5 results for 2000, Moving image

  • Context matters : women's experiences of depression and of seeking professional help : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

    Batten, Jodie Anne (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Most existing research on women and depression takes a realist approach that effectively silences the voices of women and limits our understandings of depression. By engaging with the stories of seven women, recruited from a provincial New Zealand area, this research privileges women's voices. Taking a discourse analytic approach, this research explores how women construct their experiences of depression and of seeking professional help. I take a micro discursive approach in identifying how the women utilise various discursive resources in constructing their accounts of both depression and of seeking professional help. In order to locate these discursive resources within the broader socio-cultural environment, I employ a macro discursive approach drawing on Foucauldian discourse analysis and Davies and Harré’s Positioning Theory. Participant’s accounts of their depressive experiences change over the course of their journeys. I explore how the women's accounts shift from a contextualised explanatory framework that locates their experiences of depression within the gendered context of their lives, to a medicalised explanatory framework as they enter the professional help arena. This research offers insights into how dominant discursive construction of the ‘good’ woman/mother dovetail with a biomedical explanation of depression and prevailing discursive constructions around anti-depressant medications. Working together, these discourses effectively silence women's voices, both pathologising and decontextualising women's depressive experiences. Furthermore, I suggest that these dominant discursive resources and practices offer limited ways for women to make sense of their experiences in meaningful and empowering ways. A need for new understandings about women and depression is called for - one grounded in the material-discursive realities of women’s gendered lives.

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  • The effects of social isolation on cognition : social loneliness reduces cognitive performance in older adults : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirement for the degree of Master of Science in Psychology at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Whitehouse, Catherine (2013)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The present cross-sectional study examined the influence of social isolation on cognitive performance among older adults aged 65-84 years old. This study extended previous work on social isolation and cognition in two ways. While previous research has found a link between social isolation and cognition, few have examined the relationship between different forms of social isolation and different domains of cognition simultaneously. Secondly, a link between social loneliness and cognition has not been examined. Therefore, the current study examined the impact of four different types of social isolation (social loneliness, emotional loneliness, perceived social support and objective social isolation) on global cognition and cognitive domains (memory, fluency, language and visuospatial ability). The cross-sectional data from the New Zealand Longitudinal Study of Ageing (NZLSA) (2010) was used for analysis. The NZLSA study included questions about demographic information, mental and physical well-being, loneliness, social support, social networks and cognition. Using multiple regression analyses the influence of social isolation on cognitive functions was investigated. Results showed that various forms of social isolation may be differentially important for cognitive performance in the older adult, with social loneliness the only measure of social isolation that influences cognition. The results also suggested that if a form of social isolation affects cognition, the different cognitive domains such as global cognition, fluency, language and visuospatial ability respond in a similar pattern. Explanations of why social loneliness influences cognition is discussed. Limitations of the study and implications for future research, such as the need for a longitudinal study that simultaneously assesses the links between the various forms of social isolation and cognition, is also discussed.

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  • Synchresis: Exploring gestural relationships between musical-sound and visual-gesture on film: Synchresis as a unifying concept for exploring and creating effective multimedia relationships

    Clarke, Justin (2014)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This investigation looks at the nature of synchresis in filmic contexts, with a particular focus on film-dance. I have discussed language that can be useful in this exploration, and have attempted to define terms in order to better develop a means of conceptualizing what synchresis is, and how it functions in establishing and shaping connections between media. This theoretical work is the background for my investigation of synchresis in the three contrasting works that make up my creative portfolio. A better understanding of the complexity of synchresis in cross-media interactions provides a useful tool to unify and shape these interactions. The marriage of movement and sound is a central part of human experience and our experiences of music are potently transformed through visual gesture. Likewise film is transformed by music’s vitality and meaning‐shaping role. In other words, synchresis emerges from the primary experience of intermodality. An enhanced understanding of it provides a platform for possible further explorations of the different ways in which different media can be combined. It is hoped that composers might be able to usefully apply ideas from this investigation to intermedia works of their own.

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  • Videos relating to Fluorescent Function-Spacer-Lipid construct labeling allows for real-time in vivo imaging of cell migration and behaviour in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Lan, C-C; Blake, D; Henry, S; Love, D (2012-03-12)

    Moving image
    Auckland University of Technology

    Video descriptions: Video 1: 2 hours post injection imaging of the caudal vein plexus area of 52 hpf recipient zebrafish receiving 0.2 mg/ml FSL-FLRO4-I transformed WKM cells. In the video, a large slow-moving cell tumbles along the endothelial surface. Elongated oval shaped erythrocytes move at a fast speed. Video 2: Embryos (50-52hpf) were injected with 0.125 mg/ml FSL-FLRO4-II-treated cells. Window one focused on the eye region. Video 3: Embryos (50-52hpf) were injected with 0.125 mg/ml FSL-FLRO4-II-treated cells. Window two focused on the heart region. Video 4: Embryos (50-52hpf) were injected with 0.125 mg/ml FSL-FLRO4-II-treated cells. Window three focused on the first half the yolk extension region. Video 5: Embryos (50-52hpf) were injected with 0.125 mg/ml FSL-FLRO4-II-treated cells. Window four focused on the caudal half of the yolk extension and the anal regions. Video 6: Embryos (50-52hpf) were injected with 0.125 mg/ml FSL-FLRO4-II-treated cells. Window five focused on the caudal haematopoietic tissue region. Video 7: Embryos (50-52hpf) were injected with 0.125 mg/ml FSL-FLRO4-II-treated cells. Window six focused on the tail region. Video 8: Temporal assessment of FSL-FLRO4-II labeled cells in the lower trunk area. The image was taken 2 hours post injection for the sham-injected fish. Video 9: Temporal assessment of FSL-FLRO4-II labeled cells in the lower trunk area. The image was taken 2 hours post injection for the fish transplanted with FSL-FLRO4-II treated cells. Video 10: Temporal assessment of FSL-FLRO4-II labeled cells in the lower trunk area. The image was taken 19 hours post injection for the sham-injected fish. Video 11: Temporal assessment of FSL-FLRO4-II labeled cells in the lower trunk area. The image was taken 19 hours post injection for the fish transplanted with FSL-FLRO4-II treated cells. Video 12: Temporal assessment of FSL-FLRO4-II labeled cells in the lower trunk area. The image was taken 43 hours post injection for the sham-injected fish. Video 13: Temporal assessment of FSL-FLRO4-II labeled cells in the lower trunk area. The image was taken 43 hours post injection for the fish transplanted with FSL-FLRO4-II treated cells.

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  • T2 weighted imaging of the bovine eye and 3D reconstruction of the ocular lens’ sutures using tractography

    Vaghefi, Ehsan (2010)

    Moving image
    The University of Auckland Library

    Restricted Item. Print thesis available in the University of Auckland Library or may be available through Interlibrary Loan. Streaming video available. Video supports the PhD thesis "Computational modeling and magnetic resonance imaging of microcirculation in the ocular lens" Thesis (PhD--Bioengineering)--University of Auckland, 2010. T2 weighted imaging of the bovine eye: https://mediastore.auckland.ac.nz/library/public/2010/MRI-cut.preview 3D reconstruction of the ocular lens’ sutures using tractography: https://mediastore.auckland.ac.nz/library/public/2010/sutures.preview TITLE: T2 weighted imaging of the bovine eye. The adaptation of MRI protocols for the ocular tissue was required to achieve a range of high contrast MRI results from this organ. Among various protocols available, the 3D gradient echo protocol was thought to be the most suitable. During this experiment, it was revealed that the ocular T2 properties vary throughout the eye and especially the ocular lens stood out from the rest of the ocular tissue. Using 3D surface rendering techniques and taking advantage of high contrast and high resolution data from the ocular lens, some iso-surfaces corresponding to different T2 relaxation times were rendered and visualized. It is believed that the concentric volumes detected in the lens were corresponding to its varying water-protein ratio from periphery towards the core of the lens. TITLE: 3D reconstruction of the ocular lens’ sutures using tractography. Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) was performed on the bovine ocular lens and it was noticed that the sutures structure of the lens was not distinguishable on images with no diffusion weighting. This was thought to be because of the close water content of the suture structure to its neighbouring fiber cells, leading to a smooth refractive index in the lens. However the sutures structure was evident in the diffusion weighted images, leading to the conclusion that the water mobility in these clefts is higher than that in the neighbouring cells. Using DTI data, eigenvectors were calculated in the 3D space. Streamlines were created in the sutures structure region by tracing the calculated eigenvectors. This 3D rendered structure showed the rotation and penetration of the sutures, from the polar regions towards the core of the lens. From the posterior pole to the anterior pole of the lens, the sutures seemed to rotate close to 60º which is very close to the findings of the literature. This work was encouraging for the future development of DTI technique as a non-invasive imaging method to study structural properties of the ocular lens.

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