1,191 results for Auckland University of Technology, Conference item

  • Aging just is: Illuminating its that-being, how-being & what-being

    Wright St Clair, V (2011-10-14)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Duplicate of http://aut.researchgateway.ac.nz/handle/10292/2285

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  • What constitutes good practice in teaching academic literacies?

    Kirkness, A (2011-08-26)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    In the multicultural student body at English-medium tertiary institutions today, teachers find that they can no longer make assumptions about student preparedness for tertiary learning. Many students do not have the academic literacy skills in English to enable them to learn effectively Thus the teaching of these skills needs to be included in discipline programmes. But who is to teach them, subject teachers or language teachers? If subject teachers, then how can they be given the additional support they need to promote language development in their teaching? If language teachers, then how can they ensure that they teach the literacy skills that the particular subject requires? This paper focuses on the various models used at the Auckland University of Technology to cater for the English language needs of students in different faculties. It discusses structures and processes that support the teaching of academic literacy skills as central to developing students’ ability to master their discipline. It presents models of language teachers delivering courses in academic literacy skills alongside the subject classes (adjunct course) and of subject teachers including academic literacy skills in mainstream programmes (integrated course). It identifies examples of good practice and formal and informal academic development events that arise in the design of courses with a dual focus on discipline content and language.

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  • Spatiotemporal Environments – Narratives of the underpaid worker in New Zealand

    Sinfield, D (2011-12-07)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    The International Conference on Interdisciplinary Social Sciences examines the nature of disciplinary practices, and the interdisciplinary practices that arise in the context of ‘real world’ applications. It also interrogates what constitutes ‘science’ in a social context, and the connections between the social and other sciences. In this project and conference presentation it moves concerns with narratives of underpaid work into spatiotemporal environments. Audio recordings of worker’s stories are fused with typographical treatments and imagery to produce a series of short films. The advantage of this approach is that these texts are more widely available and operate outside of the cultural exclusivity of the art gallery and the graphic design field. This is an international conference that has been running for 6 years which is organised by Common Ground Publishing. Each year this conference is held in various countries throughout the world and this year it will be held in New Orleans, USA. Speakers are also invited to publish their journal article (which is peer reviewed) with the publication associated with this conference.

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  • FULSOME: fuzzy logic for software metric practitioners and researchers

    MacDonell, SG; Gray, AR; Calvert, JM (2011-09-03)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    There has been increasing interest in recent times for using fuzzy logic techniques to represent software metric models, especially those predicting the software development effort. The use of fuzzy logic for this application area offers several advantages when compared to other commonly-used techniques. These include the use of a single model with different levels of precision for the inputs and outputs used throughout the development life-cycle, the possibility of model development with little or no data, and its effectiveness when used as a communication tool. The use of fuzzy logic in any applied field, however, requires that suitable tools are available for both practitioners and researchers-satisfying both interface- and functionality-related requirements. After outlining some of the specific needs of the software metrics community, including results from a survey of software developers on this topic, this paper describes the use of a set of tools called FULSOME (FUzzy Logic for SOftware MEtrics). The development of a simple fuzzy logic system by a software metrician and its subsequent tuning are then discussed using a real-world set of software metric data. The automatically generated fuzzy model performs acceptably when compared to regression-based models

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  • Deferred gratification', 'Wildcards' and 'Packaging': innovative teaching strategies for first year product design students

    Withell, AJ; Charlton, NB (2011-08-16)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper describes a strategic approach to teaching design that addresses the difficulties of building and maintaining motivation and engagement in first year product/industrial design students, and creating the learning context in which they can come to terms with the ‘idea’ of the design process. The paper critically considers the observations and experiences of the authors during the co-delivery of the first-year studio course of the Bachelor of Product Design at Unitec, New Zealand. The success of the strategy is illustrated with reference to improving student work and learning outcomes. Student perceptions are used to help interpret these practical examples of learning, with reference to broader educational approaches. Product/industrial design students require a variety of approaches and teaching interventions that are particular to their interests, concerns and perceptions of self. Innovative strategies are required to ensure that a meaningful engagement with design process is achieved. The challenge for first year studio lecturers is to devise teaching methods that make palatable the need to accept ‘deferred gratification’ in terms of hard design outcomes, via a rich and engaging, but fundamental learning process. A number of teaching methods are presented that engage the principles of experiential and situational learning and that introduce students to a number of practical skills and conceptual insights. The delivery and structure of the studio programme is further underpinned by reflective learning practices and the creation of an environment conductive to an effective community of learning/practice. Through this approach, students are asked to consider the immediate value of learning self-awareness, and to see ‘learning’ as an important long term professional competency. Given New Zealand’s particular limitations regarding large scale manufacturing, the emphasis on independent but collaborative, transferable thinking skills is particularly important. The process is in this case far more significant as a learning outcome, as it equips students to be involved in a wide range of design related fields, but as a ‘non-tangible’ outcome is considerably more difficult to teach to students with a hands-on orientation.

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  • Curved layer fused deposition modeling in conductive polymer additive manufacturing

    Diegel, O; Singamneni, S; Huang, B; Gibson, I (2011-08-18)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper describes a curved-layer additive manufacturing technology that has the potential to print plastic components with integral conductive polymer electronic circuits. Researchers at AUT University in New Zealand and the National University of Singapore have developed a novel Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process in which the layers of material that make up the part are deposited as curved layers instead of the conventional flat layers. This technology opens up possibilities of building curved plastic parts that have conductive electronic tracks and components printed as an integral part of the plastic component, thereby eliminating printed circuit boards and wiring. It is not possible to do this with existing flat-layer additive manufacturing technologies as the continuity of a circuit could be interrupted between the layers. With curved-layer fused deposition modeling (CLFDM) this problem is removed as continuous filaments in 3 dimensions can be produced, allowing for continuous conductive circuits.

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  • Did the earth move for you too? Understanding post-earthquake changes in retail shopping behaviour

    Ballentine, P; Parsons, AG; Zafar, S (2013-12-12)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Christchurch, the second largest city in New Zealand, was rattled by three major earthquakes in a span of six months from September 2010. With significant loss of life, collapsed buildings and damaged infrastructure, consumers were confronted with the notion that retail spaces, in the event of an earthquake, had the potential to be unsafe and a source of possible personal harm. This paper presents the results of a qualitative study that explored how consumers modified their retail shopping behaviour following a sequence of earthquake events over the 2010/2011 timeframe in Christchurch, New Zealand.

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  • What determines the location of equity trading? Evidence from stocks cross-listed in various markets

    Dodd, O (2011-12-12)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    We analyse the distribution of foreign trading volume of European stocks cross-listed on various stock exchanges and examine the factors that affect the distribution. We focus on the role of two sets of determinants: the stock exchange characteristics and the stock-specific factors. We find that a stock exchange’s ability to attract order flow of foreign equity is positively associated with its organizational efficiency, market liquidity, the regulations pertinent to the quality of investor protection and insider trading. Regulated stock exchanges are found to be more successful in attracting order flow of foreign stocks than non-regulated markets, such as OTC and alternative markets and trading platforms. Among the stock-level factors, the share of trading on a foreign exchange is higher for companies that are smaller, riskier and have low return correlation with the host market returns. It is also evident that the share of foreign trading volume of stock is higher when the currencies of host and home markets are the same and the share increases with the duration of a listing.

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  • Internet use and well-being of young adults

    Techatassanasoontorn, A; Thaiprasert, N (2013-11-28)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Internet has significantly transformed how, when and where people conduct their everyday life activities. This study examines the relationship between Internet use and well-being. We ask: how do Internet use and the quality of Internet and non-Internet experiences influence well-being? Drawing on the subjective well-being literature in economics and psychology as well as empirical research on Internet use and impacts, we evaluate the influence of domain life satisfaction and affective experiences associated with Internet and non-Internet activities on life satisfaction. Young adults in Thailand are the empirical focus of this study. The results suggest that satisfaction with family is important to their life satisfaction. Positive affect from Internet activities is important to a satisfying life of young adults. They appear to value positive affect from Internet activities more than positive affect from non-Internet activities. On the other hand, negative affect from both Internet and non-Internet activities decreases life satisfaction.

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  • Coopetition and Knowledge Transfer Dynamics: New Zealand’s Regional Tourism Organisations and the 2011 Rugby World Cup

    Werner, K; Dickson, G; Hyde, K (2013-11-26)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    To ensure the success of Rugby World Cup 2011 (RWC 2011) in New Zealand regional tourism organisations were expected to collaborate with each other as part of developing a nationwide approach to the event, whilst simultaneously competing with each other for visitor nights and spending. Simultaneous cooperation and competition is known as coopetition. Relatively little is known about the impact of coopetition on knowledge transfer dynamics. The study analyses how coopetition between regional tourism organisations (RTOs) impacted their knowledge transfer dynamics in the context of RWC 2011. The study utilised an exploratory, comparative, qualitative, case study approach. Twenty-one semi-structured interviews with CEOs and senior managers from RTOs were conducted both pre-event and post-event. A formal survey and a documentation review provided complementary data. The findings indicate that the level of collaboration among RTOs fell short of the collaborative approach advocated by government and event organisers. It was also evident that a continuum of competition and collaboration (i.e. coopetition) was present in the RTO network for RWC 2011. This continuum mirrored normal everyday RTO behaviour with its focus on regional issues. Overall, the knowledge acquisition and transfer processes among the RTOs were negatively affected in two ways: (1) the limited RTO collaboration did not facilitate an effective knowledge transfer process; and (2) RTO competition constrained knowledge sharing. These factors restricted the flow of potentially useful knowledge and information around mega-events. The structure and set-up of RWC 2011 — especially the regional bidding process to host teams and matches — was crucial. This bidding process impeded inter-regional collaboration and knowledge transfer whilst simultaneously facilitating competition among the RTOs. The study concludes that coopetition can negatively affect the sharing and transfer of knowledge in a destination marketing and mega-events environment. The research addresses the call for further research in this field and enhances understanding of how to better leverage mega-events in the future.

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  • Climate change effects on Sri Lankan paddy yield: an initial investigation using Data Mining algorithms

    Shanmuganathan, S (2013-12-09)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    In recent times, climate change (CC) and its effects on key crops, such as rice, wheat and maize, have drawn significant research interest alongside population increase, economic growth and changing diet patterns, all of them considered as the driving forces influencing earth’s food and water ecosystems. Despite recent technological advances, such as from improved plant breeds (cultiva or varieties) to irrigation systems, which have contributed towards improving the world’s staple food production significantly, climate still remains as the key factor in agricultural productivity. Hence, understanding the effects of climate change on various staple food crops has become the utmost priority in many aspects especially, to overcome the threats to the world food security. As a result of this, many institutions concerned over related issues and research communities, in recent years, have turned their focus into modelling the phenomenon at various scales and levels. Contemporary research on modelling the climate change patterns in weather conditions and their effects is summarised. Existing crop forecasting models vary significantly in spatiotemporal scales and levels, the lowest being at the micro (e.g. the field or farm at specific days/weeks), and the highest at macro (e.g. regional /district, at months/years) or global, the crops being studied include, staple crops (maize, rice and wheat) and vineyards all using an array of variables characterised by 1) historic (using a multitude of sources, e.g. metrological, phenological, satellite imagery and wireless sensors at the micro scale, or 2) simulated data (www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/ncdc.html), both against observed yield In this context, the paper presents an initial investigation in which four data mining algorithms are explored to analyse the rice crop data in Sri Lankan administrative divisions, as an example study. Rice is the main staple food for Sri Lankans and paddy cultivation in the country dates back to as early as 800 BC. Presently, paddy is being cultivated as a wetland crop, either rain fed or irrigated. Lately, the country’s estimated total land under cultivation is said to be approximately 708,000 Hectares cultivated in two seasons “Maha” and “Yala”, that correspond to the country’s two monsoons, North-east monsoon (from September to following March) South-west (from May to end of August). Paddy yield in various Sri Lankan divisions is presented in figure 1 based on 2008 average annual production obtained from www.statistics.gov.lk The results of this investigation reveal interesting correlations between recent climate and paddy yield in nine regional divisions of Sri Lanka over “Yala” paddy season despite the gaps in the climate data that cannot be analysed using geostatistical or conventional methods due to the gaps in the data. Keywords: Soil nutrient, grapevine, geostatistical analysis

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  • Operationalising gamification in an educational authentic environment

    Reiners, T; Wood, LC; Chang, V; Guetl, C; Herrington, J; Teräs, H; Gregory, S (2013-12-11)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper addresses the inauthentic pedagogical approaches in current classroom and distance-learning environments, and will propose a methodology that utilises existing technologies to provide an immersive and authentic experience in education; i.e. to bridge the gap between the academic perspective and the real-world requirements. Industry postulate that recent graduates lack requisite skills, are often ignorant of the workings of company cultures, and are uncertain how to transfer their university-acquired theoretical knowledge to effective practice. We propose an environment that increases authenticity through inclusion of real-life complexity modelled in an immersive scenario, links scenarios into a comprehensive supply chain that supports exchange of information and repercussions/effects from actions between modules, and includes gaming mechanisms to increase student engagement further. Especially the gaming mechanisms are required to encourage student engagement in (and better manage their interaction/learning process with in a step-wise fashion, rather than ‘throwing them in the deep end’), reflection on, and learning from, the flow-on effects of an interlinked immersive, authentic, virtual, awesome, environment; otherwise, the complexity of the interlinked simulation would be too great to ensure effective learning!

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  • Pixel clustering in spatial data mining; an example study with Kumeu wine region in New Zealand

    Shanmuganathan, S (2013-12-09)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper describes an approach to pixel clustering using self-organising map (SOM) techniques in order to identify environmental factors that influence grape quality. The study area is the Kumeu grape wine region of northern New Zealand (NZ). SOM methods first introduced by Kohonen in the late 1980s, are based on two layered feed forward artificial neural networks (ANNs) with an unsupervised training algorithm. They are useful in projecting multidimensional input data onto low dimensional displays while preserving the intrinsic properties in the raw data by which the detection of previously unknown knowledge in the form of patterns, structures and relationships is enhanced. In modern day viticultural zoning approaches, factors that contribute to grape quality are typically categorised into three classes; terrior (climate, soil type, topography of a location), cultiva (the variety of the vine) and dependent factors such as berry quality indicators (e.g.: Brix and pH) and wine quality/market price. Many modern viticulturists rely on expert knowledge and intuition to establish viticultural zones in conjunction with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to further subdivide a wine region and vineyards into zones. The most common scale for such zoning has been the “meso” scale and the factors used for the characterisation of vineyards, varies extensively. The most adopted factors used for zoning are grapevine growth phenology (growing degree days (GDD), frost days/timing, berry ripening temperature range) for which comprehensive knowledge on local viticulture and wine quality is essential. Hence, for characterising vineyards from the new world or wine regions with insufficient knowledge for zoning is considered as a challenging task. For such instances, the SOM approach discussed in this paper provides a means to resolving a lack of extensive historical knowledge especially, when establishing zoning systems. The case study presented demonstrates the advantages of the SOM approach to identifying the ideal discerning attributes for zoning between and within vineyard/s using available geocoded digital data. The results of the SOM based clustering and data mining approach show that water deficit, elevation (along with hill shade and aspect) and annual average/minimum temperatures, are the main contributory factors for zoning vineyards in the Kumeu wine region at the meso scale. Interestingly, the elevation, annual average- and minimum- temperatures, induration, drainage and monthly water ratio balance are found to be the discerning factors at the macro conforming some of the currently used factors in NZ.  Cluster  pixel count  Elevation  Ave Temp  A  min Temp  A sol Radiation Induratin  Exch Cation Acid sol P  Che limitaton Age Slope Drainage Wat  BR  Water deficit  1a&c  177191  128.59 12.04  1.57  14.92 3.11 1.97 3.79 1.00 1.87 0.06  4.34  1.62 219.95 1b  93607  62.37 11.62  1.09  14.07 3.31 2.01 3.86 1.00 1.16 0.03  4.88  1.70 208.26 2a  127694  36.85 13.35  3.20  14.72 1.23 2.21 2.46 1.07 1.37 0.04  3.28  1.76 179.55 2b  39396  93.84 13.74  4.59  14.89 2.28 1.42 1.62 0.94 1.71 0.06  3.74  2.67 54.10 Total  437888  Figure 1b: SOM cluster profiles, WatBR: monthly water balance ratio.

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  • Learning and teaching strategies in an intercultural context: offshore programme in Vietnam

    Thorpe, SJ; Wu-Ross, A (2013-12-13)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    The number of New Zealand higher education institutions collaborative programmes in Asian countries is increasing. Students enrolled in offshore programmes have developed a range of learning strategies that meet the needs of their home learning environment. However those same learning strategies may not match the needs of their foreign education provider. Further to this, offshore students may not be familiar with the foreign lecturers’ teaching approaches. The rapid internationalization of universities in countries such as New Zealand, and the adoption of the teaching of foreign degrees in countries such as Vietnam and China, makes it evident that a better understanding of offshore students’ academic needs, expectations and study habits will enhance the students’ learning experiences. Understanding the lecturer’s role in adapting teaching and learning in offshore delivery is also a useful lens to apply. In this paper, we document the learning and teaching strategies adopted by the students in Vietnam and lecturers from a university in New Zealand to overcome the issues identified by the students themselves. The paper proposes cultural awareness and intercultural competence as vital requirements for academics who are involved in course planning, operations, and management, as well as subject and paper development and delivery offshore.

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  • Applications of an unsupervised neural network to support sustainable development by modelling environmental, social and economic conditions

    Shanmuganathan, S (2014-03-27)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    In this paper, initially the circumstances that led to a need for ecologically sustainable development and the progress achieved in this regard are briefly looked at. Thereafter, applications of an unsupervised algorithmic neural network to aid sustainable development by modelling environmental, social and economic conditions of complex natural habitats using measurable variable data are reviewed

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  • Impact of salesperson information overload on relationship selling behaviors and sales performance: a conceptual framework

    Han, D; Herjanto, H; Gaur, S

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Although salesperson information overload is considered to be one of the most important barrier to salesperson performance and a fruitful and healthy buyer-seller relationship formation; surprisingly, it has received minimum scholarly attention. A better understanding of how salesperson information overload impacts selling behaviour and sales performance could help salespersons as well as business organisations to correctly gather, select and use information to strengthen their selling activities. This study, therefore, intends to offer an in-depth understanding of this important issue and fills an important gap in the literature. Our conceptual model shows that salesperson information overload negatively affects both customer-oriented selling behaviour and relational selling behaviour which in turn reduces sales performance. In addition, the model shows that information overload can moderate the relationship between adaptive selling behaviour and customer-oriented selling behaviour as well as the association between adaptive selling behaviour and relational selling behaviour. Finally, our model also suggests that salesperson information overload negatively moderates the link between customer-oriented selling behaviour and sales performance and the relationship between relational selling behaviour and sales performance.

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  • Attenuation of ocean waves due to random perturbations in the seabed profile

    Chung, H

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    We employ linear wave theory to study long range attenuation of ocean waves caused by small, random perturbations in the seabed. The phenomenon in an example of localization in random media. A multiple-scale method is used, in which the solution is expanded over a local scale, on the order of the perturbations, and an observation scale. However, it is not clear how the properties of the random seabed profile, such as probability density, autocorrelation and spectral density, affect the expansion directly or indirectly. We will discuss how the solutions can be obtained numerically so that the effects of each instance of random seabed on the solution can be studied.

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  • Fusing stage and screen in search of empathy

    Brannigan, R (2014-01-29)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Fusing Stage and Screen in Search of Empathy Ross Brannigan Faculty of Design & Creative Technologies, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand The liminal, intermedial space where cinema and theatre come together is still comparatively new territory. This paper specifically explores that space where performance exists, not wholly as stage or screen, for its potential to enhance empathy. The new space affords opportunity to interweave visual aspects – both pre-recorded and of the live performance and to build new practice-centred understanding of how to negotiate the combination of processes involved. An experimental performance was devised to explore the possibilities of combining the cinematically visual and the live. A somewhat constrained version of this is presented here, not just as illustration but as a means of discourse. A heuristic approach has been adopted to allow tacit knowledge to play a substantial role in the shaping of the enquiry. This performance as research exercise is offered as a provocation. It is the first of a series of explorations which will culminate in a full length work. Whether that work will be a piece of theatrical cinema, cinematic theatre or some new form evolving from the experimentation remains to be discovered. The results of the performance experiment indicate that, given the potential to harness the immediacy of theatre with the extreme visual intimacy of the close up, empathetic responses can be enhanced. It highlights also that there are caveats, obstacles and creative constraints to consider. The experiment suggests that the intermedial art form will evolve and that the body of experience and discourse within the community of practitioners and the audience will play a major role in that evolution. Practitioners stand at the threshold of new forms and the liminality of the space is an exciting opportunity to create new types of performance.

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  • i-SITEs and the implementation of authentic sustainable strategies: 100% pure rhetoric?

    Mowatt, S; Morrow, J (2014-01-28)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    For sustainable business strategies to be effective, they need to be authentic, and successfully implemented with active participation from management and staff throughout the organisation. This process has been under researched in the environmental and strategic management literature. The tourism industry provides an ideal context to examine this process when it is based on a ‘green’ image, as it relies on the ‘authentic’ imagery of and engagement with the natural environment to differentiate destinations and to create competitive advantage. As the outcomes of these strategies are dependent on the active participation and engagement of front-line staff, and are observable by consumers, poorly implemented strategies will not be authentic and can open organisations to allegations of ‘greenwash.’ This paper investigates the translation of the 100% Pure New Zealand branding campaign into authentic sustainability strategies, and the implementation process to embed these strategies. The study was undertaken using the qualitative research based on of multiple case studies, where information was gathered using semi structured interviews with the manager and front-line employees of four i-SITEs, as well an observation of the i-SITE buildings, where tourists interact with the 100% Pure brand. The results were examined using thematic analysis, where a number of themes emerged, including: sustainability, the definition, policies, practices and procedures, as well as an identification of barriers to implementation; the perceptions and relevance of third party accreditation, in particular the Qualmark Enviro Awards; an exploration of authenticity in a tourism industry context; the communication of sustainability top-down from council and ground-up, including with tourists; and an exploration to identify an understanding of imagery and concepts of 100% Pure campaign. Four concepts were identified for further discussion. First, the constraints and barriers to sustainability strategies: with reference to the council, the building, and a discourse between the participant’s home sustainability actions and work implementation. Second, how Tourism New Zealand translates the 100% Pure campaign into a strategic vision. Third, an exploration of the understanding and meaning of authenticity. Fourth, a discussion on implementing and embedding authentic sustainability strategies. The study makes contributions to theory, policy and practice. For the implementation of authentic strategies the study suggests that a whole organisation approach, that combines top-down and bottom-up approaches, is necessary to implement and embed successful sustainability strategies. These theoretical insights are elaborated from two perspectives: top-down and from bottom-up, resulting in two levels of policy implications. The top-down perspective focuses on how Tourism New Zealand and local councils can better communicate the strategic vision created using the 100% Pure brand, as well as suggestions for more effective dissemination of information and knowledge about sustainability, and related policy. The bottom-up perspective focuses on employee empowerment, to engage in the creation, implementation and review of sustainability strategy to enable authentic implementation and embeddedness. Specific recommendations are offered for management practice that there must be an involvement and commitment of time and resources, not just financial resources, by the management and staff at the i-SITEs, the local councils, as well as central government through Tourism New Zealand to more effectively embed authentic strategies throughout the organisations involved.

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  • Machinations in Fleet Street: Roy Thomson, Cecil King, and the creation of a magazine monopoly

    Mowatt, S; Cox, H (2014-01-28)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Britain’s newspaper and magazine publishing business did not fare particularly well during the 1950s. With leading newspaper proprietors placing their desire for political influence above that of financial performance, and with working practices in Fleet Street becoming virtually ungovernable, it was little surprise to find many leading periodical publishers on the verge of bankruptcy by the decade’s end. A singular exception to this general picture of financial mismanagement was provided by the chain of enterprises controlled by Roy Thomson. Having first established a base in Scotland in 1953 through the acquisition of the Scotsman newspaper publishing group, the Canadian entrepreneur brought a new commercial attitude and business strategy to bear on Britain’s publishing industry. Using profits generated by a string of successful media activities, in 1959 Thomson bought a place in Fleet Street through the acquisition of Lord Kemsey’s chain of newspapers, which included the prestigious Sunday Times. Early in 1961 Thomson came to an agreement with Christopher Chancellor, the recently appointed Chief Executive of Odhams Press, to merge their two publishing groups and thereby create a major new force in the British newspaper and magazine publishing industry. The deal was never consummated however. Within days of publicly announcing the merger, Odhams found its shareholders being seduced by an improved offer from Cecil King, Chairman of Daily Mirror Newspapers, Ltd., which they duly accepted. The Mirror’s acquisition of Odhams was deeply controversial, mainly because it brought under common ownership the two left-leaning British popular newspapers, the Mirror and the Herald. The current paper utilises archive sources from the Cabinet Office to explore the political dialogue that enabled the controversial takeover to proceed unopposed by the regulatory authority of the Monopolies Commission. In business terms, it analyses the implication of the successful prosecution of the deal for magazine publishing in Britain: the creation of a virtual monopoly through the formation of the Mirror-controlled IPC Magazines, and Thomson’s hostile response to this new enterprise spearheaded through his ownership of the Sunday Times.

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