60 results for Auckland University of Technology, Report

  • The Auckland economy: situation and forecast, November 2009

    Nana, G; Sanderson, K; Leung-Wai, J; Shirley, I; Wilson, D; Neill, CM; Slack, A; Stokes, F; Norman, D; Lynn, A (2012-01-27)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    BERL and the Institute of Public Policy at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) have combined to pull together an economic forecast for the Auckland region economy. Latest employment data released last week confirm that the much-heralded end of the recession remains little more than a technicality. This is as true for the Auckland economy as it is for its national counterpart. The net 13,000 jobs shed from the Auckland economy over the past year mean annual employment contracted by nearly 3 percent over that period. Looking ahead, hopes of an export-led recovery for the New Zealand economy have been dashed by an exchange rate that defies any rational assessment of the fundamentals. Consequently, the short-term outlook for the Auckland economy is best described as unstable. Clearly, the next few months will be better than the first half of 2009, but there will be little to celebrate. We forecast: a sombre export picture for manufacturing; modest, at best, employment growth; a subdued outlook for retail trade; import growth slightly above national; net inward migration gains; moderate house price growth; growth in house building activity; guest nights treading water.

    View record details
  • Women's career progression in Auckland law firms: views from the top, views from below

    Pringle, J; Giddings, L; Harris, C; Jaeger, S; Lin, S; Ravenswood, K; Ryan, I (2014-03-17)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

    View record details
  • The Internet in New Zealand 2013

    Gibson, A; Miller, M; Smith, P; Bell, A; Crothers, C (2013-12-16)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Executive Summary The fourth survey of the World Internet Project New Zealand (WIPNZ) was conducted between late July and early September 2013. For the first time, the sample in 2013 used both telephone and internet surveys. This report presents an analysis of the usage of and attitudes to the internet of the resulting sample of 2006 New Zealanders. As internet use approaches saturation in New Zealand, our focus turns from ‘how many people use the internet?’ to ‘how do people use the internet?’ and ‘why do some not use the internet at all?’ To answer these questions, the sample has been divided into five categories: never-users (5% of sample), ex-users (3%), low level users (14%), first generation users (40%) and next generation users (38%). Usage For a large number of people the internet is used daily. Four out of five spend an hour or more online at home every day. Almost everyone under 40 is online, so that only 1% of our under-40 sample are non-users. Accessing the internet ‘on the go’ is prevalent. Seven out of ten users access the internet from a hand-held mobile device such as a smartphone or an iPad. Almost half of the internet users surveyed (48%) said that they had accessed the internet through a tablet, while an even higher proportion (68%) connected through their mobile phone in the past year. Activities Most internet users say they surf or browse the web (96%) or visit social networking sites (81%). 34% of internet users report that they use the cloud, 41% purchase apps and almost two thirds (65%) download free apps. Most users check their email daily (89%). Just over 60% of men aged 30–44 said they have looked at sites with sexual content. Māori and Pasifika internet users, especially those in lower income households, take the lead in subscriptions to music streaming services like Spotify. More than one in five Māori (21%) and Pasifika (23%) users in households with annual incomes of less than $50,000 have paid for a subscription to a music streaming service in the past year. The internet is used as a tool for consumer decision making, with 94% of users looking for information about products online – more than half of users do this at least weekly. For 85% of users, this kind of online research includes comparing prices. Almost half of our users (47%) have logged in to secure areas on Government or Council websites, and 51% have paid taxes, fines or licences online in the past year. Comparing the importance of media Comparing the importance of various forms of media as information sources, 81% of all our respondents rated the internet (including online media such as streamed radio) as important or very important. This was very much higher than the proportion who rated offline media as important: television (47%), radio (37%) and newspapers (37%). One of the most dramatic differences according to age group is the importance of the internet as a source of entertainment and leisure. While watching (offline) television is an important leisure activity for people across all ages, using the internet as a form of entertainment is a young-person phenomenon: 80% of respondents aged 16–29 rate it as important or very important. This 2013 survey has a different sample structure than previous years in order to include New Zealanders without a landline. The questionnaire has also undergone substantial updating to keep pace with changing digital technologies. For these reasons, the present report focuses solely on the findings for 2013, and longitudinal analyses will be presented in a subsequent report next year.

    View record details
  • Predicting the distribution of acid volatile sulfide in marine sediment from colour analysis of sediment-profile images

    Wilson, P; Vopel, K (2011-07-25)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Organic enrichment of coastal sediments is a major concern worldwide. It is caused by an increase in the deposition of organic matter via terrestrial runoff (Gray et al. 2002) and aquaculture (Holmer & Kristensen 1994), or as a result of eutrophication driven by anthropogenic loading of coastal waters with phosphorus and nitrogen (Nixon 1995, Cloern 2001, Rosenberg et al. 2009). In coastal waters the majority of deposited organic carbon is mineralised by bacterial sulfate reduction because of the abundance of sulfate in the marine environement (Thode-Andersen & Jørgensen 1989, Bagarinao 1992). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), produced during sulfate reduction, reacts with dissolved iron or reactive iron minerals to form acid-extractable iron sulfides (termed acid volatile sulfide, AVS) that contribute to the distinct black colouration of organic-rich sediment. Although there is a strong relationship between sedimentary sulfide content and organic matter input, its measurement has not been used in routine monitoring because of its laborious nature. Bull and Williamson (2001) tested a new approach to predict the sediment AVS concentration from sediment images. The authors used film photography in a laboratory and found a weak linear correlation (R2 = 0.67) between sediment colour and AVS concentration.

    View record details
  • Lotteries literature review: final report

    Bellringer, M; Abbott, M (2011-09-07)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This report provides an overview of available literature relating to lotteries products, based on five specific question areas of focus: • To what extent do lotteries products in general and New Zealand lotteries products in particular appeal to problem and under-age gamblers? Do someproducts appeal more than others and, if so, can this be described? • What policies, programmes, codes of practice and corporate social responsibility guidelines have other lotteries adopted and is there any evidence about the impact these have had on problem and under-age gamblers? • What other lotteries have made existing or new products available on the internet or via electronic media and what impact, if any, have these had on problem and under-age gambling? • What is the role of lotteries marketing in shaping people’s views on participating in lotteries and about gambling in general? • What education programmes or materials have been developed to educate gamblers about responsible gambling and are there examples of ‘good practice’ in this area? The review was commissioned by the New Zealand Lotteries Commission in order that research gaps could be identified and recommendations made for research that the New Zealand Lotteries Commission could potentially contract. The review consisted of an extensive search of library and other electronic databases, personal specialist collections and grey literature. Professional and personal networks were also drawn on to locate unpublished reports and more especially, organisational documents relating to social responsibility and/or educational programmes and materials that might otherwise not have been easily accessible via the public domain. Relevant documentation was accessed and critically reviewed. Background and contextual information is provided in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 outlines the methodology used. The literature review (Chapter 3) comprises the main body of the report and is followed by the conclusion (Chapter 4), identified research gaps (Chapter 5) and recommendations for research (Chapter 6). Key points from the review follow, grouped under the five questions areas of focus.

    View record details
  • Foods imported into the Tokelau Islands: 10th May 2008 to 1 April 2012

    Rush, EC; Pearce, L (2013-10-22)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

    View record details
  • Exploration of the impact of gambling and problem gambling on Pacific families and communities in New Zealand

    Bellringer, M; Fa'amatuainu, B; Taylor, S; Coombes, R; Poon, Z; Abbott, M (2013-12-04)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

    View record details
  • Problem gambling assessment and screening instruments: phase one final report

    Bellringer, M; Abbott, M; Volberg, R; Garrett, N; Coombes, R (2011-09-07)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Objectives: This project was commissioned by the Problem Gambling Committee (PGC); subsequently the Ministry of Health assumed responsibility from the PGC. The primary objectives of the project were to: 1. Review the assessment and screening instruments currently used in New Zealand and internationally for the assessment of problem gamblers at the clinical level including by the telephone helpline 2. Following the review, to recommend a full set of screening and assessment instruments to be used in the clinical treatment of problem gamblers; selected instruments will be able to be used to monitor client progress in follow-up assessments currently undertaken at six monthly intervals 3. To pilot the recommended screening and assessment instruments in order to test the application of these screens in the New Zealand setting The research was divided into two phases. There was a particular focus on the screening instruments currently mandated for use by Ministry of Health funded problem gambling service providers, namely the South Oaks Gambling Screen - Three Month time frame (SOGS-3M), DSM-IV gambling criteria, Dollars Lost assessment and Control over Gambling assessment. Other screening tools used by the service providers were also considered. Additionally, the family/whanau checklist was reviewed.

    View record details
  • Sensory modulation in Acute Mental Health wards: a qualitative study of staff and service user perspectives

    Sutton, D; Nicholson, E (2012-06-01)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    The goal of reducing seclusion and restraint in acute mental health services has resulted in the exploration of alternative methods for managing agitated and aggressive behaviour (OHagan, 2006). Sensory modulation intervention has been identified as a potential alternative to more coercive practices by supporting service users to self-regulate when distressed or agitated within acute mental health settings. The approach utilises sensory based equipment, strategies and environments to assist people in optimizing arousal levels and engagement in everyday life. This is an emerging approach within mental health care and there is a need for further research to support its development and application, and provide evidence of its efficacy. The purpose of the research outlined in this report was to explore the feasibility of using sensory interventions in acute psychiatric services with the specific aims of: • Understanding service users’ experience of using sensory modulation as a tool for the de-escalation of arousal. • Exploring staff member perspectives of using sensory modulation as an intervention for the de-escalation of arousal. • To identify specific facilitators and barriers to implementing sensory modulation interventions in acute mental health wards. The qualitative data reported in this document was gathered through service user and staff focus groups and individual interviews. Thematic analysis of the data provided insights into the process and outcomes of sensory modulation practice. The findings suggest that sensory interventions are viewed by both staff and service users as being effective in modulating arousal and promoting de-escalation. Three key outcomes of sensory modulation were identified in the participant accounts, all of which support de-escalation of arousal: • Sensory modulation was perceived as an effective tool for inducing a calm state in the majority of people that used it. • Sensory modulation supported the rapid building of trust and rapport for both service users and staff members. • Sensory modulation facilitated the development of service users’ self-management, increasing their awareness and ability to regulate their own arousal levels. In addition to these intervention outcomes, the findings shed light on the process of sensory modulation and specifically the mechanisms that support the above outcomes. Seven aspects of the intervention were noted as being significant in the participant accounts: • Creating a sense of safety • Soothing through the sensory input • Distracting attention from distressing thoughts, emotions and perceptions • Stabilising or ‘grounding’ through the sensory input • Creating positive associations • Creating a sense of control • Supporting expression and release of thoughts, emotion and energy. These mechanisms interacted in a dynamic process as service users shifted their attention to their bodies and immediate environment, and engaged in a whole sensory experience created by the room, equipment and the supportive presence of a staff member. The findings also highlighted important considerations in implementing the sensory modulation approach; including the set up of the room and use of specific equipment, how staff members can best support service users to access and benefit from the intervention and what organisations need to consider when developing and maintaining a sensory approach within an inpatient service. Overall, participant responses reflected a high level of acceptability and a belief in the efficacy of the intervention. However, sensory modulation must be seen as one component of organisational change process if it is to have an impact on seclusion and restraint rates. Attention needs to be given to relevant policies, leadership and training if the intervention is to be used effectively as a routine and effective addition to practice.

    View record details
  • Pasifika youth in South Auckland: family, community, gangs, culture, leadership and the future

    Nakhid, C; Collins, E; Tanielu, R (2012-06-13)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Pasifika youth make a significant impact on the demographic profile of South Auckland and are a major focus of the many projections regarding population, employment and education in Aotearoa/New Zealand. The place of family and community is regarded as an important influence on the future of Pasifika youth yet how these youth view the place of Pasifika families in the future is not adequately covered in the research literature. As more Pasifika youth are thought to be joining gangs, there are also concerns as to whether the gangs have replaced the family for Pasifika youth and whether the street has become home to these youth.

    View record details
  • HYBRIDJOIN for Near Real-time Data Warehousing

    Naeem, M; Dobbie, G; Weber, G (2012-04-26)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    In order to make timely and effective decisions, businesses need the latest information from data warehouse repositories. To keep these repositories up-to-date with respect to the end user updates, near real-time data integration is required. An important phase in near real-time data integration is data transformation where the stream of updates is joined with disk-based master data. The stream-based algorithm, Hybrid Join (HYBRIDJOIN), performs well in general but has not been optimized for real world conditions. In real world market economics, a few products are sold more frequently as compared to the rest of the products; therefore, a large number of sale transactions relate to a small portion of master data. In the transformation phase, to join the input stream of sales transactions with disk-based master data, HYBRIDJOIN loads that particular part of master data each time from the disk, increasing the disk access cost significantly with a negative effect on performance. Contrarily, X-HYBRIDJOIN stores that particular part of master data in memory permanently, eliminating the disk access overhead significantly. To validate the arguments and analyze the performance of X-HYBRIDJOIN an experimental study is conducted.

    View record details
  • A literature review on the effects of living wage policies

    Maloney, TJ (2014-02-19)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

    View record details
  • Forest and Wood Products Australia Project PN04.2005: maximising impact sound resistance of timber framed floor/ceiling systems

    Chung, H; Emms, G; Dodd, G; Schmid, G; McGunnigle, K (2013-10-31)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This project further developed existing Australasian and overseas research to produce floor/ceiling systems for floors having acoustic properties which are comparable with concrete floor constructions, while also meeting the acoustic requirements of the Australian and New Zealand building codes, and being cost effective and buildable using existing construction industry skills. The project was divided up into a number of aspects, with the focus being on low-frequency impact insulation performance: Theoretical modelling; Experimental testing; and Subjective testing. The results produced design recommendations for a timber floor with low-frequency performance equal to a concrete floor.

    View record details
  • Mid-term evaluation of the Strengthening Pacific Partnerships project

    Nunns, H; Roorda, M; Bedford, C; Bedford, R

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This report presents the findings of an independent, mid-term evaluation of the Strengthening Pacific Partnerships (SPP) project for the 18 month period October 2011 to March 2013. The main report presents the valuation findings about the SPP project, including general observations about the seven Pacific States involved in SPP. Appendix A includes the specific findings for each of the States.1 In this report, the term “respondent” refers to a person who was interviewed for the evaluation. The term “official” refers to a Government employee in a Pacific state unless otherwise stated.

    View record details
  • Infinite dimensional mixed economies with asymmetric information

    Bhowmik, A; Cao, J (2012-01-11)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    In this paper, we study asymmetric information economies consisting of both non-negligible and negligible agents and having ordered Banach spaces as their commodity spaces. In answering a question of Hervés-Beloso and Moreno-García in [17], we establish a characterization of Walrasian expectations allocations by the veto power of the grand coalition. It is also shown that when an economy contains only negligible agents a Vind's type theorem on the private core with the exact feasibility can be restored. This solves a problem of Pesce in [20].

    View record details
  • Strengthening engagements between schools and the science community

    Gilbert, J; Bolstad, R; Bull, A; Carson, S; MacIntyre, W; Spiller, L (2013-12-05)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This research aimed to generate evidence-based recommendations for strengthening partnerships between schools and the science community to support students’ science learning and engagement. It was underpinned by a future-oriented perspective, framed by larger questions about the purpose of science education in the context of a rapidly changing 21st-century world. The report digs beneath assumptions about why learners’ and teachers’ engagement with the science community is considered important, and examines what kinds of approaches and supports might sustain future-oriented science education for New Zealand learners.

    View record details
  • Super City? State of Auckland report

    Neill, CM; Crothers, C; McGregor, J; Hanna, K; Fletcher, M; Wilson, D (2013-12-12)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Auckland is New Zealand’s bold experiment in local government. Is the Super City a success, a disappointment or something in between? The local government elections in 2013 provide an opportunity to assess the state of Auckland. How is New Zealand’s largest city measuring up three years on from the unique governance reforms that created it? This report examines various areas of living in Auckland; its people and communities, democratic participation, the economy, the state of the built and natural environment, transport and other infrastructure, public services, confidence in Auckland’s regional and local governance and value for money. It aims to help citizens make informed decisions when they vote in the 2013 local government elections. It also allows them to be involved in a continuing research project that assesses the city they live in.

    View record details
  • Formative investigation into the effectiveness of gambling venue exclusion processes in New Zealand

    Bellringer, M; Coombes, R; Pulford, J; Abbott, M (2011-09-07)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Exclusion of patrons from gambling venues is potentially an effective early intervention for minimising harm from excessive gambling since it may contribute to the treatment and/or recovery of people with developing and established gambling problems. Internationally, some jurisdictional regulations mandate „imposed exclusion‟ programmes, where gamblers with problems are identified by venue staff (usually casinos) and barred from gambling at those venues. In other jurisdictions, „self-exclusion‟ programmes are in place, where gamblers may request that they be banned from the venue, removed from its mailing list and potentially face legal consequences if they re-enter the premises. Traditionally, such self-exclusion programmes have been operated by casinos but increasingly are being required for clubs and pubs where electronic gaming machines are located. In New Zealand, The Gambling Act 2003 stipulates that both imposed- and self- exclusion measures should be operated. The Act refers to these exclusion measures as an "order‟ but colloquial use of the term "contract‟ has been used throughout this report due to the word usage amongst participants in this research and in the literature. However, there is a paucity of research regarding the effectiveness of gambling venue exclusion processes per se and even less information outside the casino environment. In addition, the effectiveness of the particular processes in force in New Zealand has not been evaluated. Currently, different processes are operated by different venues, for example with variations in minimum and maximum exclusion periods, and different requirements for re-entering the gambling venue when an exclusion contract comes to an end. Given that exclusion programmes consume private and public resources and are a legislated requirement, it is important that their effectiveness be ascertained. This will have substantial implications in terms of the potential to improve existing processes to ensure maximum minimisation of harms from gambling. In August 2008, the Gambling and Addictions Research Centre at Auckland University of Technology was commissioned by the Ministry of Health to conduct the research project Formative investigation into the effectiveness of gambling venue exclusion processes in New Zealand. The purpose of this project was two-fold: a) to ascertain the most suitable methodology and processes for researching venue excluders in order to robustly evaluate the effectiveness of current venue exclusion processes, and b) to gain some initial insight into the effectiveness of gambling (particularly electronic gaming machine and casino) venue exclusion processes in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • Evaluation of problem gambling intervention services: stage three final report

    Bellringer, M; Coombes, R; Pulford, J; Garrett, N; Abbott, M (2011-09-07)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    The Ministry of Health is responsible for the funding and coordination of problem gambling services and activities in New Zealand. This includes the funding of a national telephone helpline, two national face-to-face counselling services and several regional treatment providers which include Maori and Pacific specific services (Asian specific services are provided as a division of one of the national face-to-face treatment providers) (Ministry of Health, 2008a). From 2008, the Ministry of Health funded face-to-face problem gambling treatment providers have received specific training around the Ministry of Health expectations for service practice requirements (e.g. the types of intervention that will be funded and the processes expected within those interventions as well as for referrals for co-existing issues), and expectations around data collection, management and information submission to the Ministry of Health. The Ministry of Health has also identified specific sets of screening instruments to be used with clients, which vary depending on whether the client is receiving a Brief or Full-length intervention, or is a problem gambler or family/whanau member („significant other‟) of a gambler. These screening instruments came into use in 2008, with different sets of instruments having been used previously. At the present time, the effectiveness of the current problem gambling treatment services is largely unknown, as is the optimal intervention process for different types of client. Whilst this sort of information can ultimately only be ascertained through rigorously conducted effectiveness studies (randomised controlled trials) (Westphal & Abbott, 2006), an evaluation (process, impact and outcome) of services could provide indications as to optimal treatment pathways and approaches for problem gamblers and affected others, as well as identifying successful strategies currently in existence nationally and internationally and areas for improvement in current service provision. In September 2008, the Gambling and Addictions Research Centre at Auckland University of Technology was commissioned by the Ministry of Health to conduct the research project Evaluation of problem gambling intervention services. This project was to focus on four priority areas: 1.) Review and analysis of national service statistics and client data to inform workforce development, evaluation of the Ministry of Health systems and processes, and other related aspects 2.) Process and outcome1 evaluation of the effect of different pathways to problem gambling services on client outcomes and delivery 3.) Process and outcome1 evaluation of distinct intervention services 4.) Process and outcome1 evaluation of the roll-out and implementation of Facilitation Services2

    View record details
  • Kaipatiki project environment centre: project analysis

    Douglas, C; Ryoo, Y; Davis, M (2011-10-13)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Kaipatiki Project

    View record details