580 results for Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

  • Students’ perceptions of work quality in a cooperative learning environment

    Lopez, M.; Lopez, D. (2013)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This study investigates students’ perceptions of their own work and that of others, and how these change as students work cooperatively in small groups in an active learning environment. We incorporated formal feedback into a learning cycle in which students researched topics and presented their findings to peers in small groups. We then used custom computer software to capture this feedback and students’ perceptions of the work and record these in a database. We then analysed these data to investigate students’ perception of the quality of the work, its usefulness, and the extent to which they trusted the accuracy of its findings. We found that student self-assessment and peer assessment were similar and both were relatively lenient compared to a tutor assessment. However, students with higher achievement were more severe in their self-assessment than those at lower achievement levels. We also found that perceptions did not change as the course progressed. This last finding was surprising and suggests that the students were not reflecting on the feedback they received and then acting on it to modify their approach to future research.

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  • A Māori approach to management: Contrasting traditional and modern Māori management practices in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Mika, J.P.; O'Sullivan, J.G. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This is a conceptual article located in the discourses of indigeneity, post-colonialism and critical management studies in which we seek to renew interest in Māori management as a distinctive form of management within Aotearoa New Zealand. We discuss defining Māori management and Māori organisations and their relevance for today's organsiations in New Zealand and internationally. We examine differences and similarities between Western and Māori management in terms of the four functions of management adapted from principles first proposed by Fayol in 1949. We propose a theoretical model of Māori management and discuss the implications of Māori management for management research, policy and practice.

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  • Supporting New Zealand graduate midwives to stay in the profession: An evaluation of the Midwifery First Year of Practice programme

    Dixon,L; Calvert,S; Tumilty, E; Kensington, M; Gray, E; Campbell, N; Lennox, S; Pairman, S (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background: the transition from undergraduate midwifery student to working as a confident midwife can be challenging for many newly qualified midwives. Supporting a smooth transition may have a positive impact on the confidence and retention of the new graduates with in the workforce. In New Zealand the Midwifery First Year of Practice programme (MFYP) was introduced in 2007 as a structured programme of support for new graduate midwives for the whole of their first year of practice.The main components of the programme include support during clinical practice, provision of a funded mentor midwife chosen by the new graduate midwife, financial assistance for education and a requirement to undertake aquality assessment and reflection process at the end of the first year. Aim: the aim of this study was to explore the retention of new graduates in midwifery practice following participation in the Midwifery First Year of Practice programme. Method: data was obtained from the register of MFYP participants between the years 2007 and 2010. This data was cross referenced with the Midwifery Council of New Zealand register and work force data for 2012. Findings: between the years 2007 and 2010 there were 441 midwives who graduated from a midwifery pre-registration education programme in New Zealand. Of these 415 participated in the MFYP programme. The majority were of New Zealand European ethnicity with 10% identifying as Māori. The mean age of participants reduced from 36.4 (SD 7.3) in 2007 to 33.4 (SD 8.1) in 2010. The overall retention rate for new graduate midwives who had participated in the MFYP programme was 86.3%, with 358 midwives still pracising in 2012. Conclusion: there is good retention of new graduate midwives within New Zealand and the MFYP programme would appear to support retention.

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  • www.useless.com: Crisis communications on shaky ground

    Vavasour, K (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    After the magnitude 6.3 earthquake that struck the city of Christchurch on February 22, 2011, the physical and communications infrastructure that many city dwellers rely on suddenly ceased to function. For many, this disruption to physical and virtual networks resulted in access to media, information, assistance and family being cut off or restricted in a number of different ways. Survey results show residents of the less-damaged suburbs made more use of television, websites and social media than those in badly damaged areas, who relied more on radio, word-­of-mouth, and print material. Social media and new technologies are now an established part of the crisis communications discourse; however, the infrastructure they rely on is not as solid and reliable as it may appear. After exploring the concept of blackboxing, the failures and weaknesses of previously backgrounded objects exposed by the earthquakes provide examples of its undoing (un-blackboxing). Quantitative and qualitative survey data is used to show how variations in location and disruption impacted on the information-­seeking of residents, and how the un-­blackboxing of infrastructure and socio-­technical networks left residents out of the loop. This research also challenges perceptions of how widely used, accessible and/or useful technologies like Twitter are to those in the middle of a disaster.

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  • Exploratory factor analysis of the clinical learning environment, Supervision and Nurses Teacher Scale (CLES+T)

    Watson, P.B.; Seaton, P.; Sims, D.; Jamieson, I.; Mountier, J.; Whittle, R.; Saarikoski, M. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background and Purpose: The Clinical Learning Environment, Supervision and Nurse Teacher (CLES1T) scale measures student nurses’ perceptions of clinical learning environments. This study evaluates the construct validity and internal reliability of the CLES1T in hospital settings in New Zealand. Comparisons are made between New Zealand and Finnish data. Methods: The CLES1T scale was completed by 416 Bachelor of Nursing students following hospital clinical placements between October 2008 and December 2009. Construct validity and internal reliability were assessed using exploratory factor analysis and Cronbach’s alpha. Results: Exploratory factor analysis supports 4 factors. Cronbach’s alpha ranged from .82 to .93. All items except 1 loaded on the same factors found in unpublished Finnish data. The first factor combined 2 previous components from the published Finnish component analysis and was renamed: connecting with, and learning in, communities of clinical practice. The remaining 3 factors (Nurse teacher, Supervisory relationship, and Leadership style of the manager) corresponded to previous components and their conceptualizations. Conclusion: The CLES1T has good internal reliability and a consistent factor structure across samples. The consistency across international samples supports faculties and hospitals using the CLES1T to benchmark the quality of clinical learning environments provided to students.

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  • Skeletal muscle fat metabolism after exercise in humans: influence of fat availability

    Kimber, N.E.; Camerson-Smith, D.; McGee, S.L.; Hargreaves, M. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The mechanisms facilitating increased skeletal muscle fat oxidation following prolonged, strenuous exercise remain poorly defined. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of plasma free fatty acid (FFA) availability on intramuscular malonyl-CoA concentration and the regulation of whole-body fat metabolism during a 6-h postexercise recovery period. Eight endurance-trained men performed three trials, consisting of 1.5 h high-intensity and exhaustive exercise, followed by infusion of saline, saline + nicotinic acid (NA; low FFA), or Intralipid and heparin [high FFA (HFA)]. Muscle biopsies were obtained at the end of exercise (0 h) and at 3 and 6 h in recovery. Ingestion of NA suppressed the postexercise plasma FFA concentration throughout recovery (P < 0.01), except at 4 h. The alteration of the availability of plasma FFA during recovery induced a significant increase in whole-body fat oxidation during the 6-h period for HFA (52.2 ± 4.8 g) relative to NA (38.4 ± 3.1 g; P < 0.05); however, this response was unrelated to changes in skeletal muscle malonyl-CoA and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC)β phosphorylation, suggesting mechanisms other than phosphorylation-mediated changes in ACC activity may have a role in regulating fat metabolism in human skeletal muscle during postexercise recovery. Despite marked changes in plasma FFA availability, no significant changes in intramuscular triglyceride concentrations were detected. These data suggest that the regulation of postexercise skeletal muscle fat oxidation in humans involves factors other than the 5′AMP-activated protein kinase-ACCβ-malonyl-CoA signaling pathway, although malonyl-CoA-mediated regulation cannot be excluded completely in the acute recovery period.

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  • Pancreatic stone and treatment using ERCP and ESWL procedures: a case study and review

    Hayes, J.; Ding, S. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Introduction Pancreatic duct stones are found in 22 to 60% of patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). The stones can lead to obstruction of the outflow of pancreatic secretions causing increased intraductal pressure. The pancreas is relatively noncompliant. Therefore the rise in intraductal pressure can induce tissue hypertension and ischemia. This can be a major factor causing pain in patients with CP. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that symptoms may improve following pancreatic duct drainage. Case presentation: A 62-year-old woman presented with persistent epigastric pain. Investigations revealed calcifications within the main pancreatic duct and head of the gland. Treatment with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) achieved a good outcome. Conclusion: Standard endoscopic removal of the stones proved impossible so treatment with ESWL was undertaken. Following fragmentation, the calculi and fragments passed spontaneously or were removed endoscopically. If pancreatic stones cannot be removed endoscopically, ESWL should be considered prior to surgery.

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  • Survey of evidence-based practice use and understanding among final (5th) year medical students in South-East Asia

    Martis, R.; Ho, J.; Crowther, C. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The SEA-ORCHID project (South East Asia - Optimising Reproductive Child Health in Developing countries) initiated a survey among undergraduate medical students at five South-East Asia universities to ascertain their understanding of evidence-based practice, information seeking practices, access to Information Technology and evidencebased databases as well as their understanding of clinical practice guidelines. The survey took place during August to December 2006 and was completed by 172 fifth year undergraduate medical students. The findings from this survey indicate that fifth year undergraduate medical students from the participating five South East Asian universities need to be well equipped in knowing what databases exist, how to search these and how to critically appraise the information obtained. This need, plus a lack of exposure to clinical practice guideline appraisal and development, highlights some of the issues medical students encounter when attempting to learn and practice evidence-based practice effectively.

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  • A new epizoic laelapid mite from the New Zealand sand scarab Pericoptus truncatus larvae and its isotopic ecology

    Clark, J. M. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A new genus Mumulaelaps (Mesostigmata: Laelapidae: Hypoaspidini) is proposed to hold large, pale, agile, gregarious mites associated with the larvae of the endemic xylophagous sand scarab Pericoptus. Mumulaelaps ammochostos sp. n. is described and illustrated as its type species from P. truncatus (Fabricius) from Southshore, Christchurch, New Zealand. The new genus bears a novel mix of characters shared with Hypoaspis G. Canestrini, 1884 and Coleolaelaps Berlese, 1914 but differs from both by having, in both sexes, stout terminal spines al1 and pl1 on legs II IV and bearing long or macrosetae of the dorsal series on femora and genua of legs IIIV. Both sexes have leg IV longest and leg II shortest with III never longer than I. The posterior edge of the sternal shield is deeply concave; the post anal seta is longer than the paranals; the hypostomal seta h3 clearly longer than h1 or h2. Stable isotopic (13C/12C; 15N/14N) analysis showed that the new species is not parasitic, but its trophic association with P. truncatus is unclear. It may feed on the hypopodes of Sancassania (Caloglyphus) or nematodes associated with P. truncatus.

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  • A new sub-alpine mite from New Zealand (Acari: Astigmatina: Histiostomatidae)

    Clark, J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The female, male, tritonymph and hypopus of Histiostoma montanum new species is described and illustrated from the sub-alpine shrub Brachyglottis elaeagnifolia litter at 11001300 m, North Egmont, Mt Egmont, Taranaki, New Zealand.

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  • Celebrity, infamy, poker

    Austrin, T.; Farnsworth, J. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A celebrity world that receives surprisingly little attention is poker. Yet it’s one richly populated with its own celebrities and the celebration of success, both financial and reputational. Recently, there have been two new reasons to look at poker, and two questions that arise in the process. One reason was the release in March 2012 of a new documentary on poker, All-in: the poker movie, narrated by Hollywood star Matt Damon. The other was poker’s Black Friday on 15 April 2011, when US regulators closed down its biggest online-gambling sites, charging three major poker sites with bank fraud, illegal gambling and extensive money laundering.

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  • Strength and conditioning practices in rowing

    Gee, T.; Olsen, P.; Berger, N.; Golby, J.; Thompson, K.G. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    There is limited published research on the practices of strength and conditioning (S &C) coaches in Great Britain. Information about training program design would be useful in developing models of good practice and ecologically valid intervention studies. The aim of this research was to quantify the training practices of coaches responsible for the S&C of rowing athletes. A questionnaire was developed that consisted of 6 sections: (a) personal details, (b) physical testing, (c) strength and power development, (d) flexibility development, (e) unique aspects of the program, and (f) any further relevant comments regarding the athletes prescribed training program. Twenty-two rowing and 10 S&C coaches with an average of 10.5 ± 7.2 years' experience agreed to complete the questionnaire. Approximately, 34% coached rowers of Olympic standard, 34% coached national standard, 3% coached regional standard, 19% coached club standard, and 10% coached university standard rowers. All coaches agreed that strength training enhanced rowing performance and the majority (74%) indicated that athletes' strength trained 2-3 times a week. Almost all coaches (94%) reported their rowers performed strength training, with 81% using Olympic lifting, and 91% employing a periodized training model. The clean (63%) and squat (27%) were rated the most important prescribed exercises. Approximately 50% of coaches used plyometrics such as depth jumps, box drills, and standing jumps. Ninety-four percent indicated they conducted physical testing on their rowers, typically assessing cardiovascular endurance (80%), muscular power (70%), muscular strength (70%), and anaerobic capacity (57%). This research represents the only published survey to date on the S&C practices in rowing within Great Britain.

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  • Microbial carbon concentration in samples of seabird and non-seabirdforest soil: Implications for leaf litter cycling

    Hawke, D.J.; Vallance, J. R. (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The paucity of leaf litter in seabird forest is usually explained by litter burial in burrows, but burial byitself fails to address the processes controlling decomposition. We measured soil microbial C in samplesfrom a Westland petrel (Procellaria westlandica) colony both within and outside the breeding season,and compared the results with two non-seabird forests. From the few studies of seabird soil microbialC, we initially hypothesised a soil microbial C concentration sequence of occupied burrows > unoccupiedburrows > adjacent forest floor > non-seabird forest. Instead, the highest values came from non-seabirdforest, a pattern consistent with published meta-analyses on the effects of N addition. Within the colony,highest concentrations were in forest floor soil and there was no burrow occupation effect. However,seabird forest soil microbial C followed a strong inverse relationship with soil ı13C (r = −0.58; P < 0.001)as well as the expected relationship with total soil C (r = 0.75); the relationship with soil ı13C in non-seabird forest was not significant (P = 0.29). We propose that soil microbes in seabird forest repeatedlyprocess a single pool of increasingly refractory terrestrial soil C, facilitated by seabird guano priming oforganic matter mineralisation. In this context, the paucity of leaf litter in seabird forest can be seen asa consequence of microbial C limitation in a nutrient-saturated system, an explanation consistent withrecent theory.

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  • New erythraeids (Parasitengona) from recent glacial outwash, Southern Alps, New Zealand; Callidosoma, Momorangia, Grandjeanella, and Pukakia gen. nov.; with a description of the deutonymph of Callidosoma tiki

    Clark, J. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Callidosoma susanae sp. nov., Momorangia chambersi sp. nov., Grandjeanella macfarlanei sp. nov. and Pukakia aoraki gen. nov., sp. nov., are described from recent glacial outwash in a braided river bed, Southern Alps, New Zealand. Two species previously placed in Momorangia Southcott, 1972 are removed. Neomomorangia Fain and Santiago-Blay, 1993 stat. nov. from Brazil is given generic status, and a Kenyan species is moved to Charletonia Oudemans, 1910 as Charletonia gabini (Haitlinger 2004b) comb. nov. Grandjeanella emanueli Haitlinger, 2010, Grandjeanella londaensis Haitlinger, 2011 and Callidosoma matsumuratettix Tseng et al. 1976 are left as species inquirendae. Pussardia Southcott, 1961, Harpagella Southcott, 1996 and Pukakia gen. nov. are placed in Abrolophinae, Witte, 1995. New host records are given for Callidosoma tiki Southcott, 1972 and Momorangia jacksoni Southcott, 1972. The deutonymph of Callidosoma tiki is described.

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  • Going commercial: Navigating student radio in a deregulated media marketplace

    Reilly, B.; Farnsworth, J. (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article describes an unusual form of student instructional radio, which is organized to run as a fully commercial broadcaster. Drawing on the case of a New Zealand student station, Mode 96.1FM, we look at how it functions in a highly competitive commercial environment. The student-run station reformats itself every year and attempts to emulate the styles and success of much larger national and local commercial music stations. We investigate two aspects. First, the tensions this creates between commercial, industry and educational objectives. Second, how students become located within the commodified speech practices intrinsic to marketing and branding. We also discuss how the station attempts to reconcile these in terms of seeking out diverse listening publics.

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  • High intensity interval training in a real world setting: A randomized controlled feasibility study in overweight inactive adults, measuring change in maximal oxygen intake

    Lunt, H.; Draper, N.; Marshall, H.C.; Logan, F.J.; Hamlin, M.J.; Shearman, J.P.; Cotter, J.D.; Kimber, N.E.; Blackwell, G.; Frampton, C.M.A. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background: In research clinic settings, overweight adults undertaking HIIT (high intensity interval training) improve their fitness as effectively as those undertaking conventional walking programs but can do so within a shorter time spent exercising. We undertook a randomized controlled feasibility (pilot) study aimed at extending HIIT into a real world setting by recruiting overweight/obese, inactive adults into a group based activity program, held in a community park. Methods: Participants were allocated into one of three groups. The two interventions, aerobic interval training and maximal volitional interval training, were compared with an active control group undertaking walking based exercise. Supervised group sessions (36 per intervention) were held outdoors. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured using VO2max (maximal oxygen uptake, results expressed in ml/min/kg), before and after the 12 week interventions. Results: On ITT (intention to treat) analyses, baseline (N = 49) and exit (N = 39) _VVO2 was 25.364.5 and 25.363.9, respectively. Participant allocation and baseline/exit VO2max by group was as follows: Aerobic interval training N = 16, 24.264.8/25.664.8; maximal volitional interval training N = 16, 25.062.8/25.263.4; walking N = 17, 26.565.3/25.263.6. The post intervention change in VO2max was +1.01 in the aerobic interval training, 20.06 in the maximal volitional interval training and 21.03 in the walking subgroups. The aerobic interval training subgroup increased VO2max compared to walking (p = 0.03). The actual (observed, rather than prescribed) time spent exercising (minutes per week, ITT analysis) was 74 for aerobic interval training, 45 for maximal volitional interval training and 116 for walking (p = 0.001). On descriptive analysis, the walking subgroup had the fewest adverse events. Conclusions: In contrast to earlier studies, the improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness in a cohort of overweight/obese participants undertaking aerobic interval training in a real world setting was modest. The most likely reason for this finding relates to reduced adherence to the exercise program, when moving beyond the research clinic setting.

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  • Ayersacarus, an endemic mite genus from Zealandian seabird nest environments: revision, with four new species (Acari: Mesostigmata: Leptolaelapidae)

    Clark, J. M.; Hawke, D. J. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Four new species of Ayersacarus Hunter (Acari: Mesostigmata: Leptolaelapidae) are described: A. hurleyi sp. n. from Stephens I./Takapourewa (Cook Strait, New Zealand); A. forsteri sp. n. from Pitt I./Rangiauria, Chatham Is.; A. knoxi sp. n. from Snares Is./Tini Heke; and A. savilli sp. n. from Stewart I./Rakiura (New Zealand). Prestacarus gen. n. is proposed with Ayersacarus tilbrooki Hunter, 1967 from South Georgia as the type species. This restores Hunter's original 1964 conception of the genus and leaves Ayersacarus with nine species confined to Zealandia. A key to the females of all nine Ayersacarus species is included. All Ayersacarus and Prestacarus species are restricted to seabird nests and their immediate environs.

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  • The EU as a force to ‘Do good’: the EU’s wider influence on environmental matters

    Fini, M. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This research paper examines the capacity of the EU to exercise its influence in relation to environmental matters beyond its Member States. More specifically, this paper identifies that EU law and policy has the potential to influence environmental laws and business practices in New Zealand. Two hypotheses are put forward: first, that the EU can use its market force in such a way as to influence laws in third countries such as New Zealand - that is, relatively small countries seeking economies of scale and for whom the EU represents a valuable market. It is suggested that such influence can be observed in New Zealand through a spill-over effect in product standards for those goods exported to the EU and sold within New Zealand. Secondly, it is argued that the EU overcomes legal jurisdictional limits by relentlessly pursuing the adoption of its environmental policies and practices outside the EU through international consensus.

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  • Isotopic signatures (13C/12C; 15N/14N) of blue penguin burrow soil invertebrates: Carbon sources and trophic relationships

    Hawke, D.; Clark, J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Seabird burrows provide a soil environment for processing discards such as feathers and guano, hence constituting a primaryinterface between the sea and the land. This studyinvolved collection and culturing of soil invertebrates from three blue penguin (Eudyptula minor) burrows, and examined their 13C/12C and 15N/14N isotopic composition in relation to potential burrow resources (terrestrial plant litter, burrow soil, guano, blue penguin feathers). Two taxa (cerylonid beetles and small tineid moth larvae) had a depleted 13C/12C indicative of a level of dependence on C from terrestrial soil. Tineid moth larvae (Monopis crocicapitella and (or) M. ethelella) substantiallyincreased their 13C/12C enrichment during development, implying increasing dependence on marine C. Remaining taxa, both decomposers and predators, had 13C/12C intermediate between guano and feathers. Larval and emergent fleas had the most enriched 13C/12C, indicative of a greater dependence on feather C and the likelihood of co-processing with guano. Pseudoscorpions and histerid beetles had overlapping isotopic enrichments implying competition for prey, but were spatially separated in burrow soil. With their highly enriched 15N/14N and marine 13C/12C, larvae and protonymphs of the histiostomatid mite Myianoetus antipodus stood alone. Blue penguin burrows therefore support a diverse invertebrate fauna that incorporates terrestrial soil as well as varying proportions of the various blue penguin discards.

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  • Social exclusion and poverty: Translating social capital into accessible resources

    Boon, B.; Farnsworth, J. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article investigates the dynamic multi-dimensional processes through which the poor become excluded from social participation. Drawing on social capital literature, it traces how bridging and bonding capital do not always translate into expected levels of social participation. It does so by detailing research findings from low income focus groups undertaken in Dunedin, New Zealand. These describe the experiences of group members in attempting to manage connections around employment, their own broader social participation or the participation of their children. In each case, the study highlights the difficulties of translation they experienced: in particular, translating available bridging or bonding capital into useful social, cultural or economic resources which could mitigate their social exclusion or enable fuller social participation.

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