2,297 results for The University of Auckland Library, Conference item

  • On internal knowledge representation for programming mobile robots by demonstration

    Abbas, T; MacDonald, Bruce (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Intuitive learning of new behaviours is one of the important aspects of social robotics. Among various robot learning approaches, recently Programming by Demonstration (PbD) has gained significant recognition with a lot of potential. Internal representation of the knowledge is a key design choice in the learning process. Using machine learning techniques such as ANNs, HMMs and NARMAX models, simple skills can be encoded from raw sensory data. However, the abstract symbolic representations have demonstrated greater potential for learning complicated tasks but with less details and require a piece of prior knowledge as well. For a particular application, appropriate choice of the symbols is a key design issue. This paper discusses the choice of the symbols to build a PbD process for typical indoor navigation. The learning results are presented for a few tasks to demonstrate the potential of the proposed approach.

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  • Mathematical Outdoor Play: Toddler’s Experiences

    Lee, Annette (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Mathematics is a subject area that is generally understood and accepted as an important part of academic learning and therefore has an important part to play in the formal education of our children. However, in New Zealand there is no such formal requirement in early childhood education and therefore mathematics is an area often overlooked by early childhood teachers and parents. This paper reports a summary of the findings of a case study where observations of toddler’s outdoor play episodes showed evidence of mathematical knowledge and skill in unstructured play activity

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  • SAS Students’ First Year Experience

    Lee, MSK (2010-10-06)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Research conducted at the Australian universities on first year students found that students’ first year experience in campus is very important. It could impact on their academic performance and their decision to continue their study in the university. This project investigates the SAS’s first year students’ experience and trying to identify the factors that could impact on the students’ academic performance and their choice of continuing of the subject.

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  • Wideband dual polarized line feed development for a cylindrical reflector radio telescope

    Leung, Martin; Kot, JS; Jones, BB (2007-12-06)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    A new wideband dual polarized line feed element for a cylindrical reflector radio telescope has been presented. A novel feeding arrangement using microstrip baluns reduces element cost and losses compared to dual polarized dipole designs using hybrid coupler feeds. An 8-element line feed was simulated, constructed and measured for array radiation performance across a 1.57:1 frequency range, with good agreement between simulation and measurement. Beam equalization for both polarizations in the transverse plane was obtained using channels placed beside the elements. Cross-polar levels in the transverse plane patterns are shown to increase with scanning angle. Element patterns in the longitudinal plane, for both polarizations, show excellent polarization purity for wide scan angles. Implementation of the line feed at the MOST (Molonglo observatory synthesis telescope) will demonstrate a world first in polarimetric imaging using a cylindrical reflector radio telescope

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  • Dynamic Decision Making, Learning, and Mental Models

    Li, Anson; Maani, K (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Bounded by limited cognitive capabilities, decision-makers resort to using mental models (reduced versions of real world dynamics) for decision-making and interventions in complex tasks. Such mental models are constantly updated with new experience and knowledge acquired, facilitating a learning process. Through this learning process, mental models can be refined to better represent real world dynamics. Systems theory suggests that updates of mental models happen in continuous cycles involving conceptualisation, experimentation, and reflection (C-E-R), which closely resembles a dynamic decision-making process (DDM). This study investigates the learning process of decision-makers in DDM tasks. Participants involved in simulated environments (Management Flight Simulators and Microworlds) are observed, with proceedings of their DDM tasks recorded and analysed to trace and identify any patterns of learning. Updates of mental models are recognized in changes of their performance, and their perceptions towards performance indicators and systems behaviour, before and after the decision tasks. Findings of this study show significant changes in mental models after participation in DDM tasks. However, the level of learning is questionable.

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  • Sensor Analysis for Fault Detection in Tightly-Coupled Multi-Robot Team Tasks

    Li, Xingyan; Parker, L (2007)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper presents a sensor analysis based fault detection approach (which we call SAFDetection) that is used to monitor tightly-coupled multi-robot team tasks. Our approach aims at detecting both physical and logic faults of a robot system with little prior knowledge on the system. We do not need the motion model or a priori knowledge of the possible fault types of the monitored system. Our approach treats the monitored robot system as a black box, with only sensor data available. Thus, we believe the approach is general, and can be used in a wide variety of robot systems performing many different kinds of tasks. Our approach combines data clustering techniques with the generation of a probabilistic state diagram to model the normal operation of the multi-robot system. We have implemented this approach on a physical robot team. This paper presents the results of these experiments, which show that sensor data analyzed from a training phase of normal operation can be used to generate a model of normal robot team operation. This model can then be used to detect many types of abnormal behavior of the system, based purely on monitoring the sensor data of the system.

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  • Distributed Sensor Analysis for Fault Detection in Tightly-Coupled Multi-Robot Team Tasks

    Li, Xingyan; Parker, L (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper presents a distributed version of our previous work, called SAFDetection, which is a sensor analysisbased fault detection approach that is used to monitor tightlycoupled multi-robot team tasks. While the centralized version of SAFDetection was shown to be successful, a shortcoming of the approach is that it does not scale well to large team sizes. The distributed SAFDetection approach addresses this problem by adapting and distributing the approach across team members. Distributed SAFDetection has the same theoretic foundation as centralized SAFDetection, which maps selected robot sensor data to a robot state by using a clustering algorithm, and builds state transition diagrams to describe the normal behavior of the robot system. However, rather than processing multiple robots’ sensor data centralized on a server, distributed SAFDetection performs feature selection and clustering on individual robots to build the normal behavior model of an individual robot and the entire robot team. Fault detection is also accomplished in a distributed manner. We have implemented this distributed approach on a physical robot team and in simulation. This paper presents the results of these experiments, showing that distributed SAFDetection is an efficient approach to detect both local and interactive faults in tightly-coupled multi-robot team tasks. Compared to the centralized version, this approach provides more scalability and reliability

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  • The Use and Impact of Decision Support Systems in New Product Development

    Liew, Angela (2009)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This research study focuses on commercial firms that adopt a computerized Stage-Gate® decision support tool in their new product development process. The Stage-Gate® Product Innovation process is a well adopted and researched decision process in new product development. It is a structured and formalized process in which a variety of financial and nonfinancial information are captured and communicated to management to assist them in making decisions about the potential of new products. Given that the majority of a products cost are being determined at the product development phase, a series of decisions considering financial and non-financial information are usually made during the new product development process. Through case study research, this research investigates on how firms use decision support systems to assist them in their new product development decision process and evaluate the resulting impacts of the use of these systems in practice in the new product development context.

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  • Executing Management Control through Decision Technology

    Liew, Angela; Akroyd, C (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    When competition is tough and resources are scarce, management may seek ways to systematise their decision-making process so as to control their operations and resource allocations. Yet little is known about how decision technology is used as a means to administer managerial control. This research investigates how an organisation used decision technology to execute management control to manage the work activities of their employees in a group decision-making setting. It assesses the impact decision technology has had at the firm level focusing on the transformation of the formalised decision process and the individuals involved. The research is carried out using case study, where the data is collected from multiple sources including passive observations in board meetings and functional team meetings, and interviews with decision makers of different hierarchal levels. We found that the decision technology not only enabled management to execute management control vertically across different hierarchal levels but also horizontally over their fellow peers. We also learned that product development decisions that were previously avoided (due to fear of project failure) are now made. This is noted from the increased number of radical (for the firm) new products commercially launched.

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  • Incorporation of the basal pilin FctB into the pilus of Streptococcus pyogenes

    Linke, Christian; Young, Paul; Bunker, RD; Middleditch, TT; Caradoc-Davies, TT; Proft, Thomas; Baker, Edward (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Many pathogenic and commensal bacteria express pili, long hair-like protein polymers that enable adhesion to host tissues. The pili of Gram-positive bacteria are unique as they are assembled by specialised transpeptidases (sortases) through covalent linkages. In the common human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes, the major pilin FctA forms the polymeric pilus fibre, while the minor pilin Cpa is the adhesin found at the pilus tip. The pilus is anchored to the streptococcal cell wall through the basal pilin FctB. Here, we present the crystal structure of FctB at 1.9 Å resolution. It reveals an immunoglobulin (Ig)-like N-terminal domain with an extended proline-rich tail. Surprisingly, the Ig-like domain is structurally homologous to the N-terminal domain of the major pilin FctA. This led to the identification of a conserved lysine residue as the putative site of covalent linkage to the pilus assembly, which we confirmed by mass spectrometry analysis of complete S. pyogenes pili. The C-terminal tail FA1-MS12 Infection and Disease 26th European Crystallographic Meeting, ECM 26, Darmstadt, 2010 Acta Cryst. (2010). A66, Page s34 s34 forms a polyproline-II-like helix that seems to be a common feature of many Gram-positive cell-wall anchored virulence factors, and particularly of basal pilins. Together, we identified structural characteristics of pilins that direct their incorporation into the pilus polymer.

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  • Auditory processing of conspecific vocalisations in the auditory midbrain of the zebra finch

    Logerot, Priscilla; Wild, JM; Kubke, MF (2009-08-29)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The zebra finch is a songbird species of which the male needs to learn its vocalizations from a tutor that is usually the father. The song is biologically important for both reproduction and social interactions, making perception a key parameter in singing behaviour. It is not surprising, then, that brain nuclei involved in song production and perception have been intensively investigated in recent times. However, most of these studies have addressed the issues of song selectivity and auditory processing in the forebrain, while only a few studies have focused on earlier stages of the ascending auditory pathway. While it is known that some forebrain nuclei will respond specifically to either the bird’s own song or to conspecific vocalizations, where in the auditory pathway the emergence of this specificity originates remains unknown. However, since most auditory information reaching forebrain structures passes through the midbrain nucleus mesencephalicus lateralis, pars dorsalis (MLd), this nucleus is a prime candidate for early tuning to complex sounds, including conspecific signals. We have investigated the tuning properties of MLd neurons to either simple sounds such as white-noise and pure tones, or complex sounds, namely conspecific and heterospecific songs. Preliminary data show that neurons in MLd can be classified into two main categories: units that responded to all types of stimuli and units that showed a higher level of selectivity. These selective neurons could represent a first stage in the processing of complex song.

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  • Assessment of secondary students’ number strategies: The development of a written numeracy assessment tool

    Lomas, Gregor; Hughes, PG (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper examines the piloting of a Written Strategy Stage Assessment Tool designed to identify students’ “global” strategy stages (and provide formative data for teachers). The year 9 cohorts from two schools were assessed at the end of the school year. Numeracy experts then interviewed a sample, to identify each student’s strategy stage, using an oral assessment. Results from the written assessment gave relatively consistent measures of stages in terms of the criteria set and a relatively close match to national data. Comparison of the written and oral assessment results showed the stages identified by the two measures to be generally consistent.

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  • Simplified Expressions for Modelling Rigid Rocking Structures on Two-spring Foundations

    Ma, QT; Butterworth, John (2010-03)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper presents a new technique for modelling the dynamic response of uplifting rigid structures subjected to base excitation. The proposed technique exploits the use of a two-spring foundation, and subsequently an equivalent single-degree-offreedom procedure is established to model the dynamics of the system. A set of simplified closed-form expressions have been developed to estimate the system’s restoring forcedisplacement characteristics. The simplified expressions only require details of the system geometry and are shown to predict the nonlinear force-displacement characteristics of a rocking structure as closely as those determined from a complicated pushover analysis. This paper presents two additional numerical examples to demonstrate the use of the proposed technique to simulate the displacement time-histories of a prototype structure under free-vibration-decay or when subjected to earthquake excitations.

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  • Aortic Heamodynamics and Endothelial Gene Expression: An Animal Specific Approach

    Lim, YC; Long, David (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study characterizes the modulation of the endothelial cell phenotype in response to blood flow induced wall shear stress. An animal specific approach has been used, whereby the same mouse is used in all stages of the investigation: MR angiography and cine phase contrast MRI (pcMRI) were used to image a murine aortic arch in vivo and provide velocity data on boundary conditions respectively. The images were then reconstructed digitally and a distribution of WSS throughout the aortic arch was then determined using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Then the distribution of WSS was used to guide the laser microdissection of aortic ECs from low and high shear stress regions. The gene-expression of ECs was then quantified using polymerase-chain reaction (PCR), and related to the wall shear-stress acting on those cells in vivo.

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  • Performance analysis of New Zealand websites using HTTP header values

    Chandran, R; Manoharan, Sathiamoorthy (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The simplest way to maximize the use of the available broadband capacity is to compress data transfers and cache data whenever possible. The HTTP protocol allows both compression and caching, benefiting both servers (in terms of bandwidth requirements and lighter load) and clients (in terms of faster downloads). In this paper, we investigate some of the top-ranking websites within New Zealand to see how well they are setup for network performance. We find a surprisingly large number of sites that are not well-setup to cater for compression and caching. We see that simple tuning of these servers to take advantage of compression and caching will enable better use of the network bandwidth. Though this study is limited to New Zealand, similar analysis could be made of other servers irrespective of their location.

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  • Rethinking Dance Writing

    Longley, Alys (2008)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The focus of this paper is an instance of practice led research. I will discuss the specific processes embedded in creating and performing a tightly scored improvisation work—named The Little peeling Cottage—in which choreographic writing was a central aspect in the dance structure and in performance. This practice led research engages with the politics of translation and the concept of writing as a form of listening and attending to movement. Choreographic writing is differentiated as drawn words, handwritten as a performance duet practice, with one dancer manifesting their dance in bodily movement, and the other manifesting their dance through the site of the page. ....

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  • PeerWise: Students sharing their multiple choice questions

    Denny, Paul; Hamer, John; Luxton-Reilly, Andrew; Purchase, Helen (2008)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    PeerWise is a system in which students create multiple choice questions and answer those created by their peers. In this paper, we report on some quantitative results which suggest that students who use PeerWise actively perform better in final examinations than students who are not active. We note a significant correlation between performance in written (not just multiple choice) questions and PeerWise activity, suggesting that active use of the system may contribute to deep (and not just drill-and-practise) learning.

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  • Software Licensing: A Classification and Case Study

    Manoharan, Sathiamoorthy; Wu, J (2007)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Software licensing schemes are controls put in software to grant or deny the use of the software. It plays an important part in the distribution and the control of software. This paper reviews some of the technologies behind software licensing schemes and presents a classification and a case study.

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  • Teu Le Va: the possibilities of collaborative relationships in Pasifika early childhood education

    Mara, Diane (2011)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The concept/tenet/practice of Teu Le Va in Pasifika education, research, policy and educational practice represents collaborative, reciprocal relationships and the nurturing and acting out of these by all stakeholders - families, communities, teachers, researchers and policy-makers. There are evident synergies between the principles and strands of Te Whaariki and Teu Le Va and these are explored within the broader theme of the conference - Teachers and Learners, exploring the spaces in-between. The va/va/va'a/vaha is a pan-Pacific notion describing a spatial and relational context within which the unfolding of secular and spiritual relationships can take place. Social, spiritual and relational contexts allow for personal and collective well-being and growth within the process of knowledge generation, social action and cultural transformation. In Teu Le Va, relationships are given space and valued so that all involved may benefit (Anae, 2007). There are common threads running through early childhood education in Aotearoa New Zealand and Teu le Va. Closer examination of Pasifika early childhood education policy and practice through the Teu Le Va paradigm potentially deepens our understanding about ‘spaces' between teachers and learners; learners and teachers and outwards towards our family whanau communities in Aotearoa.

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  • From my window – material for significance and hope (Keynote address)

    Anderson, Elizabeth (2010)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Elizabeth Anderson is a Senior Lecturer in drama in the Faculty of Education at the University of Auckland. She is currently working on an EdD, researching the characteristics of expert drama teaching in primary school settings, a project that will inform preservice teacher education. Research interests are in drama education particularly, and in preservice teacher education, and curriculum.

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