9 results for Lincoln University, Book item

  • Younger wine tourists : a study of generational differences in the cellar door experience

    Charters, S.; Fountain, J.

    Book item
    Lincoln University

    The importance for wineries of visitation to cellar doors is recognised by both the tourism and wine industries (O'Neill and Charters, 2000). The quality of cellar door service plays a central role in the tourist’s experience of a winery and in the emotional attachments a tourist develops for a brand, and by implication, the future purchase intentions of that tourist (Charters and O'Neill, 2001; Dodd and Bigotte, 1997; Nixon, 1999;). Understanding cellar door expectations and experiences from the point of view of the wine tourist is essential to allow wineries to establish this loyalty (O'Neill and Charter, 2000). This chapter reports on research which examined the perceptions and experience of visitors to winery cellar doors in one wine region of Western Australia. It particularly focused on the perspective of younger wine tourists, who for current purposes are defined as those that are members of the Generation X and Generation Y cohorts, and sought to compare their experience and expectations of winery cellar doors with those of older wine tourists.

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  • Tourism and ecosystem services in New Zealand

    Simmons, D. G.

    Book item
    Lincoln University

    Tourism is an important and growing economic activity in New Zealand. While promotional activities highlight New Zealand’s biodiversity and ‘clean green’ image under a 100% pure brand, relatively little is known of its draw on ecosystem functions and services. Preliminary analyses of the sector’s eco-efficiency highlight both the complexity of the sector and its relatively-polluting nature. Tourism is, however, a two-edged sword in that it also provides an economic initiative for the designation and management of protected natural areas. Given the size, activity volumes and growth trajectory of the sector, non-market and resource-use and efficiency evidence to support tourism policy and planning is now urgently required.

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  • 'Van tour' and 'Doing a Contiki": grand 'backpacker' tours of Europe

    Wilson, J.; Fisher, D.; Moore, K.

    Book item
    Lincoln University

    The need to research a wider geographic diversity of destinations and backpacker contexts has been recognised as an area of concern in backpacker studies (Richards & Wilson, 2004b). While a range of studies and market reports have variously addressed the ‘youth’ or the ‘student’ travel market, most have considered Europe as a source of outbound backpacker travellers and not as a destination per se. This chapter addresses backpacker tourism in Europe, an important destination for several reasons: first, Europe is where backpacker tourism originated; and second, European destinations continue to attract many thousands of backpackers. For decades there has been a tradition of young New Zealanders and Australians going to Britain and Europe on extended travel trips. In New Zealand such an experience is called the ‘OE’ (sometimes the ‘Big OE’), a trip of extended duration that usually involves living, working and travelling outside New Zealand for a number of years. Investigation of the OE offers a unique opportunity to trace some of the changes in backpacker travel over time as practised and experienced by a specific group (or nationality) of travellers. With its focus on Europe, an exploration of OE travel also adds to the geographic diversity of destinations studied. To understand the travel behaviour of any group, the contexts within which it occurs historical, temporal, global, social, cultural, institutional, spatial are important. In spite of political, social and institutional changes in tourism over time, OE travellers still follow the same routes and travel patterns they have for decades; yet in many ways their experiences have changed over time. This chapter explores these travel patterns and the changes within them, focusing on two iconic travel experiences of the OE, the ‘van tour’ and ‘doing a Contiki’.

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  • Targeted screening for microbial bioactivity

    Stewart, A.; Ohkura, M.; McLean, K.

    Book item
    Lincoln University

    High throughput screening technology has allowed significant advances to be made in the discovery of lead agents for use in the pharmaceutical and agrichemical industries. However, economic and practical constraints have limited the use of this technology in the identification of bioactive microbes targeted at crop pests and diseases. Smaller scale targeted screening programmes have generally provided greater success in identifying microbial bioactivity. This paper describes a strategy for targeted selection of bioactive Trichoderma spp. Isolates are selected for biological characteristics that best match the biocontrol blueprint developed for the target pathogen and are then put through a series of standardised bioassays. This strategy provides a rapid and cost-effective means of identifying biocontrol agents with commercial potential.

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  • Homogeneity of urban biotopes and similarity of landscape design language in former colonial cities

    Ignatieva, M.; Stewart, G.

    Book item
    Lincoln University

    Colonial cities have remarkable similarities in their urban biotopes and landscape designs. The similar urban planning principles, landscape architectural styles, urban construction, and planting designs have produced an array of urban habitats that are replicated around the globe. From urban lawns to hedges and vegetation in pavement cracks, compositional similarity in urban biotopes is probably not surprising. But now, new concepts in individual planting design language such as "plant signatures", "go wild" and "alternative" or "freedom lawns" in North America, the United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand are producing a new ecological and cultural identity.

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  • ‘Charm sells’: The role of a community action group in preserving a place image in Akaroa, New Zealand

    Fountain, J.

    Book item
    Lincoln University

    This chapter has shown that to focus on explicit ‘tourism policy’ and the economic processes of destination image formation and promotion is flawed. In the case of Akaroa, the preservation and strengthening of the destination’s historic appeal emerged out of a more general concern to preserve the built heritage and streetscape of the township. The insights presented here highlight the cultural and political nature of destination image formation and contestation and reveals that economic hegemony is not the only, or necessarily the most important, source of power in debates over the most appropriate destination image for a tourist destination. In the case of the ANTN, the cultural capital and linguistic ability of the organisation’s key spokepeople played a crucial role in the success of their campaign. It has highlighted also, however, the importance of the use of the rhetoric of tourism by the ANTN to ensure that their goals could be achieved, at a time when the district’s long term wellbeing was increasingly reliant on the visitor industry. While the motivation of the Akaroa National Treasure Network to see the built heritage of Akaroa preserved was not primarily tourist related, their activities and efforts have ensured that Akaroa’s built charm maintains a prominent position in the promotion of Akaroa as a tourist resort into the twentyfirst century.

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  • Alfalfa

    Moot, D.; Teixeira, E.; Brown, H.

    Book item
    Lincoln University

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  • Rodent control and island conservation

    Howald, G.; Ross, J. G.; Buckle, A. P.

    Book item
    Lincoln University

    The most numerous of the world's invasive species, rodent pests have a devastating impact on agriculture, food, health and the environment. In the last two decades, the science and practice of rodent control has faced new legislation on rodenticides, the pests' increasing resistance to chemical control and the impact on non-target species, bringing a new dimension to this updated 2nd edition and making essential reading for all those involved in rodent pest control, including researchers, conservationists, practitioners and public health specialists.

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  • Generation Y as wine tourists: their expectations and experiences at the winery cellar door

    Fountain, Joanna M.; Charters, S.

    Book item
    Lincoln University

    Wine tourism and research surrounding it has developed substantially over the last 15 years. The importance for wineries of visitation to cellar doors is recognised by both the tourism and wine industries (Carlsen and Charters, 2006; Mitchell and Hall, 2006) and the need to understand the expectations and experiences of wine tourists has driven much of the research that has been conducted. Ensuring a match between expectations and experience of the cellar door will affect not only the tourists‟ satisfaction with the experience but their emotional attachments to the brand and, by implication, their future purchase intentions (Dodd and Bigotte, 1997). It is important to note, however, that wine tourists are not a homogeneous grouping (Charters and Ali-Knight, 2002; Mitchell, Hall, and McIntosh, 2000), and the importance of understanding the differences between them is increasingly recognised. Anecdotal evidence suggests that Baby Boomers, particularly males, have been viewed as the typical, and perhaps most desirable, wine tourist in the past (Charters and O'Neill, 2000). This is due to a range of factors, including their role in driving the growth in wine consumption in the Anglophone world, their perceived level of wine knowledge and wine involvement and greater disposable income. However, it is now becoming clear that a younger generation of wine consumers and wine tourists need to be considered if the industry is to have a long-term future (Koerber, 2000). This will require an understanding of the relationship of Generation Y to the winery experience. To this end, this chapter explores the attitudes, expectations and behaviour of Generation Y at the winery cellar door. In particular, the focus is on their preferences regarding the interaction they seek with cellar door staff, their needs with regards to the type of education and/or information sought during a winery visit and their overall attitude to a winery experience. The chapter is based on fieldwork conducted in Swan Valley, Western Australia, Yarra Valley, Victoria, and Waipara Valley, New Zealand. It is worth noting that Generation Y has been defined in this chapter as those born between 1978 and 1994 (Sheahan, 2005).

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