2 results for Massey University, Moving image

  • Context matters : women's experiences of depression and of seeking professional help : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

    Batten, Jodie Anne (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Most existing research on women and depression takes a realist approach that effectively silences the voices of women and limits our understandings of depression. By engaging with the stories of seven women, recruited from a provincial New Zealand area, this research privileges women's voices. Taking a discourse analytic approach, this research explores how women construct their experiences of depression and of seeking professional help. I take a micro discursive approach in identifying how the women utilise various discursive resources in constructing their accounts of both depression and of seeking professional help. In order to locate these discursive resources within the broader socio-cultural environment, I employ a macro discursive approach drawing on Foucauldian discourse analysis and Davies and Harré’s Positioning Theory. Participant’s accounts of their depressive experiences change over the course of their journeys. I explore how the women's accounts shift from a contextualised explanatory framework that locates their experiences of depression within the gendered context of their lives, to a medicalised explanatory framework as they enter the professional help arena. This research offers insights into how dominant discursive construction of the ‘good’ woman/mother dovetail with a biomedical explanation of depression and prevailing discursive constructions around anti-depressant medications. Working together, these discourses effectively silence women's voices, both pathologising and decontextualising women's depressive experiences. Furthermore, I suggest that these dominant discursive resources and practices offer limited ways for women to make sense of their experiences in meaningful and empowering ways. A need for new understandings about women and depression is called for - one grounded in the material-discursive realities of women’s gendered lives.

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  • The effects of social isolation on cognition : social loneliness reduces cognitive performance in older adults : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirement for the degree of Master of Science in Psychology at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Whitehouse, Catherine (2013)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The present cross-sectional study examined the influence of social isolation on cognitive performance among older adults aged 65-84 years old. This study extended previous work on social isolation and cognition in two ways. While previous research has found a link between social isolation and cognition, few have examined the relationship between different forms of social isolation and different domains of cognition simultaneously. Secondly, a link between social loneliness and cognition has not been examined. Therefore, the current study examined the impact of four different types of social isolation (social loneliness, emotional loneliness, perceived social support and objective social isolation) on global cognition and cognitive domains (memory, fluency, language and visuospatial ability). The cross-sectional data from the New Zealand Longitudinal Study of Ageing (NZLSA) (2010) was used for analysis. The NZLSA study included questions about demographic information, mental and physical well-being, loneliness, social support, social networks and cognition. Using multiple regression analyses the influence of social isolation on cognitive functions was investigated. Results showed that various forms of social isolation may be differentially important for cognitive performance in the older adult, with social loneliness the only measure of social isolation that influences cognition. The results also suggested that if a form of social isolation affects cognition, the different cognitive domains such as global cognition, fluency, language and visuospatial ability respond in a similar pattern. Explanations of why social loneliness influences cognition is discussed. Limitations of the study and implications for future research, such as the need for a longitudinal study that simultaneously assesses the links between the various forms of social isolation and cognition, is also discussed.

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