2,526 results for Auckland University of Technology, Thesis

  • Exploring noise sensitivity: cardiac correlates of noise sensitivity and the auditory evoked orienting response

    Mulgrew, Joseph (2014-05-12)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    A growing body of evidence suggests Noise Sensitivity (NS) moderates the relationship between noise exposure and stress-related disease. As NS is pronounced within several clinical disorders, its biological mechanisms are of clinical and epidemiological import. Central Neurovisceral Integrative System (NIS, Thayer & Brosschot, 2005) concepts were drawn from to argue that autonomic balance (AB) provides an influential biological mechanism underlying NS and, additionally, that AB and NS influence the Auditory Evoked Orientation Response (AEOR). Baseline Heart Rate Variability (HRV) and NS, as measured by the NS Questionnaire (Schütte, Marks, Wenning, & Griefahn, 2007), were collected from 103 Auckland University of Technology staff and students and were used to analyse the neurovisceral correlates of NS. Furthermore, 60 participants went on to provide cardiac data recorded during and post exposure to auditory stimuli of varying valence, which were used to analyse the influence of autonomic balance and NS on the AEOR. The results of the study provide some limited support for both propositions. Findings are discussed with reference to AB, total regulatory capacity, emotion, and orientating. Although questions are left unanswered, future research directions are postulated that could culminate in the development of both screening and treatment protocols with pronounced clinical applications.

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  • Lesbian, gay and bisexual clients’ experiences of discussing sexual identity in therapy

    Tsai, Sandy (2014-05-19)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The current study explores lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) individuals’ experiences of discussing sexual identity in therapy. Current literature indicate that the absence of sexual identity issues being identified and discussed could be a significant barrier to effective therapy with LGB clients. However, little research has explored how sexual identity is conceptualized in therapy by LGB clients and their therapists, and how this influences their therapeutic outcomes. Using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA), LGB clients’ experiences of discussing sexual identity in therapy was investigated. Results clustered into three overarching themes: 1. Sexual identity as self in the making; 2. Sexual identity as a barrier; and 3. Sexual identity as increased awareness of oppression. Discussion of sexual identity is important for LGB clients in therapy, regardless of whether it is the main focus of their presenting issues. These discussions help them explore their sexual identity formation processes, which result in a stronger sense of identity due to a better understanding of sexual identity as an aspect of themselves. LGB clients who lack such opportunities to discuss sexual identity in therapy experience heteronormative assumptions and biases from their therapists, which increased their awareness of themselves as individuals of sexual minority and empathy towards others under oppression. The current study concludes that therapists should remain open-minded and explorative when helping LGB clients discuss their sexual identities in therapy, but always in context to their presenting issues so that conceptualizations and sense-making of sexual identity is centred in the clients’ subjective experiences

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  • Turning points in therapy with Bulimia Nervosa clients: a qualitative analysis of the therapist's perceptions

    Mysliwiec, Nadia

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This research explored therapeutic turning points as experienced by therapists working with clients diagnosed with Bulimia Nervosa. A growing body of research reveals that turning points make important contributions to change, transformation and recovery during therapy (King et al. 2003). This research aims to develop a deeper understanding of how turning points and mindfulness-based techniques effect the treatment of this complex eating disorder. While there is existing research on the turning points that occur during therapy with eating disorder clients there is a paucity of research on the turning points that occur specifically with clients diagnosed with Bulimia Nervosa. Studies have documented various changes in clients during and after treatment for bulimia, however, most of this research stems from quantitative data and little from the actual experiences of clients and their therapists. Therefore, this study conducted in-depth interviews with five experienced psychologists and psychotherapists working in this field. Using Braun and Clarke’s (2006) six-step guide to thematic analysis, five major themes emerged from the therapists’ discourses. Firstly, therapists believed that it was essential for their clients to build social relationships with others, and that one of the first turning points was the initial trust and collaboration between client and therapist. Secondly, therapists said that an important turning point in therapy was when clients felt that they wanted to change. This need was often driven by a client’s shame and guilt related to their bulimia and the detrimental consequences of their illness. Thirdly, it was crucial for clients to experience a feeling of success. An initial turning point, as experienced by the therapists, was when a client could resist the urge to binge and purge. This allowed the client to feel empowered and hopeful, in turn increasing their motivation and allowing space for the clients to realise that their lives could be different. Fourthly, therapists strongly believed that “negative” turning points were just as useful as positive ones. Lastly, therapists supported the use of mindfulness and acknowledged the positive influence it had on turning points. A key turning point was when clients could let go of their rigid thinking and be with their emotions. This often lead to “ah-ha” moments, ultimately facilitating the realisation that bulimia is a choice they could have control over. This study has added to the growing field examining the turning points that occur in therapy with clients diagnosed with Bulimia Nervosa and has yielded much needed information for practice and future research.

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  • Teenage girls' daily engagement with mass media: implications for identity construction and well-being

    Gooch, Andrea

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    A process of identity formation often defines teenage years where young people transition into adulthood. Multiple factors such as family environment and sociocultural context contribute to shaping teen girls’ identities, what they believe in and how they see themselves as fitting into the world around them. Mass media plays a big part in constructing social realities, often depicting narrow and limited depictions of masculinity, femininity and ideal girlhood. Young people, who may have less experience and critical awareness when it comes to media messages, may take on stereotypical or problematic images as representing reality. This research project explores from a social constructionist perspective, teenage girls daily engagement with the mass media and the implications of this for their identity construction, health, and well-being. Six face-to-face interviews were conducted with teen girls aged between 14 and 17 years old. These girls were asked to collect media images over one week and their responses to these images were discussed. An inductive thematic analysis was conducted and four dominant themes were identified within the talk: ‘It’s all about appearance’; ‘Attracting the boys’; “Inspirational content”; and ‘The pressure to be “trendy”. These themes are discussed demonstrating the difficult terrain teen girls face in navigating the vast and pervasive nature of mass media in constructing their personal identity. Further research is necessary into the nature of teen girls’ engagement with mass media with comparative data required from a teen boy population to expand and support initial insights gained from this project.

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  • What is the relationship between psychodynamic psychotherapy and the 12 steps of Alcoholics Anonymous? A heuristic enquiry

    Hunter, Phoebe

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This dissertation is a heuristic enquiry into the relationship between psychodynamic psychotherapy and the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous. I make use of my experience as a client of psychodynamic psychotherapy and as someone working the 12 Steps in order to investigate the relationship between them. The research chronicles how I arrived at Alcoholics Anonymous in the context of having spent several years as a client of psychoanalysis. It examines in detail how I make use of the Steps and psychotherapy as distinct but complementary paths to recovery from alcoholism. It explores some of the literature pertaining to psychotherapy and the 12 Steps, specifically emphasising the role of spirituality in recovery and the tensions that can arise between psychodynamic psychotherapy and spirituality. It also explores spirituality within the context of Alcoholics Anonymous for people who do not identify with the concept of an external deity as is written in the 12 Steps. Within psychotherapy there has been confusion and contradiction in how to respond to people with addiction and in Alcoholics Anonymous there has been hostility and mistrust of psychotherapy. From my own experience of entering therapy and struggling with addiction, I became aware of a gap or disjunction in psychoanalytic thinking around treating addiction. I have offered an account of my lived experience in the expectation it will be meaningful and have practical use for people who are seeking help and for the therapists hoping to treat them. I hope that psychotherapists will be able to feel more confident in what they might be able to offer clients and more aware of the limits of what they can offer, so as to feel more encouraged to seek help from other sources if necessary. In making transparent the ways psychotherapy and the Steps operate in my life, I aim to show how both can be usefully integrated to the benefit of both clients with addiction issues and the therapists treating them.

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  • Using a boat instrumentation system to measure and improve elite on-water sculling performance

    Coker, Jennifer (2010-09-07)

    Doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Sculling performance is largely determined by the magnitude and timing of blade force application, i.e. the size and shape of the sculler’s force profile. Discovering specific force profile characteristics that relate strongly with boat velocity in elite scullers, and determining how best to measure them, would allow recommendations for improved performances. The objective of this thesis was to expand knowledge regarding biomechanical measurement of sculling force profiles and to understand how the PowerLine™ boat instrumentation system could be used effectively to measure and improve elite on-water sculling performance. A literature review showed that effective rowing force profiles are large, smooth, rectangular, and have a peak force in front of the perpendicular oar position. Laboratory validity testing showed that PowerLine™ was valid for use with elite scullers, displaying a standard error of the estimate of less than 0.90 kgF for force and less than 0.5° for angle measures. On-water reliability testing established smallest worthwhile effect sizes for PowerLine™ variables for elite scullers completing 500-m trials, including 0.44% for stroke power and 0.5° for angular variables. Scullers in double sculls were more variable than single scullers so consistency in stroke power was recommended as a focus for crew scullers. Sculler analyses using PowerLine™ was better when using the average of five strokes rather than single strokes. Step wise linear regression analyses presented models for two elite scullers explaining 84% and 85% of their variation in boat velocity. However, the relationships between sculling performance and biomechanical stroke variables, including different measures of catch technique, were not consistent between elite scullers and cannot be generalised. Analyses of changes in means for four elite scullers showed that biomechanical stroke variables did differ significantly between single, double and quad sculls and therefore training and selection should be boat class specific. In elite double sculls, correlations between change in performance and change in bow versus stroke peak force synchronization indicated that it is likely to be beneficial to performance if the stroke peaks with their force earlier and with the handles further to the stern than the bow seat. Switching the seating order in these double sculls resulted in mean boat velocity changing by up to 5.8% of world record time signifying the importance of seat-specific trialling. Extensive differences between elite scullers in the strength and direction of relationships between performance and PowerLine™ variables showed that full analyses of all variables must be conducted individually for each sculler. The importance of seating order in double sculls, and the benefits of the stroke seat peaking before the bow, have implications for crew selection, seat allocation, and technical recommendations. Seat trials for crew sculling boats must be seat-specific and include racing in all seating orders. Further research is necessary to verify and explain the synchronisation requirements of crew sculling boats before more scientific seat allocation can be achieved in these boats. Sculling force profiles from PowerLine™ can be used effectively to measure and improve elite on-water sculling performance.

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  • The role of the internet in enabling linkages between tourism and local food in Vanuatu

    Garcia Gonzalez, Marta (2013-07-09)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The Internet enables communities in developing countries to directly communicate with potential visitors at a relatively low cost. The Internet also plays a significant role in the development of a sustainable tourism industry and can enhance the consumption of local food in destinations. The rise of culinary tourism and the demand for participatory experiences offer the opportunity to strengthen linkages between tourism and local food; such developments cannot, however, occur without effective dissemination of information. The purpose of this research is to explore the role of the Internet in enhancing the use of local food in the tourism industry in Vanuatu. The study presents a conceptual framework to explore and create links between tourism and local food through the use of the Internet. The study identifies 500 tourism organisations and businesses, of which 190 have a website. An audit of the 190 tourism websites – 39 destination and 151 business sites – is conducted from an interpretivist perspective. Content and discourse analyses are used to analyse images, texts and hyperlinks to ascertain the way local food is promoted by the Vanuatu tourism industry and the importance placed on it. The study also includes the analysis of 346 online reviews of tourists’ feedback about their experience of local food when staying in local bungalows. This research reveals that the potential of the Internet to link tourism to local food in Vanuatu is not being maximised. Although there is an increasing presence of local food in tourism websites, the analysis of text descriptions and images shows that the key features promoted are related to ocean views and marine activities. A limited number of tourism businesses have a menu in their websites and fewer still promote their restaurants’ local cuisine as a valuable tourist experience. There is also a lack of internal and external hyperlinks to enhance relevant food information and guide visitors to other websites of communities’ interests, such as local producers, events and festivals. Low local Internet presence appears as a major challenge to linking local tourism businesses’ websites to potential food networks. The lack of local tourism businesses’ websites also constrains the promotion of authentic local food experiences to provide a sense of place to visitors. The study shows that the way food is promoted in tourism websites varies across the different islands: familiar “Western” food is depicted in websites of businesses based on Efate, whereas the authenticity and uniqueness of local food is shown in the websites of businesses on the outer islands. Promoting a greater variety of food experiences has the potential to make Vanuatu more attractive as a tourism destination. Tourism websites can still promote and integrate local food-related activities to improve visitor yield. The examination of tourists’ online reviews shows there is tourist demand for local food experiences, but that this demand is not being fully met. A meaningful use of the Internet to promote diverse and distinctive food-related tourism activities would enhance visitors’ experiences and benefits for local residents; however, in Vanuatu, such potential remains largely untapped.

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  • Waist to height ratio in relation to time to run 550 m in primary school children in the Waikato region

    Cooper, Rebecca Jayne (2013-10-22)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Background: Relationships between excess body fat, body fat distribution, and body proportions with physical fitness are important to explore because emphasis is placed on monitoring these health markers during interventions aimed at improving child health. It is known that physical activity and therefore cardiorespiratory fitness are essential for health and life. Therefore can improved physical functionality such as an ability to run 550 m, a measure of cardiorespiratory fitness, be inferred from anthropometric measures in children? There was no published evidence for children on the relationship of the waist to height ratio; a measure of abdominal fatness, in relation to cardiorespiratory fitness. Furthermore the external and relatively fixed influence of ethnicity and social deprivation on physical fitness and interrelations with body fatness are rarely examined together. Explorations undertaken in this body of work aimed to increase the understanding of the relationships of anthropometric measures with a cardiorespiratory fitness measure of 7 and 10-yr old New Zealand (NZ) children from different socioeconomic levels and ethnic groups. Methods: Project Energize is a through-school nutrition and physical activity program provided to Waikato NZ primary schools (land area 25,000 km2) since 2004. An extended evaluation of the program was undertaken in early 2011. Cross sectional data including school demography, ethnicity, location, anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, food and physical activity knowledge questions and time taken to run 550 m were measured, from more than 5000 children, aged mostly 7 or 10-yrs old. From the data a sub-set was utilised for this body of work including, height, weight, waist circumference, and total body fat by bioimpedance analysis measures. Body mass index and waist to height ratio were derived and the physical fitness test was time taken for children to run 550 m (run-time550m) on an outdoor grass track. All school decile levels (a scale where 1 is the most and 10 the least socially deprived, which were ranked and grouped low, medium or high decile) were represented and one third of participants were self-identified as Maori. Just over half the children were NZ European and the remainder were represented by Pacific and Other ethnic groups. Potential confounding effects of asthma (17% prevalence) and rurality (64% of the participants lived rurally) were also examined. To answer the main research question, stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was used establish the most influential predictors of run-time550m. Results: The strongest predictors of run-time550m were, fat mass percent, waist to height ratio, body mass index, waist circumference and school decile group (low, medium or high). The best four models for each age group (7-yr olds, n = 2634; 10-yr olds, n = 2466) to predict run-time550m included: waist to height ratio OR body mass index OR waist circumference OR fat mass percent+age (years)+ gender (girl)+ school decile (low)+ school decile (medium). Similarly in all models, for the 7 and 10-yr old groups, up to 27% and 39%, respectively, of the total variation in run-time550m could be explained. Before and after adjustments the waist to height ratio and fat mass percent appeared to be the most influential anthropometric measurement for prediction of cardiorespiratory fitness in these children. After adjustments, for every 0.01 cm/cm increase waist to height ratio, time to complete 550 m increased in 7-yr olds, 2.8% (95% CI; 2.4%, 3.4%) and in 10-yr olds, 3.3% (2.9%, 3.8%). Compared to body mass index where for every 1 kg/m2 increase there was a 2.1% (95% CI; 1.9%, 2.3%) in 7-yr olds and in 10-y olds, 2.2% (2.0%, 2.3%) increase in run-time550m. A separate analysis demonstrated waist to height ratio increased 0.013 cm/cm for every 1 kg/m2 increase in body mass index after adjusting for age and gender, R = 0.86, P > 0.0001. School decile was an important covariate in each model where the lower decile group took on average 7% and medium decile group 4% longer to run 550 m than the high decile group, after adjustments for body fatness, age and gender. Run-time550m decreased with age and girls ran more slowly than boys. Ethnic group, asthma, and rurality were not significant predictors in these models. Conclusion: When examining the differences between proxy body fatness measurements and association with running performance an increase in waist to height ratio was associated with an increase in run-time550m, suggesting that increased abdominal fat volume was associated with reduced cardiorespiratory fitness in children. Additionally social deprivation level had a significant impact on cardiorespiratory fitness independent of body fatness or body size. The waist to height ratio and run-time550m are simple measures to use in children to assess risks of excess adiposity and poor physical fitness.

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  • The sustainability of tikanga practice and values within toi raranga

    McRae-Tarei, Jacqueline (2013-10-22)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This research project is made up of two distinct but related components; an exegesis and an artefact (whāriki). The art of whāriki weaving is distinctively Māori and is the legacy of an evolving traditional knowledge that spans the Pacific and the peopling of this vast region. The evidence clearly supports the theory that the art of toi rāranga (art of weaving) is clearly rooted in Polynesia. The theory and practice of whāriki weaving connects Māori philosophy and the practices of tikanga (Māori customs, obligations) to toi rāranga and the kairāranga (weaver). To link the ideology to practice requires a detailed explanation of all aspects of the weaving of an actual whāriki. Additionally the whāriki was designed as a koha to the University because this gesture is an integral aspect of the traditions associated with the weaving of whāriki. Most importantly underpinning the research is the importance of the preservation of a culturally viable living art form ensuring the sustainability of toi rāranga.

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  • How is Ngāpuhi art linked to tribal identity, beliefs and practices?

    Tewhata, Iritana Ngaro (2013-08-28)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Ngāpuhi knowledge is based on oral traditions passed down to successive generations, allowing for the transmission of information to remain contextualised and localised within Ngāpuhi. This has provided grounds for Ngāpuhi to justify, explain, protect, direct and guide the dissemination of tribal knowledge to their audience. Ngāpuhi were able to modify and adapt according to the changing environments in that customary practices such as tā moko and whakairo maintained fundamental principles of tikanga. The Ngāpuhi proverb ‘Ngāpuhi- kōwhao -rau’ expresses hapū autonomy, with each of the hundred holes or kōwhao of a fishing net representing each hapū and the whole net Ngāpuhi. By casting the net out, the intention of this research is to advance thinking of Ngāpuhi art within the broader context to the research question: How is Ngāpuhi art linked to tribal identity, beliefs and practices. Accordingly this research endeavours to capture the rich and diverse cultural aspects of Ngāpuhi art as articulated by artists’ who identify themselves as Ngāpuhi. This is evident in the artefact/documentary of several Ngāpuhi artists’. This research comprises a written exegesis and a documentary. Each component complements the other. For further research in the form of mini-toanga (documentary) can be requested from AUT Library.

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  • Systematics and ecology of the New Zealand Mastigoteuthidae (Cephalopoda, Oegopsida)

    Braid, Heather Elizabeth (2013-10-24)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Mastigoteuthid squids are ecologically important, being prey to many apex predators, yet the diversity and systematics of the family remain poorly understood. Delicate by nature, they are often damaged during capture; this has led to a controversial and unstable taxonomy for this family. Recent reviews have accepted one or two genera, and eight to 17 species. A complete taxonomic review of the New Zealand mastigoteuthids is undertaken here first time. A morphological revision of New Zealand material was completed to identify and describe locally occurring species, and to re-evaluate the status of the genera in this family. Morphological examinations focused on both internal and external anatomy. A set of morphological characters have been identified to distinguish five genera: Mastigoteuthis [Mt.], Idioteuthis, Mastigopsis [Mp.], Echinoteuthis, and Magnoteuthis [Mg.]. Eight species were identified: Mt. dentata, Mt. psychrophila, Mt. sp. X, Mt. sp. Y, I. cordiformis, Mp. hjorti, Mg. sp. nov., and E. famelica. The Mastigoteuthidae now appears to be second most diverse squid family in New Zealand waters. Three mitochondrial genes (16S rRNA, 12S rRNA and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I [COI]) were analysed for eight different species, in order to assess the utility of DNA barcodes to differentiate between species and to test the morphological hypothesis for the division of the five genera. Genetic evidence was found that supports Mg. sp. nov. as a distinct species that has been previously misidentified as the morphologically similar species Mg. magna. Each species analysed herein exhibited unique mitochondrial DNA haplotypes for all genes, and the morphological distinction between the genera was strongly supported using a combined phylogeny with all genes. However, I. cordiformis grouped with the chiroteuthids. Of the three genes examined, the DNA barcode region shows the greatest divergence between species and should be used in future systematic work on the Mastigoteuthidae. Because most mastigoteuthid specimens are badly damaged, integrative taxonomy is especially important for this family. Unfortunately, most specimens are formalin fixed, rendering DNA extraction difficult or impossible. Therefore, some preliminary tests were conducted on DNA from formalin-fixed museum specimens. Two sequences were recovered out of eight specimens tested using a silica-gel column-based extraction, with critical-point-dried tissue and a DNA purification protocol. The third sequence was recovered using an alkaline lysis extraction, with non-critical-point-dried tissue and without DNA purification. The sequences that were recovered showed a close relationship between Mt. agassizii, Mt. dentata, and Mt. sp. X. Idioteuthis cordiformis is the largest mastigoteuthid squid species and may currently be facing the potential of a local extinction in New Zealand; however, its ecology has not been previously studied. Therefore, stable isotopes 15N and 13C were analysed to find the trophic position and the source of carbon, respectively, and gut contents were examined using DNA barcoding. Stable isotopes revealed a correlation between δ15N and δ13C values, and I. cordiformis δ15N indicated that it occupies a high trophic position. Morphological analysis was not successful in identifying prey items below class, while DNA barcoding was able to identify two prey species: snapper (Lutjanus sp.), and birdbeak dogfish (Deania calcea). Although a review of the systematics of the New Zealand Mastigoteuthidae has been completed, a full review of this family is still required; an integrative taxonomic approach will be essential because there is often low interspecific and high intraspecific morphological variation. This will require continued collection efforts for new specimens, along with further research into DNA extraction from formalin-fixed tissue. In addition, future studies should also focus on the dietary habits and trophic position of mastigoteuthids in order to better understand their ecological importance.

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  • The familiar and unknown

    Wills, Janelle (2013-11-25)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This practice‐based project is an exploration of how sensations of ‘the Uncanny’ can be evoked through pictorial form. This has involved an in-depth investigation into the signification of the subject matter I employ, along with its means of description via an examination of the conceptual and applied characteristics of photography and the medium of paint. Through the transaction between photographic reality (as documented through the ‘objective’ camera lens) and the visceral effects of painted expression, I disrupt what is familiar with what is unknown. I create work which activates an atmosphere where something has happened, will happen or is happening quietly and unseen, an atmosphere implied by a residual mood or echo that resonates from what is missing. Through sensitively cropped representations of landscape and suburban scenes my work activates a concept of absence via signs of human activity. The mundane subject matter of my paintings - clotheslines, rubbish bins, backyards - abandoned by their occupants, appear populated instead by emptiness, stillness and silence. I am interested in drawing the viewer in through the everyday and the known, whilst simultaneously employing the same banal imagery to create a sinister undertone that interrupt certainty and comfort, and alludes to something more ominous.

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  • Grafted scales - gardens of the other

    Lim, Kevin Kyujung (2013-11-13)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This exegesis aims to critically assay the Master’s research project Grafted Scales: Gardens of the Other. The design outcome for this project proposes a garden that promotes communication and heals a rift between two communities in their incommensurability and difference. The project has a focus on two judicially defined communities located in Wiri, a suburb of Manukau. The prisoners of The Auckland Region Women’s Corrections Facility (ARWCF) and residents in the environs or milieu of ARWCF are targeted in their entangled being-in-common, in order to disrupt their varied boundaries and assumptions. The project seeks ways of bringing to visibility their belonged communities as a being-in-common without identity and with lessened conflict, while an openness of relations to the Other finds support. Gardens of the Other is focused on interrogating qualifications of meaning and the meanings of qualities. Grafted Scales may be considered in terms of a fundamental or primordial relation that opens to visibility quantity and quality in their differing. Scale, the scalar as such, as ratio that binds incommensurate measures opens this play: the necessary conforming of design practices to scalar conventions but also the balancing acts we associate allegorically with justice itself and then the infections that contaminate the surfaces of plant growth. All three encounters with scale are in play with the otherness of the garden. The project seeks to disrupt the meaning of quality as qualification of meaning. It does so with recourse to an application of Derridean deconstruction opening the question of spatial and temporal qualification of design and the processes of meaning making to the undecidable as such as that which opens the question of decision and decisiveness. The rift between communities is neither overcome nor does it remain. The design project opens spatial design to the fundamental ambiguity of partitioning that joins in its separating and that makes the neighbour a fundamental condition of otherness.

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  • Church communication and constructions of the self: exploring identity & identification in church communication

    Nairn, Angelique Margarita (2013-11-05)

    Doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The purpose of this research was to examine the everyday communications of Christian religious organisations for evidence of intentional and unintentional construction of member identity (Cheney, 1983a). My interest in this research emerged when I observed what appeared to be a proliferation of church communications in New Zealand society. On the one hand, these everyday communications seemed designed to promote the church to its constituents. On the other hand, however, they were also embedded with messages that could deliberately and deliberatively limit the possible range of members’ self identities if they identified with the church. My research investigated the practices that churches adopted in connection with developing prototypical identities for members (Hogg & Terry, 2000). To that end, I established two overarching research questions: how do religious organisations use rhetorical tools to construct identities for current and potential members and produce identification and disidentification? And for what purpose(s) are such member identities constructed, mobilised and perpetuated? Rhetorical analysis proved particularly useful in answering these questions because of its capacity to reveal attempts to influence peoples’ attitudes and behaviours. I found Cheney’s (1983a) rhetorical identification typology, with its textual focus and wide application fit my needs for detecting both overt and subtle attempts at encouraging members to identify with their church. At its core, the typology is comprised of four strategies: the common ground technique, identification through antithesis, the ‘transcendent we’ and unifying symbols. In my analysis, I found that, although the strategies presented across the texts some more than others their incorporation could, in fact, produce both identification and disidentification, depending on how the members decoded the messages. If identification inducement was successful, it could lead members to adopt the preferred decisional premises of the organisation into their self concepts (Tompkins & Cheney, 1985), ultimately subordinating members to the control of the church. Another of my research findings was that the churches had one prevailing motivation for encouraging identification: altruism. Such a motivation was not entirely unexpected, given that, central to Christianity, is the need for members to go forth and do good (Chaves & Tsitsos, 2001), which will not only earn them an eventual place in heaven (Irons, 1996), but in the interim, will meet members’ needs for self worth and self esteem (Pffefer & Fong, 2005). Yet underneath this motivation, was a much more ‘church centric’ reason for binding members to the church: survival. In a secular society, such as New Zealand (Koilg, 2000), where religion is declining and denominations compete among themselves for memberships (Lambert, 1999; Melton, 1998), the need to establish a societal presence to survive was likely unavoidable. The need to survive perhaps accounts for the growing shift of churches to adopt secular communication channels in order to target their messages at current and potential members. In conclusion, my research found that churches would establish prototypical characteristics (Hogg & Terry, 2000) for members by incorporating rhetorical practices, which could be beneficial to members, but which were certainly worthwhile to the church.

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  • The compulcelebrity effect: upmarket chef proprietors and compulsory celebrity

    Wright, Scott Douglas

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Using an inductive grounded theory methodology this research, congruent to grounded theories’ intent, presents the development of a substantive theory of compulcelebrity. Coined by the author, the term ‘compulcelebrity’ is the compulsory acquisition of celebrity by individuals who, through entry and exposure to the conditions within their environment, become compelled to attain celebrity status. In the case of this research, the environment in question is that of upmarket chef proprietors (UCPs). Compulcelebrity was evident within the environment of UCPs as research participants discussed their actions, understandings and feelings as they denied their celebrity, admitted their celebrity, desired celebrity, used their knowledge to generate celebrity, arranged media participation at their opening events, admitted a financial need for celebrity, accepted the rewards of celebrity and, through the integration of celebrity duties into their everyday life, accepted and reinforced a celebrity norm. Compulcelebrity derived from, and was illuminated by, research participants’ own descriptions of UCPs in situ, their celebrification, and of their celebrity as a fait accompli. Research participants discussed compulcelebrity predominantly through the narrative identifier of ‘chef’. Thus, although UCPs acknowledged the need for synthesis between their celebrity activities and their restaurants, it was through their identity as chefs, and the culinary content they could provide, that they felt the media was interested in them. The interest from the media in UCPs further reinforced the connection between themselves, the media, the celebrity chef phenomena, and the celebrity industry. Furthermore, public interest in culinary content has created a demand for UCPs as celebrity figures which, in conjunction with their need for visibility and the media’s demand for legitimate content, has resulted in UCPs’ exposure to compulcelebrity.

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  • ‘Sandcastles’ & ‘The Postmodern Rules For Family Living’

    Fee, Roderick Harold (2009-11-15T23:21:24Z)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The exegesis accompanies a thesis, the latter being the portfolio of work consisting of two parts, each being a completed first draft of a novel written during the Masters of Creative Writing course: Part 1: ‘Sandcastles’ - a 'closed' text novel Part 2: ‘The Postmodern Rules For Family Living’ - an 'open' text novel These two works are separately bound with a thesis cover sheet and numbered. The exegesis covers the writer’s motivation for writing these works, reflections on the course of development and changes in thinking that occurred during research and the act of writing. It shows the changing perspectives of the writer’s two thesis works in context and in contra-distinction to each other. It includes the writer’s academic and creative goals as they developed and the result achieved in terms of those goals. It highlights the writer’s developing interest in literary theory including suggesting an ephemeral adjunct to Reader-Response theory which is described as 'Collapse'. It shows the development of the writer’s deep interest in reality in fiction versus the lie in fiction and in the differences between writing and reading a creative work produced primarily for entertainment versus work of a literary nature, identifying some of the differences in features the writer has perceived.

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  • Microwave sensing for non-destructive evaluation of anisotropic materials with application in wood industry

    Bogosanovic, Mirjana (2012-11-30)

    Doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Microwave non-destructive testing of wood is an active research field, but, despite remarkable advances reported in the literature to date, the wood testing devices are not widely implemented in industry. This thesis aims to progress the knowledge on wood testing by investigating two of the key issues: microwave propagation through dried wood and sensor design. Two microwave antennas with focused beam are designed and implemented. First antenna is a commonly used horn with a dielectric lens, offering a broadband solution, operating over the 8 to 12.4 GHz frequency band. The second solution is a novel metal plate lens antenna with beam forming in the near field zone. A successful beam forming and focusing is achieved, but a narrowband characteristic prevented application of this sensor for microwave wood testing considered in this thesis. A microwave system for a free-space measurement of wood properties is, in its various forms, applied to measurement of wood properties, considering wood as an anisotropic, heterogeneous and multiphase dielectric. Microwave free-space transmission measurement methods are considered, analysing error sources and available mitigation techniques. A focused-beam transmission measurement setup with free-space calibration has been identified as an optimum solution for microwave wood testing. The properties of this measurement system are analysed, having in mind its application for wood measurement in industrial environment. The samples for the study are carefully chosen to cover a range of features frequently met in practice. The ‘actual’ sample properties, against which the performance microwave measurements are judged, are determined using visual inspection and CT scan. The theoretical background on electromagnetic wave propagation through anisotropic media is considered. Of particular interest is depolarisation of a linear plane wave in anisotropic media, which is also demonstrated experimentally. A simple case of grain inclination in a plane is considered first, demonstrating experimentally that grain inclination directly relates to the level of depolarisation. This is then applied to a general case, in which the grain is inclined in three-dimensional space. It is shown that the technique has a good correlation with visually inspected grain angle values, but additional sensor calibration is recommended. Heterogeneity of the sample is analysed using the same set of sensors, but in different arrangement. The aim was to detect variations in wood structure and investigate a method for automated categorisation of wood samples, based on the type of defect. The categorisation of samples is considered as a way to combat a great variability in sample properties and allow easier and more accurate empirical modelling. The microwave transmission measurement data are compared with CT scans and visual inspection of samples. Good results are achieved, not only for samples with distinctive defects such as knots, but for samples with needle flecks, resin pockets and change in annual ring arrangement along the axial direction. Heterogeneity study is then extended to include an analysis of effects which gradual variations in wood structure have on the measured microwave signal. The obtained results show that phase of the microwave transmission coefficient can be used as a good indicator of slow variation in sample density. The study also includes an analysis of free space calibration and broadband transmission measurement, investigating its positive sides such as improved accuracy, as well as its negative sides such as complexity which these procedures introduce in an industrial process. Techniques for combating residual error are investigated, offering the frequency averaging as an easily implemented option. The importance of working over a frequency bandwidth is demonstrated, for dealing with phase periodicity as well as combating measurement uncertainty. Response calibration is considered as an affordable option which can remove some of the systematic errors, yet is less disruptive for the industrial process. Furthermore, both moisture content and density distribution are considered, as well as bulk properties, averaged over the whole sample volume. It has been demonstrated that both moisture and density of wood contribute to the changes in microwave transmission coefficient. Measured data reveal a polarisation dependence of the moisture related transmission magnitude, which may be used as additional information in attempt to distinguish between the contributors. This was further investigated on the set of samples observed at several moisture content values. The correlation between bulk density and microwave measured density improves when samples with knots are omitted, demonstrating advantage of sample categorisation. In the final section of the thesis, the scattering experiment is performed, measuring the transmission through the wood when transmitting and the receiving antenna axes are at the right angle. This experiment shows that maximum transmission in this direction correlates best with the arrangement of annual rings in the sample, indicating possible existence of guided modes in the layered media. This finding is significant as it demonstrates the complexity of microwave propagation model for the sample with such complex structure.

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  • A study of the impact of people movement on Wi-Fi link throughput using propagation measurements

    Mussa, Osman (2012-11-15)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    There has been a tremendous growth in the deployment of Wi-Fi networks (i.e. IEEE 802.11 networks) in recent years. This growth is due to the flexibility, low cost, simplicity, and user mobility offered by the technology. While various key performance limiting factors of Wi-Fi networks such as wireless protocols, radio propagation environment and signal interference have been studied by many network researchers, the effect of people movement on Wi-Fi throughput performance has not fully been explored yet. This research aims to investigate the impact of people movement on Wi-Fi link throughput in indoor environments. Setting up experimental scenarios by using a pair of wireless laptops to file share where there is human movement between the two nodes, Wi-Fi link throughput is measured in an obstructed office block, laboratory, library, and suburban residential home environments. The collected data from experimental study showed that the performance difference between fixed and random human movement had an overall average of 2.21 ±0.07Mbps. Empirical results have shown that the impact of people movement (fixed and random people movements) on Wi-Fi link throughput is insignificant.

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  • Aspire: a creative exploration of the short, lyrical documentary

    De Guzman, Joseph (2014-01-06)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This practice-led research project creatively considers the potential of the short lyrical documentary. In so doing, the Thesis examines the nature of a specific genre of Asian television advertising and creatively applies it to a distinct form of narrative social portraiture. The practical component of the thesis is concerned with the design, direction and realisation of two short, lyrical documentary portraits that explore the theme of aspiration.

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  • Menopause in psychotherapy: a thematic analysis

    Hinton, Margot (2013-11-22)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Menopause is the natural and unavoidable ending of a woman’s procreative capability. An inter-play of biological, psychological, social and cultural influences is thought to shape each woman’s understanding and experience of menopause. There are relatively few psychotherapeutic studies on menopause in comparison to other significant life transitions, and even fewer that address what happens in therapy between the client and therapist when either or both are transitioning through menopause. This study examines menopause in the context of psychotherapy. A thematic analysis of eleven pieces of data, i.e. literature, revealed five themes of; silence; loss and fear of loss; challenges of relational interplay; disentangling of tensions; and renewed sense of self – and the core conceptual theme of impotency/potency. The discussion of the findings highlighted the relevance of menopause as a topic for therapeutic exploration, and synthesizes for clinicians understandings of how menopause may manifest in psychotherapy. The discussion also describes matters that may need to be considered and worked through when either a menopausal client and/or a menopausal therapist are engaged in a therapeutic relationship and how menopause might influence the psychotherapy.

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