89 results for Auckland University of Technology, Conference paper

  • Moodle as a virtual learning environment

    Petrova, K. (2010-04-12T20:55:35Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

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  • Global networking: problems and solutions in branching to electronic commerce

    Petrova, K. (2010-04-12T20:55:34Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

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  • Using IT for active student feedback in the learning environment

    Clear, Tony (2009-05-27T22:14:28Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper describes the use of a web-based groupware product (specifically a Lotus NotesTM & DominoTM discussion database), as a means of gaining direct and regular feedback from students on the progress of a course. Some of the pitfalls and issues are discussed, including motivation for use, barriers to effective feedback, the value of anonymity and appropriate netiquette. Some recommendations are made for others wishing to use such a feedback mechanism, and for those who do not have Lotus Notes installed, how a feedback system such as this might be implemented in some other web based product.

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  • A multi-discipline approach linking related disciplines and stakeholder communities to develop business expertise for the new technological environment

    Petrova, K.; Sinclair, R. (2010-04-12T20:55:33Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    Although teaching institutions are typically well behind business in adopting new technologies, an attempt is being made at the Auckland University of Technology to introduce a new field of study and a new technological environment for its delivery - a comprehensive programme in eBusiness studies. The university works very closely with its stakeholder communities particularly in identifying new programme needs to ensure a balance is achieved between technical skill and business focus. As a result of this collaboration an operational model comprising a total of eight modules was constructed with the aim of integrating the proposed eBusiness qualifications within the structure of an existing Bachelor of Business degree. This paper discusses the background and development of a module called "Electronic Transactions and Security" and the interrelationship between other modules within the eBusiness field of study. The module comprises transaction processing, transaction security and risk management and has evolved into a multi-discipline partnership between the Accounting and Finance and Information Technology business disciplines. New digital technologies - such as on-line collaboration and on-line resource sharing and exchange will be an integral part of the teaching and learning process.

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  • A course design for flexible learning

    Petrova, K. (2010-04-12T20:55:35Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    Interpreting innovation as “combining information from diverse sources into new knowledge” this paper looks into the advantages which information and communications technology development can bring into the design of a more flexible mode of a delivery. An example of an undergraduate business degree technical course is described.

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  • Traversing the distance between known and unknown: fastening one’s seatbelt in postgraduate creative-practice research supervision

    Engels-Schwarzpaul, A.-Chr. (2010-05-10T21:22:45Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    Practice-based research in art and design is only partially amenable to discursive explication. In an educational framework that relies on notions of master/student relationships, in which the former is supposed to pass knowledge on to the latter, this fact often creates anxieties for both. From Jacques Rancière’s point of view, the master’s ignorance is important for the student’s emancipation. In his book on The Ignorant Schoolmaster, Joseph Jacotot, he claims that learners become emancipated through their own activities of observing, retaining, repeating, verifying, doing, reflecting, taking apart and combining differently. In support of this method of the riddle, the supervisor can teach best by not knowing the subject matter but, instead, providing positive constraints to help keep the researcher on her own path, acknowledging that no two orbits are alike. For any researcher to be able to discover anything new, she has to learn the different languages of theories, things and media. The foundation of such knowledge is, however, not the supervisor/master. Her role, in contrast, is to claim the equality of each intelligent being, to discourage false modesty in students, and to encourage them to make discoveries through experiment and experience: to be attentive and use their own intelligence. For this to happen, master and student need a thing in common that establishes an egalitarian intellectual link between them. In practice-based research in design and art, the thing in common emerges largely through non-discursive media and modes of thought. Here, what can be seen, what can be thought about it, and what it can mean is also matter of translation, which Walter Benjamin, in The Task of the Translator, described as a mutually complimentary relationship between the languages of original and translation. No language in itself can give form to truth – and the task of a translation is to reveal what remains repressed in the original. In the many forms of translation involved in creative-practice research, candidate and supervisor work ‘between the lines’, in the interstices between the unknown and known, translating and re-translating. This paper explores, drawing on concepts by Benjamin, Rancière, Dewey, Wittgenstein and Kleist, which aspects help or prevent a situation in which students can respond to someone speaking to them, rather than examining them, under the sign of equality.

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  • Out there: Whare and Fale performing abroad

    Engels-Schwarzpaul, A.-Chr. (2010-05-10T21:22:47Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    What was once classed as 'savage ornament', which could not possibly register as architecture, has today morphed into the stuff of 'iconic architecture'. From another perspective, what began as a whare tupuna or a fale tele has sometimes turned into curios, for a time only or for ever. Along with the changes in status, these houses also changed their performative roles. This paper briefly traces the journeys abroad of Māori whare and Samoan fale, in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, which were designed for purposes other than that of their destinations, and some fale and whare that were designed to travel abroad in the 1960s and early 2000s. The houses in the former group often travelled with an accompanying expectation: that relationships would be performed and fulfilled. In the latter case, this expectation seems to have been replaced with more instrumental ones. But on the websites promoting them, relationships still feature as important parts of their essence and performance. This paper explores similarities and differences in the representation and performance of Māori and Samoan architecture and culture overseas, with respect to notions of relationships, visibility, agency, and interpretation.

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  • ISPs - pricing internet success

    Petrova, K. (2010-04-12T20:55:32Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    Access to the Internet is provided by a number of commercial entities known as Internet Service Providers who constitute the Internet backbone and act as mediators between the user and the Internet. A variety of pricing methods have been considered in the literature and implemented in practice. While congestion control is a necessary condition for the smooth operation of the global Internet and affects all users, demand for service differentiation is related to the requirements of specific applications using the Internet as an infrastructure. The pricing model of an Internet Service Provider needs to be able to accommodate the levels of service offered.

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  • The SMOL case: the SoDIS approach to teaching "electronic transactions security"

    Petrova, K.; Sinclair, R. (2010-04-12T20:55:34Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    There is an increasing vulnerability of businesses to attacks on their systems, which has given rise to an increased interest in areas such as information security and risk management. In the project discussed here, the methodology developed for SoDIS (Software Development Impact Statement) was applied to evaluate risks related to business stakeholders, and to justify a security solution. A teaching case study was used. This report provides an update on the project, as presented at the 8th SoDIS Symposium (July 2006) in Wellington, New Zealand.

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  • Teaching differently: a hybrid delivery model

    Petrova, K. (2010-04-12T20:55:34Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    A variety of frameworks for distant, online and flexible learning have been proposed. This paper looks into the defining features of some of these models and describes the hybrid model of flexible delivery. The hybrid model integrates face-to-face classes of instructed practical works, online learning environments and distance learning units. Based on guided and self-centred student learning the model is capable of recognising multiculturalism and diverse student learning needs. It supports and encourages contributions from all participants and a team approach to teaching and learning.

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  • Reflective practice and action research as a source of pre-service and in-service professional development and classroom innovation: burden or benefit? myth or reality?

    Denny, HG (2009-05-27T22:15:19Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    The concept of the teacher as reflective practitioner and teacher as researcher of his/her own classroom practice now has a long 20th and 21st century tradition and is promoted widely in the teacher education literature of recent years. But does it have real benefits for teacher skill development and innovation in classroom practice? This paper describes the outcomes of two research projects. The first examines the effectiveness of a reflective practice exercise carried out by both pre-service and inservice English teachers at AUT. The other follows the development of a collaborative action research project in which teachers reflected on and took steps to improve the teaching of casual conversation in their own classrooms. The paper will draw conclusions about the benefits and constraints for teachers of both reflective practice and the more formal action research, examining to what extent they help teachers to develop skills and encourage innovation in the classroom. Recommendations are made for future practice to support both reflective practice and its formalisation as action research.

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  • Developing novice researchers understandings of research

    Clear, Tony; Young, A. (2009-05-27T22:14:32Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper reports progress from an action research programme to develop an active research community amongst New Zealand computing educators. Since 1998 the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications (NACCQ) has sponsored a number of "Getting Started in Research Workshops". Topics addressed in the workshops have included definitions of research, the maturity profiles of researchers and the nature of research conducted under different research paradigms. The workshops have developed from an initial educative and developmental focus for novice researchers, to one that now embodies more of a critical perspective, in which participants reflect upon and collectively discuss their own beliefs and understandings as educators and researchers within the NACCQ sector. This has required the development of specific self-assessment instruments. These include an instrument for assessing researcher maturity and a further instrument for self-assessment of paradigm preferences in curriculum development and research. Preliminary results from these self-assessments have been reported (Clear & Young, 2001) which give some insights into the understandings about research of computing educators and novice researchers in the sector. But developing and refining these self-assessment instruments is a continuing process. Since this self-assessment process has been undertaken as a means of actively modelling use of the critical method in research, determining forms of analysis that are consonant with this paradigm is a current issue for the authors. This paper will discuss the context, the instruments developed, review the issues related to analysis of data gathered to date, and indicate future directions for this research.

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  • Mobile commerce adoption: end-user/customer views

    Petrova, K. (2010-04-12T20:55:35Z)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    A number of research articles published recently emphasize the strong potential of mobile commerce, the competitive advantage it might bring to providers and to developers, and the benefits to be enjoyed by private and commercial end-users. On the other side, voices from the industry declare that mobile commerce has failed to deliver and that the initially rapid uptake has slowed down. The literature on mobile commerce is rich in frameworks and models, which vary in form from general to application-specific. To study this rapidly evolving phenomenon, we propose a research model which includes the relationships between users, the technology, and the mobile commerce value chain.

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  • MakeUse V2: digital textile technology for user modifiable zero waste fashion

    McQuillan, Holly (2014-04)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    The evolving discourse on zero waste fashion design addresses justifications and approaches for designing and making these garments in ways that attempt to fit within the existing structure of fashion education and industry. However, little has been explored about the relationship between the outcomes of zero waste fashion design and the potentially elevated fashion user experience it might enable. This paper and associated creative works explore the emerging field of enriching the fashion user experience: the post-production and post-retail environment; an area that historically the fashion industry has given little attention to. MakeUse builds on Kate Fletcher’s work within Local Wisdom, specifically in the context of what she terms the Craft of Use of clothing, and the application of knowledge and skill which enables us to “mitigate … intensify, and adapt” clothing to suit our lives. MakeUse places zero waste fashion practice in the context of user practice, where the user becomes an agent in both the design and ongoing use and modification of the garment. Through actions and opportunities facilitated by the designer, an enriched designer/maker/user relationship is possible. Using methods such as digital textile print and embroidery, embedded instructional material, online support and distributed production, MakeUse provides user modifiable zero waste fashion products and an associated product use experience that acknowledges both the opportunities and limitations each user brings, while intensifying their skills, knowledge, needs and desires.

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  • Designing a two-phase glow-in-the-dark pattern on textiles

    Kooroshnia, Marjan (2014-04)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    Although many research projects have explored ways of creating light- emitting fabric displays using LEDs, electro-luminescent wires, and optical fibres, fewer research projects have investigated ways of designing glow-in-the-dark surface patterns using photo-luminescent pigments in textile and fashion design. This may be due to a lack of adequate experimental exploration, as well as a lack of documented information with which to guide textile and fashion designers regarding how these pigments can be used to create such patterns. This article reports on findings based on the design properties and potentials of photo-luminescent pigments with regard to textiles. Through practice-based research, a series of design experiments were created which demonstrate ways of understanding and working with photo-luminescent pigments when designing glow-in-the-dark patterns for textiles. Through experimentation with plain and complex motifs, the influence of using photoluminescent pigments on the process of creating of a glow-in-the-dark surface pattern was examined. The results indicated that, since the colours of positive and negative spaces were reversed in dark conditions, it provided an opportunity to create tessellated surface patterns similar to those of patterns created by Maurits Cornelis Escher. Predicting the effect produced by complex printed patterns was not as easy as predicting that produced by plain printed patterns, stressing the need for tools that allowed the designer to simulate and observe the glow-in-the-dark effect before starting to print. A two-phase pattern was then created, with different expressions in daylight and darkness. For this purpose, each colour of textile pigment paste was mixed with a combination of photo-luminescent pigment and binder, and then printed on to the chosen fabric. The effect produced by the mixture in darkness was a gradation of light, like a tone or value halfway between a highlight and a dark shadow and similar to that produced by a printed, glow-in-the-dark halftone. These research experiments provide textile and fashion designers with a textile printing method that allows them to create two-phase glow-in-the-dark patterns with identical forms in daylight and darkness, but with two expressions in each. It also offers recipes for print formulation and documents results, offering a new design resource for textile surface pattern designers to promote creativity in design. In so doing, the article provides fundamental knowledge for the creation of glow-in-the-dark surface patterns on textiles.

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  • The fashion system and the ephemeral: ballet and costume

    O’Brien, Caroline (2014-04)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper interrogates the theory that dress is synonymous with the identity of the ballerina. Rooted in the seventeenth century French court, classical ballet is perhaps our last vestige of aristocratic manners and civility. The early court dances were encumbered by dress of the day, arguably identifiable in its silhouette and material composition. In 1832 Marie Taglioni made a landmark contribution to the ballet, the combination of the romantic tutu and the satin slippers that allowed her to elevate onto her toes. The ballerina evolved over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as an iconic symbol of feminine virtue, permitting an earthbound mortal with a gift for movement to transcend her corporeal bonds and hover over the earth. The religion of the ballerina might be described as an art of high ideals and self-control in which a public aristocratic bearing and grace symbolize private virtue and an elevated state of being. The classical tutu is an esoteric garment, an evolution of theatrical pragmatism and ephemeral fashion, but in its lightness, sparkle and elegance, in the craft and dedication that go into its making, the tutu embodies everything that ballet is about. This paper considers the ways the tutu constructs and articulates an appropriate ballerina femininity, demonstrating that this iconic functional artefact of the ballet is beautiful in its own right. Expressive of the dichotomy inherent to the life of the ballerina, the pristine surface exists in sharp contrast to the stains of sweat and makeup combined with the tang of anxiety embedded in the layers, illuminating the signs of a ballerina’s work. The trained and honed contours of the ballerina body become transformed in the adoption of the carapace that is the bodice bordered with a wide froth of pleated netting. The garment offers a fragile, protective space that defines a boundary between the unfinished, vulnerable, leaky-at-the-margins body and the pristine and glittering seamless surface. The geometric and architectural shapes performed by the ballerina present an infinitely recognizable silhouette on the stage. The ballet costume sustains and is sustained by the aristocratic codes of manners and behaviour, and has continued to transform itself innumerable times during its history. If classical ballet is about movement, theatrical presentation and storytelling, the tutu becomes the only material evidence of the performance while the dance itself remains an ephemeral art form, leaving no record.

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  • Past, present and future: transformational approaches to utilizing archives for research, learning and teaching

    Britt, Helena; Stephen-Cran, Jimmy; Shaw, Alan (2014-04)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    This article focuses on transformational approaches to utilizing archives in the creation of textile and textile-related products. The existing context in terms of historical resource and archive use by the textile industry and for textile-based creative practice, research, learning and teaching, is discussed. Literature, projects and examples reviewed indicate reproductive, adaptive and transformative approaches to working from historical and archival resources. In the context of this article reproduction involves copying, adaptation refers to alterations and transformation involves complete change in form, nature or appearance. A deficit in existing studies surrounding articulation of approaches to archive utilization is identified. Three projects undertaken at The Glasgow School of Art (GSA) are presented as case studies, which seek to fill the identified gap and contribute to existing research. For each case study, the aims and contributions to research are described and an overview of the project context and methodology is provided. Findings in terms of approaches to archive utilization are discussed, as are the outputs and outreach activities resulting from the projects, which ensures that to some extent, examination of the past informs creative activity in the present and impacts upon the future creation of textiles. The paper concludes by discussing how the case studies have evidenced varying approaches to archive utilization and proposes recommendations to formulate forthcoming strategies and activities.

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  • The transformative cuts: new foundations in pattern cutting and approximations of the body

    Lindqvist, Rickard (2014-04)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    Fashion designers are presented with a range of different principles for pattern cutting, and interest in this area has grown rapidly over the past few years, due to both the publication of a number of works dealing with the subject in different ways, and the fact that a growing number of designers emphasize experimental pattern cutting in their practices. Although a range of principles and concepts for pattern cutting are presented from different perspectives, the main body of these systems, traditional as well as contemporary, is predominantly based on a quantified approximation of the body. As a consequence, the connection between existing theories for pattern construction and the dynamic expression and biomechanical function of the body are problematic. This work explores and proposes an alternative theory for pattern cutting, which unlike existing models, takes as its point of origin the actual, variable body. As such, the research presented here is basic research. Instead of a static matrix of a nonmoving body, the proposed model for cutting garments is based on a qualitative approximation of the body, visualized through balance lines and key biomechanical points. Based on some key principles found in works by Geneviève Sevin-Doering, the proposed model for cutting is developed through concrete experiments by cutting and draping fabrics on live models. The proposed theory is an alternative principle for dressmaking, which challenges the fundamental relationship between dress, pattern making, and the body, opening up for new expressions in dress and functional possibilities for wearing.

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  • The Wardrobe Hack and Uncatwalk digital platforms of action and services for positive engagement with clothing

    Whitty, Jennifer (2014-04)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    "The choices we make about what we wear are influenced by life present, lives past and our ideas about our future selves. Expressions of values ... build a rationale for dress that transcend narrow commercial views about fashion. Instead they give us broader perspectives that honour our reality as well as our aspirations; and connect our psyche with our fibre and fashion choices." (Fletcher, 2014) This research explores the emerging field of enriching the user experiences of people involved with fashion in the post-production sector and in the post-retail environment. This is an area in which historically the fashion industry has paid little attention. This research addresses the question, can designers create courses of actions or “services” using digital media that enable “users” of clothing to embrace the positive aspects of dress for a creative and satisfying experience of fashion? The research builds on Kate Fletcher’s work within the “Local Wisdom” international fashion research project, which provided a forum for critiquing the dominant logic of growth in a world of finite limits (Daly, 1992; Jackson, 2009) by applying design skills to offer user-initiated examples of resourceful practices (Manzini & Jegou, 2003). The projects “Wardrobe Hack” (2014), developed by researchers Whitty and McQuillan, and “Uncatwalk” (2014), developed by Whitty, explore the emerging field of enriching the fashion user experience by utilizing digital platforms for disseminating and extending this engagement. The Uncatwalk website provides a digital media interface for a democratic virtual global exchange of interactions involving fashion. The Wardrobe Hack site provides a service for empowering and sharing clothing user stories and systems. We currently have a situation in society where there is low participation with clothing, as clothes are disposed of rapidly. This research seeks to address this situation to create a better integration of clothing and meaning in our lives. It aims to get to the heart of the current issues in the fashion industry and propose positive alternative roles for designers and consumers. Ezio Manzini (1997) has long declared that sustainability is a societal journey, brought about by acquiring new awareness and perceptions. Guy Julier (2008) makes a case that design activism builds on what already exists. In keeping with this thinking these research projects have been developed with direct participation from members of the public.

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  • In high heels on shifting ground: fashioning lives in the aftermath of the Christchurch earthquake

    Cie, Christina (2014-04)

    Conference paper
    Auckland University of Technology

    Clothing serves as a marker of identity, but how do you dress when you have nothing left but the clothes that you were wearing when you had to run? Who are you, when dressed entirely in someone else’s choice of clothes? Does the resourcefulness necessary for self-expression under such circumstances also reinforce our ability to cope and survive on a more than material level? What can losing everything help us to remember? Taking the earthquakes in Christchurch, New Zealand as its starting point, this article will examine the usefulness of fashion, sometimes dismissed as a “frivolous” concern, during times of crisis. It will consider examples from these and other catastrophic events, considering how individuals and communities have used fashion as an expression of resilience and to defy the devastation wrought by disaster (Howell, 2012; Labrum, McKergow, & Gibson, 2007). The article will be structured to consider the “epicentre” of the effect of the earthquake, as on the individual, the wider social ramifications as the tremors ripple out, and the aftershocks that can continue to disrupt attempts at re-establishing daily patterns. “Habitus” is defined as a state of mind by the sociologist Pierre Bourdieu (Bourdieu & Nice 1977). It is what we practice, what has been “preached” to us, and what we have picked up from our surroundings. However, this mental space, a culmination of personal and cultural memory, requires a habitat, a physical place for its expression and evolution. Analysis of the success of the temporary Re:START mall, created from shipping containers, offers a case study on the role of fashion, as retail and spectacle, in the vigorously debated regeneration of this city. Workplaces, offices, bars and clubs serve as venues for interaction, identification and individuality, but if we dress up to go out, what happens when there is nowhere left to go to? If the street is gone, how could a shop serve “street style”, and act as a site for social interaction as well as retail and revenue? What role can fashion play in reinvigorating public spaces and events in a devastated area? From individual efforts to community initiatives, what is the role of fashion in the recovery of a city, and the cultural life of a region?

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