317 results for Lincoln University, Working or discussion paper

  • Papers presented at the New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society (Inc.) eleventh Annual Conference : Tahuna Conference Centre, Nelson, August 2005

    Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    Published on behalf of the New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society by Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit, Lincoln University, [2005].

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  • Demand prospects for beef

    Philpott, B. P.

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    Paper contributed to New Zealand Institute of Agricultural Science Symposium New Zealand Beef Production, Processing and Marketing’: Hamilton, August 24-28th 1970.

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  • New Zealand, The Ten, and future market strategies

    McCarthy, Owen

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    Photocopied material - reissue of Canterbury Chamber of Commerce economic bulletin, no. 559, published 1972.

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  • Marketing of agricultural and horticultural products : selected examples, apples, barley, summerfruit, wool

    Nicholson, K. B.

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    This report provides insights into selected primary industries in New Zealand. The primary industries covered are apple, barley, summerfruit, and wool. Production, marketing, and organisation are examined, along with quality control and market trends.

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  • Existence advertising, price competition, and asymmetric market structure

    Eaton, B. C.; MacDonald, I. A.; Meriluoto, L.

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    We examine a two stage duopoly game in which firms advertise their existence to consumers in stage 1 and compete in prices in stage 2. Whenever the advertising technology generates positive overlap in customer bases the equilibrium for the stage 1 game is asymmetric in that one firm chooses to remain small in comparison to its competitor. For a specific random advertising technology we show that one firm will always be half as large as the other. No equilibrium in pure price strategies exists in the stage 2 game and as long as there is some overlap in customer bases the mixed strategy equilibrium is far from the Bertrand equilibrium.

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  • The impacts of the Thailand-Australia Free Trade Agreement and Thailand-New Zealand Closer Economic Partnership on Thailand dairy import prices

    Suriya, P.; Gan, C.; Hu, B.; Cohen, D.

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    This study investigates the impacts of the Thailand-Australia Free Trade Agreement (TAFTA) and Thailand-New Zealand Closer Economic Partnership (THNZCEP) on Thailand dairy import prices. The study employs an import price model to examine the effects of the Thailand tariff reduction for New Zealand and Australian dairy products on the prices of New Zealand and Australian dairy products.

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  • Papers presented at the New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society (Inc.) Fifth Annual Conference : "Public - v - private interests : the role of the state in agriculture" : incorporating the 23rd Annual Conference of the New Zealand Branch of the Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society (Inc.) : Blenheim Country Lodge, July 1998

    Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    Published on behalf of the New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society (Inc.)

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  • Formal collaboration amongst four tertiary education institutions to advance environmental sustainability.

    Merfield, C. N.

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    There is increasing awareness in the tertiary education sector in Australia and New Zealand that many of its activities are not environmentally sustainable and need to be changed. In most cases tertiary educational institutions (TEI) are working individually to address environmental sustainability (ES) while taking advantage of a range of information sources and networks, such as Australasian Campuses Towards Sustainability (ACTS) to help them achieve their ES aims. In the Canterbury region of New Zealand the four major TEIs have formed an official joint working group to address environmental sustainability on all their campuses. The Environmental Sustainability Working Group (ESWG) started in late 2003 as a grass roots network of staff and students who were interested in ES from the four institutions. The vision was to provide a forum for mutual support, sharing knowledge, information and experience, thereby resulting in faster implementation of ES initiatives at the member institutions. To give the group sufficient ‘authority’ to achieve its aims it was considered vital that the group be officially recognised by the institutions and have the support of senior management. This was achieved under the ‘umbrella’ organisation the Canterbury Tertiary Alliance (CTA) (www.cta.ac.nz). The CTA is a formal alliance between the University of Canterbury (UC), Lincoln University (LU), the Christchurch College of Education (CCE) and the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) and was formed in 2001. The aim of the CTA is “to ensure that Christchurch's four major providers develop tertiary education choices in Canterbury in a complementary way. This ensures cooperation in best practice, cost efficiencies, collegiality and ultimately benefits our students” (www.cta.ac.nz/news/cta1.pdf , examples of other CTA activities are joint purchasing initiatives for information technologies and libraries and reciprocal library borrowing rights). Terms of reference for the Environmental Sustainability Working Group (Figure 1) were endorsed by the CTA executive in June 2004. The CTA executive consists of the Vice Chancellors, Principal and Chief Executive of the member institutions and other senior managers. With this authority the ESWG moved on to develop it first major project: waste minimisation.

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  • Opening up to foreign competition : an analysis of Indian durable consumer goods industry

    Sanyal, A.; Patibandla, M.

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    We examine the most likely strategy of product differentiation by newly entering multinational firms when market reforms begin in a developing economy. We argue that incumbents in a non-contestable protected market do not have the usual advantages of an incumbent as in a standard sequential entry model of contestable markets. In this context we use a model of vertical product differentiation to argue that a new entrant will choose a higher quality product and a higher price given the income distribution profile brought in by the market reforms. We test the propositions empirically on the basis of firm level panel data for five Indian durable consumer goods industries.

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  • Dumping, protectionism and free trade

    Sheppard, R. L.; Atkins Catherine

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    This Discussion Paper addresses the issue of anti-dumping actions and presents an evaluation of such measures in the context of the intemational liberalisation of trade. It concerns the recent General Agreement on Trade and Tariffs (GATT) negotiations with respect to anti-dumping and countervailing duty actions and the use by New Zealand of such actions on behalf of New Zealand producers and manufacturers. The Paper presents a brief review of the theoretical basis for anti-dumping actions, examines the concept of discriminatory pricing, looks at the effect on the economy of anti-dumping actions and reviews a recent example of an anti-dumping action in New Zealand. It concludes by asserting that with rare exceptions, anti-dumping actions are protectionist, that countries have more to gain by accepting lower priced imports than by applying anti-dumping duties and that general economic welfare would be enhanced by redefining the basis for anti-dumping actions to include only those actions where predatory dumping is proven to be the reason for the lower than normal import prices. Research on the actual effects of anti-dumping actions in terms of the change in economic welfare is continuing.

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  • Papers presented at the New Zealand Branch, Australian Agricultural Economics Society seventeenth annual conference, University of Waikato, August 1992

    Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    Published on behalf of the New Zealand Branch of the Australian Agricultural Economics Society

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  • Economic evaluation of Matua prairie grass as a pasture species on Canterbury sheep farms

    Greer, Glen; Chamberlain, J. E.

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    Matua prairie grass could play a significant role on Canterbury pastoral farms as a perennial greenfeed. It should not be seen as a substitute for ryegrass/white clover pastures or for lucerne stands but rather as a complement to both. In its role as a perennial greenfeed crop, however, it competes directly with annual forage crops, cereal greenfeeds and specialist ryegrass greenfeeds. Although Matua has good winter growth potential its susceptibility to trampling and bruising at this time means that it should not be grazed during winter. Its role in the provision of winter feed lies in the fact that by using Matua in autumn during flushing and mating, it is possible to spell ryegrass pastures, allowing them to accumulate dry matter for winter consumption. Dry matter produced by Matua swards in winter may be consumed in early spring during lambing, while late spring production can be carried forward in to the summer. The rapid response to autumn rain achieved by Matua makes it a more reliable source of feed during flushing and mating than the ryegrass/white clover system. Matua will not replace lucerne as a drought resistant plant in Canterbury conditions, but will respond to any application of moisture better than ryegrasses. Because Matua must be spelled between grazings until the plant has regrown to at least 15 centimetres high, and should not be grazed during winter it must be grown in conjunction with ryegrass-based pastures which contribute flexibility to the grazing system. Trials have been successfully conducted in which 50 per cent of the farm area is sown in Matua but local farm advisors believe that 30 per cent is a more suitable proportion. At that level the grazing system is sufficiently flexible to cope with Canterbury drought conditions and there is sufficient Matua to provide useful quantities of high quality greenfeed at critical periods of the year. On fertile soils a farming system with up to 50 per cent Matua-based pastures has been shown to be more profitable than a system based on ryegrass pastures only. There is also some evidence which suggests that a system incorporating Matua is economically superior on less fertile soils but this has yet to be proved.

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  • Is livestock a sunset industry?

    Lattimore Ralph, G.

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    A great deal of attention has been focused in recent years on ethical and health issues regarding the supply and demand for livestock products. The issues raised in this discussion paper range from animal welfare rights on the supply side to ethical and health issues on the demand side. Some people are concerned with the health risks associated with livestock product consumption. Others, like Godlovich (1997), can cogently argue a case that the production and consumption of lifestock animal product is a moral progress issue. Such views are strongly at variance with a number of contrasting trends in the world market for animal products and this paper is designed to try to elucidate the basis for these counter views.

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  • Maori fishing rights in New Zealand : an economic perspective

    Sandrey, R. A.

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    The present call for recognition of Maori fishing rights is based on the Treaty of Waitangi. Similarities between the Maori rights and recent developments with North American Indian fishing rights are presented and discussed. Traditional Maori fishing and cultural values are discussed and a current Maori position outlined. Economic efficiency issues are examined, and the conclusion is reached that a change to more Maori ownership of fishing rights is unlikely to compromise economic efficiency. Issues arise in trying to value different cultural beliefs between two groups in society, but these differences can be accommodated within an economic model. The major issue is an equity concern, and the debate should concentrate on equity and the legal and moral ramifications of the Treaty of Waitangi.

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  • Papers presented at the New Zealand Branch, Australian Agricultural Economics Society Conference, Blenheim, July 1987

    Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    The themes for the 1987 Conference of the New Zealand Branch of the Australian Agricultural Economics Society were Future Fiscal Directions, Trade Negotiation, and State Owned Enterprises. This discussion paper includes the full text of the following papers: R.L. Kerr, Future Fiscal Directions - Stabilisation and Adjustment: What Have We Learned? ; Gary Banks, Trade Negotiation - The Role of Government in Multilateral Trade Negotiations; Colin Hicks, State Owned Enterprises: Corporatisation A Massive Hoax; R.G. Ansell and S.K. Martin, Market Diversification And Risk In New Zealand Export Lamb Markets; Y.S. Chiao, Sheep Plan and User Pays; D. de B. Galwey and P. J. O'Neil, Risk Balancing: A Preliminary Empirical Analysis for The New Zealand Sheep and Beef Sector; Veronica A. Jardine, Funding and Conduct of Agricultural R & D in New Zealand; K.L. Leathers, Sustainable Agriculture In Theory And In Practice; A.T.G. Mcarthur, Economic Weights For Breeding Objectives; O. Negendank, The Role of Advisory Services in an Agricultural Marketing Strategy; John Pryde, Rural Finance in New Zealand; Allan N. Rae, Analysis of Aspects of the United Kingdom Import Apple Market in the Post EEC Membership Period; Tony Rayner and Ralph Lattimore, The Phasing of Trade Liberalization Policy: The New Zealand Experience; J.C. Robertson, G.R. Griffith, R.G. Lattimore, An Econometric Model of New Zealand Milk Production and Utilisation; Brian S. Speirs and Andrew N. Burtt, Information for Agricultural Adjustment; S. Sriramaratnam, Feasibility of Insurance as a Risk Management Option in New Zealand Agriculture; Bruce A. Weber and Walter B. Moore, Incidence of Tax Reform by Income Groups.

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  • The EEC sheepmeat regime : one year on

    Blyth, N.

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    The EEC Sheepmeat Regime was introduced in October 1980, in order to establish a common market in sheepmeats within the Community. During the first year (1980/81) higher support prices led to increased supply in Britain whilst the imposition of a Clawback tax and the strength of the sterling reduced exports from Britain. The British market was somewhat depressed for these and other reasons. Imports into the EEC from New Zealand were also considerably lower than the Voluntary Restraint Agreement (VRA) allows for, though returns from trade were higher, due to the reduction in the import tariff. Assessment of the Regime indicates that it is progressing satisfactorily, but at some high and increasing expense to the EEC (FEOGA) fund. The outlook to 1984/5 is for increased supply in most EEC countries, with a further small decline in consumption in Britain. Intra EEC trade will increase, but third country imports are likely to fall. There is some uncertainty surrounding these projections, especially on price movements, because of possible changes in the Regime and in the usual market forces. The EEC is likely therefore to remain a major but declining market for New Zealand unless efforts are made to fulfill the voluntary quota by expanding the continental market to offset the forecast decline in exports to Britain

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  • Internationalisation and the valuation of forest assets

    Bigsby, H. R.; Willemse, B.

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    The paper looks at the implications of internationalisation of forest ownership on forest valuation. With an increase in the international diversity of forest owners questions are raised about the effect that this has on the methods used to value forests and whether there are substantive differences due to the nationality of the owner. A survey of 30 commercial forest owners in New Zealand and 27 commercial forest owners in Australia was carried out. The survey looked at factors such as the legal structure of the owner, whether it was involved in only forest ownership or forest ownership and wood processing, countries in which forest are owned, main species, predominant age class distribution and target rotation age of forests, and valuation method currently used. The results show that there are substantial differences in how forests are valued in either country, but also that these differences to not appear to be linked to the nationality of the owner.

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  • Dairying in Japan and the benefits of adopting New Zealand pasture grazing techniques

    Moffitt, R. G.

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    This discussion paper describes the dairy farming situation, the changing domestic demand and the changes in imports of dairy products that Japan is experiencing. Some of the problems the dairy farming industry is facing are also mentioned. The paper suggests a method of overcoming these problems by encouraging Japan to adopt some of New Zealand's dairy farming pasture management techniques.

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  • Selling New Zealand products in Japan

    Moffitt, R. G.

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    This discussion paper has been prepared to provide some insight into the commercial and cultural differences which affect business negotiations with the Japanese. As a destination for New Zealand exports Japan has become increasingly important in recent years. In 1986 New Zealand sold $1.7 billion worth of goods to Japan. While over three quarters of this trade has been in the form of raw materials and primary products such as unwrought aluminium, forest and dairy products, fish, fruit, vegetables and wool, there is a steady expansion in the export of finished consumer goods. The rapid expansion of trade relations with Japan requires an increased understanding of not only the political and economic behaviour of Japan and the Japanese but also the ways of living, modes of thinking and other cultural differences of the people. It is hoped that the information and knowledge from this paper can be used to assist in developing marketing strategies for Japan.

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  • The state of agricultural credit in New Zealand

    Pryde, J. G.; Bain, L. B.

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    In this paper the subject of agricultural credit has been subdivided into three sections covering background, borrowing, and lending. The background covers some of the changes in the New Zealand economy and government policies which have affected both borrowers and lenders in the agricultural sector, and consequently the amount and form of credit used. The section on borrowing (Section 3) examines the present credit needs of farmers, in particular the apparent trends towards increased equity and greater difficulty in servicing debt. The lending section (Section 4) examines the roles of government and private lending institutions in the field of agricultural credit and changes in the amount and form of credit available.

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