8 results for Massey University, Scholarly text

  • Milk price cuts reflect the reality of sweeping changes in global dairy market

    Lockhart, J; Donaghy, DJ; Gow, H (2016-05-12)

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    Published

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  • Murray Goulburn and Fonterra are playing chicken with dairy farmers

    Lockhart, J; Donaghy, DJ; Gow, H (2016-05-23)

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    Published

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  • Untold Stories: Anglo-Indians in New Zealand

    Andrews, RA (2016-10-12)

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    Published online

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  • Open letter to The Independent - Pilots 'very likely' to misjudge flying conditions due to irrational decisions, revisited

    Perezgonzalez, JD (2016-12-22)

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    Staufenberg’s news article (2016) comments on research reported by Walmsley and Gilbey (2016). An interview with the corresponding author also yielded extra information, especially the verbalization that practically all pilots fell prey to cognitive biases and the hint that pilots were making irrational decisions.In reality, Walmsley and Gilbey’s own results do not support much of the conclusions posed. I have further expanded on information which is specific to Staufenberg’s news article, especially information about minima meteorological conditions for visual flight rules (VFR) flying in the UK, as well as a breakdown of the percentage of pilots in Walmsley and Gilbey’s study which contradicts the information provided.

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  • Failings in COPE's guidelines to editors, and recommendations for improvement.

    Perezgonzalez, JD

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    Letter highlighting failings in COPE's Guidelines to editors and proposing recommendations for improvement. The main recommendation is to create appropriate guidelines for dealing with fully disclosed (potential) conflicts of interest. COPE sought the topic as relevant and included a session on the topic as part of COPE's Forum (Feb 3, 2017; http://publicationethics.org/forum-discussion-topic-comments-please-7).

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  • Sorry to say, but pilots’ decisions were not irrational

    Perezgonzalez, JD (2016-12-16)

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    Fradera’s Digest (2016) makes for interesting reading both for aviators and cognitive psychologists alike. Fradera reports on a research article by Walmsley and Gilbey (2016) and the Digest seems pretty accurate to the contents commented upon (in a way, thus, whatever praises or criticisms are raised apply equally to the latter article). The Digest is interesting because what it says is quite relevant in principle but rather misleading in practice. That is, the actual results reported by Walmsley and Gilbey, do not seem to support the portrayal of pilots as biased and irrational, a portrayal which originates in the interpretation of those results based on a flawed statistical technique—null hypothesis significance testing, or NHST. In a nutshell, Fradera opted to summarize the interpretation of (some) outputs made by Walmsley and Gilbey instead of re-interpreting those outputs anew within the context of the methodology and the results described in the original article, as I shall argue.

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  • Statistical Sensitiveness for the Behavioral Sciences

    Perezgonzalez, JD (2017-02-14)

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    Research often necessitates of samples, yet obtaining large enough samples is not always possible. When it is, the researcher may use one of two methods for deciding upon the required sample size: rules-of-thumb, quick yet uncertain, and estimations for power, mathematically precise yet with the potential to overestimate or underestimate sample sizes when effect sizes are unknown. Misestimated sample sizes have negative repercussions in the form of increased costs, abandoned projects or abandoned publication of non-significant results. Here I describe a procedure for estimating sample sizes adequate for the testing approach which is most common in the behavioural, social, and biomedical sciences, that of Fisher’s tests of significance. The procedure focuses on a desired minimum effect size for the research at hand and finds the minimum sample size required for capturing such effect size as a statistically significant result. In a similar fashion than power analyses, sensitiveness analyses can also be extended to finding the minimum effect for a given sample size a priori as well as to calculating sensitiveness a posteriori. The article provides a full tutorial for carrying out a sensitiveness analysis, as well as empirical support via simulation.

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  • The fallacy of placing confidence in confidence intervals – A commentary

    Perezgonzalez, JD (2017-05-02)

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    ‘The fallacy of placing confidence in confidence intervals’ (Morey et al., 2016, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, doi: 10.3758/s13423-015-0947-8) delved into a much needed technical and philosophical dissertation regarding the differences between typical (mis)interpretations of frequentist confidence intervals and the typical correct interpretation of Bayesian credible intervals. My contribution here partly strengthens the authors’ argument, partly closes some gaps they left open, and concludes with a note of attention to the possibility that there may be distinctions without real practical differences in the ultimate use of estimation by intervals, namely when assuming a common ground of uninformative priors and intervals as ranges of values instead of as posterior distributions per se.

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