231 results for 2000, Conference poster

  • CUTE: CUTting Edge Diamond Optimization

    Downward, Anthony; Zakeri, G (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Centenary Diamond, weighing 55g, was estimated to be worth $100 million when it was unveiled in 1991. This diamond was cut from a rough-stone weighing 120g; thus when cutting such a stone, it is imperative to orient the stone such that waste is minimized. Our interactive software allows a user to maximize the value of a diamond from a given rough-stone. As the user alters the orientation of the diamond, it solves optimization problems to scale and position the diamond within the rough-stone.

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  • Impact of PCV7 on antibiotic susceptibiity of nasophayngeal Streptococcus pneumoniae in South Auckland children

    Sekikawa, E; Trenholme, A; Taylor, S; Lennon, Diana; McBride, C; Best, Emma (2011-03-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • New sugar agents for the control of undesirable microbes in the food industry

    Oliveira, Maria; Justino, J; Neves, A; Rauter, AP (2007-11-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • What drives bacterial community structure in stream biofilms?

    Roberts, Kelly; Lear, Gavin; Turner, Susan; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    BACKGROUND The microorganisms within biofilms are the key basal trophic level within most freshwater systems. However, microbial structure, function and succession in natural stream systems remain poorly understood. This research characterises the biofilm community structure of stream biofilms experiencing different anthropogenic impacts and how they change over time. Our aim is describe the changes in bacterial biofilm communities over time and to investigate what drives these changes.

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  • Who are Today's Dads?

    Underwood, Lisa; Atatoa Carr, P; Berry, S; Grant, Cameron; Morton, Susan (2015-12-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cardiac response to weak electrical shocks challenges the functional syncytium paradigm

    Caldwell, Bryan; Trew, Mark; Pertsov, AM (2015-04-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Annotation of Clinical Datasets Using openEHR Archetypes

    Zivaljevic, Aleksandar; Atalag, Koray; de Bono, B; Hunter, Peter (2015-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Wind power in New Zealand Renewable energy resource dynamics in a hydro-based power system

    Suomalainen, Anna-Kristiina; Pritchard, G; Sharp, Basil; Yuan, Z; Zakeri, G (2013-12-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Institutional Collaboration around Institutional Repositories

    Hayes, Leonie; Stevenson, Alison; Mason, Ingrid; Scott, Anne; Kennedy, Peter (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Three New Zealand universities have been collaborating on a project to provide open, web-based, access to research outputs through the creation of institutional repositories using the DSpace software. This poster will therefore address the theme of eResearch with particular focus on the benefits of active collaboration, intra-university, inter-university and international, in this area of activity. New Zealand has a small population of 4 million, an innovative and resourceful academic community, a newly implemented research funding model, based on performance (PBRF) and a readiness to stay competitive with the rest of the world. Institutional Repositories in New Zealand are in their infancy but a considerable body of experience already exists overseas which we can draw upon if we work in partnership with those institutions who have already implemented institutional repositories. Funding is limited but by sharing resources and working collaboratively each institution can make substantial progress towards the creation of individual repositories. This poster reports on the joint project between the University of Auckland, the University of Canterbury and Victoria University of Wellington. The three partners have been funded by the New Zealand Tertiary Education Commission to make available, via the Internet for access by Open Archives Initiative (OAI) compliant search engines, research outputs created by staff and students of the three partner institutions. This poster will present information on the work to: • Establish DSpace repositories in partner institutions that conform to the OAI-PMH standard. • Contribute to the development of linkages with the Australian DEST funded information infrastructure projects, i.e. ADT, APSR and ARROW projects. • Identify methods for increasing academic understanding of, and promoting contributions to, digital repositories the content of which is then available to enhance teaching and learning, as well as research. • Provide digital materials, either through the deposit of “born digital” material or through digitisation of material already available in print, that contribute to the developing digital content landscape as envisaged in the NZ Digital Strategy • Contribute to national research resource discovery service to be established by the National Library of New Zealand. Ensure that the content in the project repositories is visible for harvesting by global OAI-compliant search engines such as Google Scholar, OAIster, etc. Collaborate with other IR projects and communicate the lessons learned to the wider tertiary and research communities of New Zealand

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  • Effect of contact lens induced retinal defocus on the thickness of the human choroid

    Chiang, Samuel; Backhouse, S; Phillips, John (2014-04-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to describe the amplitude and time-course of choroidal thickness changes induced by imposed hyperopic and myopic retinal defocus and to compare the responses in emmetropic and myopic subjects. METHODS Twelve Asian subjects (6 emmetropes and 6 myopes) aged between 18 and 34 years had OCT images of the choroid taken in both eyes at 5 min intervals while exposed to monocular defocus (random right or left eye) for 60 min; the fellow eye was kept optimally corrected (no defocus). Two different monocular defocus conditions (2 D hyperopic or 2 D myopic defocus) were tested on separate occasions. Thickness changes were measured as absolute changes in microns. RESULTS Prior to applying defocus, mean choroidal thickness in myopic eyes (mean ± SD, 256.30µm ± 41.24µm) was significantly less than in emmetropic eyes (mean ± SD, 423.09µm ± 60.69µm) (p<0.05) in 60 minutes. No significant difference was found between emmetropes and myopes in changes of choroidal thickness with the two types of defocus. CONCLUSIONS Small but significant choroidal thickness changes occurred when human eyes were exposed to both myopic and hyperopic monocular defocus. In each case these changes acted to move the retina towards the altered image plane, so as to reduce the degree of defocus. In this small sample we could detect no difference in responses of myopic eyes compared to emmetropic eyes.

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  • Searching for anomalous light curves in massive data sets

    Rattenbury, Nicholas (2014-01-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The photometric surveys currently under way by the MOA and OGLE collaborations have produced and are extending databases of millions of stellar light curves. These databases have allowed investigations into diverse astrophysical fields including variable stars, proper motion studies and Galactic structure. Odd, or otherwise curious events have been discovered in the databases. We consider here one such event and propose methods for discovering more like it in the microlensing databases. A further aim of this initial work is to set out the prospects of the classification scheme for identifying time series that are maximally discordant - i.e. those that do not look like any other time series in the data set, and which therefore, may be of particular interest.

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  • The Effect of Glycosylation on the Potency of Pramlintide, An Anti-Diabetic Drug

    Fletcher, Madeleine; Kowalczyk, Renata; Fairbanks, A; Brimble, Margaret; Hay, DL (2013-12-18)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cell proliferative and radioprotective properties of bioactive Salvia sclareoides extracts

    Ruivo, D; Oliveira, Maria; Rauter, AP; Justino, J; Goulart, M (2008-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Characterisation of the Genetic and Hormone controls of Branching in Petunia

    Simons, Joanne; Templeton, K; Plummer, K; Beveridge, C; Snowden, K (2004-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Diagnostic Utility of a Next Generation Sequencing Retinal Panel in a Māori and Polynesian population with Inherited Retinal Disease

    Vincent, Andrea; Coysh, A; van Bysterveldt, K; Oliver, Verity; Black, G (2016-05-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Giving research global reach: ResearchSpace@Auckland

    Newton-Wade, Vanessa; Hayes, Leonie (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A key part of the academic research process is publishing the results – ‘getting it out there’. An institutional repository such as ResearchSpace@Auckland provides authors with a channel for near-instantaneous worldwide dissemination of research. ResearchSpace@Auckland at the University of Auckland was initially developed under the umbrella of the Institutional Repositories Aotearoa (Ira) Project. The project between Auckland, Canterbury and Victoria Universities used DSpace Open Source Software and was funded by the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC). The project was completed in 2007. ResearchSpace is now a full production system with seamless Disaster Recovery ability, which allows authors to submit their work confident that it will be secure. ResearchSpace contains ‘research outputs’ from the University of Auckland’s staff and students, including theses, papers and reports. From 2007 it is a requirement for all enrolling PhD students to submit a digital copy of their thesis upon completion. The PhD collection has grown from an initial 200 items at the beginning of 2007 to nearly 1700 items. 775 of these are open-access. This has been achieved via a retrospective digitization project for all PhD theses and a campaign to contact the authors for permission. Key features of ResearchSpace • Authors submit their own content initially (self-submission), administrators check content and publish it online • Most content is freely available to any user – use is not restricted to members of the institution or subscribers • Durable & Permanent URLs: we use ‘Handles’. e.g. http://hdl.handle.net/2292/1430. A handle does not have the institution’s domain name in the URL, if the website is changed or moved, the URL will still go to the correct location. • Preservation: creating digital files allows creation of a new print copy if necessary. Thesis files are in Portable Document Format (PDF), and the library has undertaken to keep the formats up to date, as technology may change in the future.

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  • Collaborative Problem Solving for Do-ers and Teachers of Mathematics

    Sheryn, Sarah; Frankcom, G; Ledger, G (2014-11-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study sought to explore and analyse the phenomenon of maths anxiety within a real-life context, and to identify if levels of maths anxiety can be reduced through participation in a reciprocal teaching process. This poster presents a small element of the larger study, which investigated how to reduce maths anxiety in teacher candidates. Maths anxiety is a well-researched phenomenon that is known to impede the successful mathematics teaching and learning experiences of some teacher candidates. The maths anxiety these students bring to their mathematics education courses results in poor quality mathematics teaching (Biddulph 1999; Frankcom 2006; Sloan 2010). Mathematics education lecturers have become increasingly aware of how some students become visibly anxious when they walk into the mathematics classroom, and/or are asked to collaborate to solve mathematical problems. These observations are supported by the level of maths anxiety reported by these students. The model developed for this study was informed by the work of Palinscar and Brown (1984) and complemented by problem-solving models from Mullis, et al. (2008), Reilly, Parsons and Bortolot (2009), and Polya (1945). The Revised Reciprocal Teaching Model (RRTM) was designed is to facilitate teacher candidates’ access to mathematical practices used in schools, and simultaneously develop their personal mathematical knowledge and understanding. Cognisant of the problem solving and peer mentoring literature, researchers provided opportunities for graduates to develop adaptive expertise. While peer mentoring is thoroughly established in literacy education it is under-researched within mathematics education. Reciprocal teaching falls within this area of research and provides a framework for individuals to mutually support each other while learning. The RRTM was developed to promote discourse within mathematical communities in an attempt to reduce maths anxiety. The implementation of the RRTM was through a two-phased structured framework, designed to take place over a university calendar year. The framework began with specific training of peer mentors who in turn worked with assigned mentees. The second phase promoted less reliance on the peer mentors and resulted in the students forming their own peer mentoring groups outside of class time. Results suggest that the model has a positive effect on students’ ability to confidently talk about and solve mathematical problems. This is evidenced by the decrease in maths anxiety levels self-reported by teacher candidates. This research indicates the RRTM has the potential to reduce maths anxiety levels of teacher candidates and produce confident do-ers and teachers of mathematics.

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  • High Pressure and Thermal Processing of kiwifruit puree: the effect on antioxidants and vitamin C

    Soloman, N; Oliveira, Maria (2011-11-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Talking Allowed!

    Davies, Maree; Sinclair, A (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Research on the Paideia Method (a method for discussing a topic) was conducted in 20 classrooms across five schools, of varying socioeconomic environments (ages 11-13) in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2010. The researchers sought to further examine the results from their pilot study of the Paideia Seminar, entitled 'Talking Allowed: I like it when the teacher lets us talk without telling us what to say', trialed in 2008 (Sinclair & Davies, 2011). In addition, in order to provide the optimum conditions to prepare the students for the face-to-face seminars, an online component (open source software) was added as an alternative medium to assist students in their preparation. The research questions were: What happens to the Nature of Interaction, and the Complexity of the Discussion when students participate in a Paideia Seminar, and an on-line discussion in preparation for the face-to-face seminar? What is the optimal role of the teacher when participating in a Paideia Seminar and an on-line discussion to increase complexity of discussion?

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  • Modelling NFAT Cycling Sensitivity in the Cardiac Myocyte

    Cooling, Michael; Hunter, Peter; Crampin, Edmund (2007-10-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The transcription factor NFAT acts as a signal integrator for a number of signal transduction pathways in cardiac myocytes that initiates gene expression in the disease Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy[1]. Here we develop a quantitative mathematical model of the cytoplasmicnuclear-cytoplasmic cycling of NFAT in response to calcium signals in the cardiac myocyte

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