231 results for 2000, Conference poster

  • Can we minimize androgen deprivation therapy-related quality of life effects in Māori & Pacific prostate cancer survivors using a genetic stratification?

    Karunasinghe, N; Zhu, Y; Han, Dug; Lange, K; Wang, A; Zhu, Shuotun; Masters, J; Goudie, M; Keogh, J; Benjamin, B; Holmes, M; Ferguson, Lynnette (2015-11-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    BACKGROUND: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is an effective palliation treatment for men with advanced prostate cancer (PC). This is a common treatment received by the majority of PC survivors among New Zealand (NZ) Maori men due to their late presentation of the disease. However, ADT have well documented side effects that could alter the patient’s quality of life (QoL). ADT involves suppression of androgens produced either by the testes or the adrenal gland or both. Adrenal androgen production involves conversion of androstenedione to testosterone by the aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) enzyme. We have previously reported that the AKR1C3 rs12529 G allele is associated with a lower prostate specific antigen (PSA) level, which is a downstream product of androgens binding to the androgen receptor. The AKR1C3 rs12529 G allele frequency is 14.2% higher among Māori, Pacific and East Asian men compared to Caucasians in our study cohort. Therefore, the current assessment is to evaluate whether genetic stratification with the AKR1C3 rs12529 polymorphism could support decision making on ADT to minimize QoL effects. METHODS: A patient cohort with confirmed clinical diagnoses of PC was recruited with written consent from 2006-2014 to Urology studies carried out at the Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, University of Auckland, NZ. Recruitment was carried out at hospitals managed under three District Health Boards of Auckland, and private Urology clinics from Waikato District, in NZ. From May 2013, patients were invited to complete a questionnaire that contained options for selecting PC treatment type/s received and a QoL survey. The primary outcomes were the percentage scores under each QoL subscale assessed using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaires (EORTC QLQ-C30 and PR25). Genotyping of these men for the AKR1C3 rs12529 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was carried out using the Sequenom MassArray and iPlex system or the Applied Biosystem’s Taqman SNP genotyping procedure. Age at diagnosis, Gleason score and alcohol consumption were confounding variables between ADT and no ADT groups, and were corrected for subsequent analysis. Analysis of QoL scores were carried out against ADT duration or in association with the AKR1C3 rs12529 SNP using the Generalised Linear Model. P-values <0.02]. This increase among the rs12529 GG genotype (9.7) is therefore, equivalent to 59% of the mean hormone treatment-related symptom score of 16.5 (SD16.6) recorded in this study. INTERPRETATION: As 85.3% ADT recipients have used AA the current study is best interpreted as QoL effects of AAs. This study suggests a possibility for those stratified with the AKR1C3 rs12529 G allele to receive intermittent AA treatment to minimize QoL effects. If larger prospective studies can confirm these findings, PC survivors particularly those of Maori and Pacific ethnic groups may greatly benefit through optimal ADT options not only for their survival benefits, but also to better maintain their QoL.

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  • Progress Testing: Two Countries Divided by a Common Language

    O'Connor, Barbara; Lillis, Steven; Weston, Kimberley; Freeman, A; Bagg, Warwick (2014)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Mid-term results after phaco-canaloplasty and canaloplasty

    Hurtikova, KH; Traine, PT; Loertscher, Martin; Mueller, MM (2015-06-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Elaborations on a theory of human problem solving

    Langley, Patrick; Trivedi, N (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this paper, we present an extended account of human problem solving and describe its implementation within ICARUS, a theory of the cognitive architecture. We begin by reviewing the standard theory of problem solving, along with how previous versions of ICARUS have incorporated and expanded on it. Next we propose four additional elaborations that bring the framework into closer alignment with human problem-solving abilities. After this, we report results on a number of domains that demonstrate the benefits of these extensions. In closing, we discuss related work and note promising directions for additional research.

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  • Preclinical rationale for the ongoing Phase 2 study of the hypoxia-activated EGFR-TKI tarloxotinib bromide (TH-4000) in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) or skin (SCCS).

    Jackson, V; Silva, S; Abbattista, Maria; Guise, Christopher; Bull, Matthew; Ashoorzadeh, Amir; Hart, C; Pearce, T; Smaill, Jeffrey; Patterson, Adam (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Are doctoral theses changing over time?

    Brailsford, Ian; Sowden, Elizabeth; Orioli Figueira, Brigida (2016-04-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This poster presents longitudinal data on the length and chapter composition of 800 doctoral theses deposited at the University of Auckland between 2008 and 2015. Over this period, the doctoral statute has been amended to allow for more flexibility in the format of a thesis submitted for examination, such as the inclusion of creative practice and peer-reviewed publications. In addition, the funding mechanisms for doctorates in New Zealand have put a premium on candidates completing in a timely fashion. Given these two contexts we speculated that the length of an average doctoral thesis would be declining over time. One hundred doctoral theses – overwhelmingly PhD theses with a smattering of name doctorates –deposited in the University Library from each calendar year were randomly selected to assess: the number of pages; chapter composition; and inclusion of published papers within the thesis. These data were then correlated against academic faculty to tease out variations across the disciplines. Overall, our findings indicate that the doctoral thesis has remained relatively stable in length and chapter structure.

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  • Clever Crosswalking - what do you take from one system to another?

    Zhao, Yanan; Shepherd, Kim; Hayes, Sharron; Schweer, A (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The poster looked at a metadata crosswalk implemented between a DSpace repository and a Research Management System (RMS) at the University of Auckland (UoA). The crosswalk facilitated the exposure of publication metadata from the internal RMS to the DSpace repository with the least amount of work and highest amount of accuracy.

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  • Sequence Coverage Abnormalities and Sex-Specific Autosomal Regions in Cattle

    Lopdell, Thomas; Harland, C; Johnson, T; Keehan, M (2012-08-21)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cortisol response to Synacthen stimulation is attenuated following abusive head trauma

    Heather, N; Derraik, J; Brennan, C; Hofman, Paul; Jefferies, C; Cutfield, W (2012-06-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • First born children have reduced insulin sensitivity, higher blood pressure and taller stature than later born children

    Savage, T; Ayyavoo, A; Mouat, F; Miles, H; Hofman, Paul; Cutfield, WS (2012-07-31)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Pride and Prejudice: Social Workers’ Experiences of the Profession

    Staniforth, Barbara; Beddoe, L (2016-06-28)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Coronary artery bifurcation haemodynamics - comparison between phase contrast MRI and computational fluid dynamics

    Beier, Susann; Ormiston, J; Webster, M; Cater, John; Medrano-Garcia, P; Young, Alistair; Cowan, Brett (2014-01-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Coronary atherosclerosis is common at vessel bifurcations. A quantitative approach to measuring blood velocity, vorticity and more complex flow features at bifurcations would enhance the understanding of the mechanisms of atheroma development, and potentially predict vessels at highest risk. The aim of this work was to validate 4D phase contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging flow measurements using a simplified arterial model of the left main coronary bifurcation against computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modelling.

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  • Who are Today's Dads?

    Underwood, Lisa; Atatoa Carr, P; Berry, S; Grant, Cameron; Morton, Susan (2015-12-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cardiac response to weak electrical shocks challenges the functional syncytium paradigm

    Caldwell, Bryan; Trew, Mark; Pertsov, AM (2015-04-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Annotation of Clinical Datasets Using openEHR Archetypes

    Zivaljevic, Aleksandar; Atalag, Koray; de Bono, B; Hunter, Peter (2015-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Purine nucleosides as new agents for the control of Alzheimer’s disease

    Oliveira, Maria; Marcelo, F; Justino, J; Jacob, AP; Bleriot, Y; Sinay, P; Goulart, M; Rauter, AP (2009-01-20)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Monitoring the health of New Zealand’s young people: A decade of surveillance research

    Clark, TC; Fleming, T; Bullen, P; Crengle, S; Denny, S; Dyson, B; Peiris John, R; Robinson, E; Rossen, F; Sheridan, J; Teevale, T; Utter, J; Fortune, S; Lewycka, S (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Over-expression of Human Amylin Leads to Oligomerization and beta-cell Dysfunction Associated with Mitochondrial Uncoupling, Activation of c-Jun and Decrease Expression of JNK Interacting Protein-1

    Zhang, Shaoping; Liu, H; Chuang, CL; Li, XL; Au, M; Zhang, L; Cooper, GJS (2012-06-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Over-expression of human amylin (hA) in pancreatic β-cells has been shown to contribute to cytotoxic hA aggregation and islet amyloid formation that can lead to β-cell dysfunction in type-2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to investigate the functional and molecular changes associated with hA oligomer formation and their relation to β-cell dysfunction and diabetes development using transgenic mouse model that over-expresses hA in their islet β-cells.We showed that both homozygous and hemizygous hA transgenic mice developed spontaneous diabetes with different elevated levels of hA and with different time frame of disease onset and death. Homozygous mice displayed hyperinsulinemia and self-limiting insulin resistance during the pre-diabetic state, whereas by contrast, hemizygous mice had a longer prediabetic phase without insulin resistance. Intracellular and extracellular oligomers were clearly detectable before onset of diabetes with strong correlation with the time of β-cell apoptosis occurred in homozygous but not in hemizygous mice, indicating a difference in the extent of cytotoxic oligomerization between these animals. In addition, RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated progressive decrease in β-cell expression of functional and key regulatory molecules such as insulin, amylin, Pdx1, MafA, Glut2 and GCK. We also detected changes in expression of the mitochondrial membrane protein UCP-2 which contributes to decreased mitochondrial function. Further molecular analysis demonstrated activation of c-Jun/JNK and decrease expression of JNK-interacting protein 1, suggesting their role in mediating beta-cell death/apoptosis. Our studies should lead to a better understanding of the role and regulation of hA-evoked β-cell dysfunction and β-cell death in diabetes

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  • Antifungal properties of sugar lactones

    Oliveira, Maria; Neves, A; Justino, J; Noronha, JP; Marcelo, F; Riccombeni, A; Rauter, AP (2005)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Purine Nucleosides as Cholinesterase Inhibitors

    Marcelo, F; Rauter, AP; Blériot, Y; Sinaÿ, P; Oliveira, Maria; Goulart, M; Justino, J (2008-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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