2 results for Lincoln University, Unclassified

  • Quaternary geomorphology, stratigraphy, and paleoclimate of the central Southern Alps, South Island

    Almond, PC; Barrell, D; Hyatt, O; Rother, H; Shulmeister, J; Vandergoes, M

    Unclassified
    Lincoln University

    On our first day we leave Christchurch and travel inland to the eastern front range of the Southern Alps, venturing into the Rakaia valley. Here we will see spectacular examples of glacial landforms, glacial sedimentology, and post glacial valley modification. After leaving the Rakaia Valley we follow the foot of ranges southwards to the McKenzie Basin, a tectonic depression adjacent to the highest peaks in the Southern Alps. Twizel is our stop for the night. Day 2, we backtrack slightly and head up the southern flank of Lake Pukaki, one of the large finger lakes described above, to Mt Cook village, seeing glacial features ranging from Last Glacial Maximum to latest Holocene in age, as well as present-day glaciers. From Mt Cook village we retrace our steps to Twizel and continue south to the driest and most continental region of New Zealand, Central Otago. We stay on the shores of Lake Wanaka for the night of Day 2. Day 3 takes us from the dry climates of Central Otago to the wet, forest cloaked landscape of the West Coast via the Haast Pass over the Southern Alps. This day involves soils, Holocene coastal geomorphology, marine terraces and late glacial moraines. The day ends in the township of Franz Josef. Day 4 starts with a plane flight for those with the inclination or a trip up to see the Franz Josef glacier. Afterwards we travel to Okarito Bog, the site of a splendid pollen record spanning the complete last glacial cycle, then head north to Hokitika. On the way we stop to discuss last glacial maximum moraines in the Poerua valley, and the effects of a recent large landslide on the landscape and people of the valley. The area around Hokitika is the focus of the next day when we review the classic glacial geomorphology of the Hokitika-Taramakau systems. The final part of the day takes us to Punakaiki on the western flanks of the Paparoa Range. On day 6 we continue north, stopping briefly near Westport to discuss a well studied peat section on a marine terrace of Cape Foulwind, then head through the Buller Gorge to the Inangahua Valley. We then turn south again to re-cross the Southern Alps over the Lewis Pass. Our final stop of the tour before Christchurch is in the Hope Valley.

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  • Lamb carcass classification system based on computer vision. Part 2, Texture features and neural networks

    Chandraratne, M; Samarasinghe, S; Kulasiri, G; Frampton, C; Bickerstaffe, R

    Unclassified
    Lincoln University

    In this study, the ability of neural network models for lamb carcass classification was compared with a multivariate statistical technique with respect to the classification accuracy. The lamb carcass classification system is based on image and texture analyses. Digital images of lamb chops were used to calculate twelve image geometric variables. In addition, a set of ninety textural features was used to extract the textural information from the acquired images. Texture analysis is based on the grey level co-occurrence matrix method. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to reduce the dimensionality of feature spaces. Two feature sets were generated. These feature sets comprised of 14 principal component (PC) scores calculated from the original variables and 14 variables selected from the original set of variables. Both feature spaces were used for neural network and discriminant analysis. Several network configurations were tested and the classification accuracy of 93% was achieved from three-layer multilayer perceptron (MLP) network. Its performance was 14% better than that from the Discriminant function analysis (DFA). The study shows the predictive potential of combining neural networks with texture analysis for lamb grading.

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