, AP; Justino, J; Goulart, M (2008-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Characterisation of the Genetic and Hormone controls of Branching in Petunia

    Simons, Joanne; Templeton, K; Plummer, K; Beveridge, C; Snowden, K (2004-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Can we minimize androgen deprivation therapy-related quality of life effects in Māori & Pacific prostate cancer survivors using a genetic stratification?

    Karunasinghe, N; Zhu, Y; Han, Dug; Lange, K; Wang, A; Zhu, Shuotun; Masters, J; Goudie, M; Keogh, J; Benjamin, B; Holmes, M; Ferguson, Lynnette (2015-11-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    BACKGROUND: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is an effective palliation treatment for men with advanced prostate cancer (PC). This is a common treatment received by the majority of PC survivors among New Zealand (NZ) Maori men due to their late presentation of the disease. However, ADT have well documented side effects that could alter the patient’s quality of life (QoL). ADT involves suppression of androgens produced either by the testes or the adrenal gland or both. Adrenal androgen production involves conversion of androstenedione to testosterone by the aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) enzyme. We have previously reported that the AKR1C3 rs12529 G allele is associated with a lower prostate specific antigen (PSA) level, which is a downstream product of androgens binding to the androgen receptor. The AKR1C3 rs12529 G allele frequency is 14.2% higher among Māori, Pacific and East Asian men compared to Caucasians in our study cohort. Therefore, the current assessment is to evaluate whether genetic stratification with the AKR1C3 rs12529 polymorphism could support decision making on ADT to minimize QoL effects. METHODS: A patient cohort with confirmed clinical diagnoses of PC was recruited with written consent from 2006-2014 to Urology studies carried out at the Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, University of Auckland, NZ. Recruitment was carried out at hospitals managed under three District Health Boards of Auckland, and private Urology clinics from Waikato District, in NZ. From May 2013, patients were invited to complete a questionnaire that contained options for selecting PC treatment type/s received and a QoL survey. The primary outcomes were the percentage scores under each QoL subscale assessed using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30 and PR25). Genotyping of these men for the AKR1C3 rs12529 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was carried out using the Sequenom MassArray and iPlex system or the Applied Biosystem’s Taqman SNP genotyping procedure. Age at diagnosis, Gleason score and alcohol consumption were confounding variables between ADT and no ADT groups, and were corrected for subsequent analysis. Analysis of QoL scores were carried out against ADT duration or in association with the AKR1C3 rs12529 SNP using the Generalised Linear Model. P-values <0.02]. This increase among the rs12529 GG genotype (9.7) is therefore, equivalent to 59% of the mean hormone treatment-related symptom score of 16.5 (SD16.6) recorded in this study. INTERPRETATION: As 85.3% ADT recipients have used AA the current study is best interpreted as QoL effects of AAs. This study suggests a possibility for those stratified with the AKR1C3 rs12529 G allele to receive intermittent AA treatment to minimize QoL effects. If larger prospective studies can confirm these findings, PC survivors particularly those of Maori and Pacific ethnic groups may greatly benefit through optimal ADT options not only for their survival benefits, but also to better maintain their QoL.

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  • Metabolic Outcomes in children born to mothers with severe hyperemesis gravidarum

    Ayyavoo, A; Hofman, Paul; Derraik, J; Mathai, M; Stone, P; Bloomfield, F; Cutfield, C (2012-06-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Etiology of increasing incidence of congenital hypothyroidism in New Zealand from 1993 to 2010

    Albert, B; Jefferies, C; Webster, D; Cutfield, W; Gunn, A; Carll, J; Bendikson, K; Derraik, J; Hofman, Paul (2012-06-24)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Lower Limb Estimation from Sparse Landmarks using an Articulated Shape Model

    Zhang, Ju; Hislop-Jambrich, J; Besier, Thor (2016-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Rapid generation of lower limb musculoskeletal models is essential for patient-specific gait modeling. Motion-capture is a routine part of gait assessment but contains relatively sparse geometric information. We present an articulated statistical shape model of the lower limb that estimates realistic bone geometry, pose, and muscle attachment regions from seven commonly used motion-capture markers. Our method obtained a lower (p=0.02) surface error of 4.5 mm RMS compared to 8.5 mm RMS using standard isotropic scaling, and was more robust, converging in all 26 test cases compared to 20 for isotropic scaling.

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  • Refractive errors in the Maldives: a pilot study

    Kandel, H; Kaphle, D; Gyawali, R; Khanal, Safal; Upadhyaya, S (2014-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Using network science to explore innovation

    O'Neale, DR; Hendy, SH (2013-06-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We live in a world were scientific and technical advances require increasingly specialised knowledge while drawing expertise from ever more diverse technical areas. In an effort to better understand the relationships between different areas of innovation, and the role of specialisation, diversity and ubiquity in national and regional economies, we have mined several million patent records from the European Patent Office, along with their classification codes, and used them to construct a network of “patent-space”. Patents provide a rich data set when studying innovation. Networks of scientific publications, such as that in [1], formed from inter-journal citations, illustrate the links between different disciplines as new knowledge is created, while networks of countries and the goods they export, such as the “product-space” network in [2], give insight into the economic complexity (or otherwise) and the likely areas of growth for national economies. Using patents allows us to take an intermediate view and investigate the role of science and innovation in economic growth. We take an approach similar to [2], identifying when individual countries or geographic regions have a “revealed comparative advantage” with respect to particular technical areas. We have constructed a proximity network as a base-map for the space of patentable innovation. We find that patent-space is heterogeneous and highly structured, and that the structure depends on the size or “granularity” of the regions that data is aggregated into. By overlaying data for particular regions on the patent-space base map we are able to explore temporal and regional trends – in particular how the innovation systems of different countries has produced quite different areas of specialisation. Figure 1: Patent-space for New Zealand (left) and South Korea (right) - two countries with very different innovation systems. Nodes represent patent classification classes. Nodes are dark when the country has a comparative advantage in that area and faded out otherwise. Nodes are connected if a comparative advantage with respect to one classification tends to occur in conjunction with a connected classification. [1] L. Leydesdorff & I. Rafols, Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (2008). [2] C. Hidalgo & R. Hausmann, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2009).

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  • In Vitro Immunogenicity Screening of Two Novel Bone Graft Scaffolds

    Lock, Alistair; Gao, Yang; Callon, Karen; Pool, B; Choi, A; Munro, Jacob; Cornish, Jillian; Musson, David (2015-11-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Talking Allowed!

    Davies, Maree; Sinclair, A (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Research on the Paideia Method (a method for discussing a topic) was conducted in 20 classrooms across five schools, of varying socioeconomic environments (ages 11-13) in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2010. The researchers sought to further examine the results from their pilot study of the Paideia Seminar, entitled 'Talking Allowed: I like it when the teacher lets us talk without telling us what to say', trialed in 2008 (Sinclair & Davies, 2011). In addition, in order to provide the optimum conditions to prepare the students for the face-to-face seminars, an online component (open source software) was added as an alternative medium to assist students in their preparation. The research questions were: What happens to the Nature of Interaction, and the Complexity of the Discussion when students participate in a Paideia Seminar, and an on-line discussion in preparation for the face-to-face seminar? What is the optimal role of the teacher when participating in a Paideia Seminar and an on-line discussion to increase complexity of discussion?

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  • High Pressure and Thermal Processing of kiwifruit puree: the effect on antioxidants and vitamin C

    Soloman, N; Oliveira, Maria (2011-11-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Regional Structure of Technical Innovation

    O'Neale, DR; Hendy, SC (2014-06-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    There is strong evidence that the productivity per capita of cities and regions increases with population. One likely factor behind this phenomenon is agglomeration; densely populated regions are able to bring together otherwise unlikely combinations of individuals and organisations with diverse, specialised capabilities. But clearly not all possible combinations of capability are equally valuable, nor are they equally likely. In order to investigate patterns in the typical combinations of capabilities, we have used the REGPAT patent database to construct a bipartite network of geographic regions and the patent classes for which those regions display a revealed comparative advantage. By identifying the pairs of patent classes that are most likely to co-occur within regions, we can infer relationships between the classes, giving a new network that maps out the structure of technical innovation. The resulting network has a core-periphery structure with a central group of highly connected technologies surrounded by branches of more specialised combinations. We investigate measures such as the diversity of regional patent portfolios and the ubiquity of patent classes across regions. We find that diversity is positively correlated with regional population, while the average ubiquity of patents in a region’s patent portfolio is negatively correlated. This suggests that more populous regions are able to expand into more specialised and higher value parts of the patent network.

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  • Retrospective host specificity testing of Cotesia urabae to assess the risk posed to the New Zealand nolid moth Celama parvitis

    Avila Olesen, Gonzalo; Withers, TM; Holwell, GI (2014-08-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Additional retrospective testing of the gum leaf skeletoniser (Uraba lugens) biological control agent Cotesia urabae was conducted against the endemic moth Celama parvitis. Although this native was included in host specificity testing before EPA approved the parasitoid's release, this work aimed to increase the sample size to better assess the potential risk posed. The effect that different periods of host deprivation and prior oviposition experience had on the parasitoid's readiness to attack, was examined in a sequence of no-choice tests. No parasitoids emerged from the 52% of larvae that survived to pupation, thus, confirming C. parvitis as a non-host. Dissections of larvae that died during laboratory rearing revealed that 63% had contained a parasitoid, but no C. urabae parasitoid larvae developed beyond the second instar. Significant differences were found in the attack times according to the parasitoid's deprivation levels (age), and it was also observed that the duration until first attack significantly decreased after each non-target presentation.

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  • Clinical ICT Tools: Are we able to measure their effectiveness? A Case Study

    Ewens, Andrew; Orr, M; Starr Jr, RG (2014-09-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Mid-term results after phaco-canaloplasty and canaloplasty

    Hurtikova, KH; Traine, PT; Loertscher, Martin; Mueller, MM (2015-06-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Preclinical rationale for the ongoing Phase 2 study of the hypoxia-activated EGFR-TKI tarloxotinib bromide (TH-4000) in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) or skin (SCCS).

    Jackson, V; Silva, S; Abbattista, Maria; Guise, Christopher; Bull, Matthew; Ashoorzadeh, Amir; Hart, C; Pearce, T; Smaill, Jeffrey; Patterson, Adam (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Progress Testing: Two Countries Divided by a Common Language

    O'Connor, Barbara; Lillis, Steven; Weston, Kimberley; Freeman, A; Bagg, Warwick (2014)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Elaborations on a theory of human problem solving

    Langley, Patrick; Trivedi, N (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this paper, we present an extended account of human problem solving and describe its implementation within ICARUS, a theory of the cognitive architecture. We begin by reviewing the standard theory of problem solving, along with how previous versions of ICARUS have incorporated and expanded on it. Next we propose four additional elaborations that bring the framework into closer alignment with human problem-solving abilities. After this, we report results on a number of domains that demonstrate the benefits of these extensions. In closing, we discuss related work and note promising directions for additional research.

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  • Pride and Prejudice: Social Workers’ Experiences of the Profession

    Staniforth, Barbara; Beddoe, L (2016-06-28)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Are doctoral theses changing over time?

    Brailsford, Ian; Sowden, Elizabeth; Orioli Figueira, Brigida (2016-04-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This poster presents longitudinal data on the length and chapter composition of 800 doctoral theses deposited at the University of Auckland between 2008 and 2015. Over this period, the doctoral statute has been amended to allow for more flexibility in the format of a thesis submitted for examination, such as the inclusion of creative practice and peer-reviewed publications. In addition, the funding mechanisms for doctorates in New Zealand have put a premium on candidates completing in a timely fashion. Given these two contexts we speculated that the length of an average doctoral thesis would be declining over time. One hundred doctoral theses – overwhelmingly PhD theses with a smattering of name doctorates –deposited in the University Library from each calendar year were randomly selected to assess: the number of pages; chapter composition; and inclusion of published papers within the thesis. These data were then correlated against academic faculty to tease out variations across the disciplines. Overall, our findings indicate that the doctoral thesis has remained relatively stable in length and chapter structure.

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