106 results for The University of Auckland Library, Conference paper

  • Speech Enhancement by Multi-Channel Crosstalk Resistant Adaptive Noise Cancellation

    Zeng, Qingning; Abdulla, Waleed (2006)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. A novel Multi-channel Crosstalk Resistant Adaptive Noise Cancellation (MCRANC) algorithm is presented in this paper to enhance noise carrying speech signals. The algorithm would permit locating the microphones in close proximity as it cancels out the crosstalk effect. Results have indicated that this method outperforms the commonly used techniques in the sense of SNR improvement and speech intelligibility. A SNR improvement of 17.8dB using MCRANC keeping highly intelligible speech was achieved in our experiments versus 9.1dB using Multi-channel ANC (MANC) with far less speech quality.

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  • A Variable Inductor Based Tuning Method for ICPT Pickups

    James, Jason; Boys, John T.; Covic, Grant (2005)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. A practical dynamic inductor-tuning circuit for a parallel resonant ICPT power pickup operating at 38.4kHz is described. The method controls the current through a tuning inductor by varying the turn on delay of two power switches. This varies the inductor current so that the tank may be maintained at resonance. Supporting mathematical analysis, circuit simulation and prototype measurements are included. Experimental results have verified the system behaviour.

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  • A soft decision output convolutional decoder based on the application of neural networks

    Berber, Stevan (2005)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. The paper investigates BER characteristics of a new algorithm for decoding convolutional codes based on neural networks. The novelty of the algorithm is in its capability to generate soft output estimates of the message bits encoded. It is shown that the defined noise energy function, which is traditionally used for the soft decoding algorithm of convolutional codes, can be related to the well known log likelihood function. The coding gain is calculated using a developed simulator of a coding communication system that uses a systematic 1/2-rate convolutional code.

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  • E-books - essentials or extras? The University of Auckland Library experience

    Mincic-Obradovic, Ksenija (2004)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    The e-publishing industry is developing rapidly, providing new opportunities for libraries, but creating new challenges as well. Questions on how best to integrate e-books into the learning environment are pressing. In 2003, the University of Auckland Library provided access to nearly 80,000 e-books through the library catalogue only. This paper will explore some of the theoretical and practical issues of implementing e-books in the University of Auckland Library, covering such issues as: - Integration - Workflow - Differences in perception/acceptance of digital texts - Response from students and staff - User preferences and reasons for these

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  • Intrepid traveller: the University of Auckland Library on the e-book journey

    Mincic-Obradovic, Ksenija (2006)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    E-books continue to thrive with e-book technology companies developing a variety of solutions for libraries, many of which offer excellent support for teaching and learning. The objective of this paper is to present the University of Auckland Library’s experiences in integrating e-books into the learning environment. This is a complex issue and will be considered from different perspectives: selection, purchasing, providing access, cataloguing, and user support and satisfaction.

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  • A Comparison of Multilevel Solvers for the Cardiac Bidomain Equations

    Austin, Travis; Trew, Mark; Pullan, Andrew (2005)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Computing the extracellular potentials in a bidomain cardiac activation model is a computationally significant step in the solution process. Thus, using a fast solver can drastically reduce the overall time of simulation. Solving for the extracellular potentials involves inverting the matrix coming from the elliptic equation describing the extracellular-intracellular potential coupling. Elliptic equations are known to yield matrices that become progressively more ill-conditioned as the spatial resolution is increased. However, optimal multilevel solution methods are known to exist for these equations given enough effort is placed into developing the correct solution components. Two multilevel solvers that automatically perform much of this work are Black Box Multigrid (BOXMG) and Algebraic Multigrid (AMG). In this paper, we compare the performance of BOXMG and AMG as solvers for the elliptic component of the bidomain equations. Our investigation is with respect to simulations of reentry in two-dimensional cardiac tissue.

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  • Evaluation of the effect of postural and gravitational variations on the distribution of pulmonary blood flow via an image-based computational model

    Burrowes, Kelly; Hunter, Peter; Tawhai, Merryn (2005)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. We have developed an image-based computational model of blood flow within the human pulmonary circulation in order to investigate the distribution of flow under various conditions of posture and gravity. Geometric models of the lobar surfaces and largest arterial and venous vessels were derived from multi-detector row x-ray computed tomography. The remaining blood vessels were generated using a volume-filling branching algorithm. Equations representing conservation of mass and momentum are solved within the vascular geometry to calculate pressure, radius, and velocity distributions. Flow solutions are obtained within the model in the upright, inverted, prone, and supine postures and in the upright posture with and without gravity. Additional equations representing large deformation mechanics are used to calculate the change in lung geometry and pressure distributions within the lung in the various postures - creating a coupled, co-dependent model of mechanics and flow. The embedded vascular meshes deform in accordance with the lung geometry. Results illustrate a persistent flow gradient from the top to the bottom of the lung even in the absence of gravity and in all postures, indicating that vascular branching structure is largely responsible for the distribution of flow.

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  • High Resolution 3D Imaging of Lung Tissue using Structured Light Microscopy

    Kvistedal, Yme; Tawhai, Merryn; Hunter, Peter; Nielsen, Poul (2005)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. A 3D reconstruction microscope has been built in order to investigate the structural details of the airway tree and the vasculature of mouse lungs. The objective is to create an anatomically correct finite element model of a mouse lung in order to validate results from simulations obtained using an existing model of the human lung. The 3D reconstruction microscope consists of a fully automated scanning stage, a vibratome and a structured light optical microscope. Structured light microscopy is a new approach to optical sectioning of tissue and offers several advantages over confocal microscopy.

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  • A Replicated Comparison of Cross-Company and Within-Company Effort Estimation Models Using the ISBSG Database

    Mendes, Emilia; Lokan, Chris; Harrison, Robert; Triggs, Christopher (2005)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Four years ago was the last time the ISBSG database was used to compare the effort prediction accuracy between cross-company and within-company cost models. Since then more than 2,000 projects have been volunteered to this database, which may have changed the trends previously observed. This paper therefore replicates a previous study by investigating how successful a cross-company cost model is: i) to estimate effort for projects that belong to a single company and were not used to build the cross-company model; ii) compared to a within-company cost model. Our within-company data set had data on 184 software projects from a single company and our cross-company data set employed data on 672 software projects. Our results did not corroborate those from the previous study, showing that predictions based on the within-company model were not significantly more accurate than those based on the cross-company model. We analysed the data using forward stepwise regression.

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  • 65 THz beat frequency observed from a scalar modulation instability experiment

    Kruhlak, Robert; Wong, Gordon; Clark, Heather; Leonhardt, Rainer; Harvey, John; Knight, J C; Wadsworth, W J; Russell, P St. J (2005)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. We have observed an optical modulation with a period of about 15 fs by beating the anti-stokes wave and the pump wave exiting a photonic crystal fibre. These results confirm the coherence of the sidebands generated by scalar modulation instability in the normal dispersion regime. Future experiments will be conducted to measure the beating of the stokes and the anti-stokes waves.

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  • A Java reuse repository for Eclipse using LSI

    Lin, Min Yang (Jerry); Amor, Robert; Tempero, Ewan (2006)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Software reuse is a concept that is frequently mentioned as a way to improve software developers' productivity. However, there are a number of issues that need to be addressed in order for software reuse to be adopted by developers. One of those issues is providing enough reusable artifacts. The Java Standard API has been quite successful in this, with the latest version having over 3000 classes available. However this raises the issue of finding the right artifact to reuse. With the Java API, this means trawling through the JavaDoc Web pages, which has the risk of not being able to find the right artifact, even though it is in the API. In this paper, we explore the use of latent semantic indexing as a means to index the Java API JavaDoc pages. Specifically, we describe Prophecy, an Eclipse plug-in that presents the Java API as a software repository.

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  • Performance of a speech-data PRMA system in an in-building environment

    Orange, M.D.; Sowerby, K.W.; Coulson, A.J.; Butterworth, K.S. (1997)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. The performance of an in-building speech-data PRMA system employing frequency reuse is determined via computer simulation. Propagation measurements (at 1.8 GHz) made in the building in which the PRMA system is assumed to operate, are included in the analysis. Significant variations in performance are found to exist over the coverage area. Optimum system performance is obtained by allocating the entire bandwidth to each floor (i.e., complete frequency reuse) and re-transmitting any packets that are corrupted by cochannel interference. This significant result suggests that packet access schemes such as PRMA can provide an alternative to TDMA and CDMA based future wireless networks

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  • Design and Development of Medical Simulations in Second Life and OpenSim

    Diener, Scott; Windsor, John; Bodily, David (2009)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    EDUCAUSE Australasia 2009, Perth Western Australia. 3‐6 May 2009 http://www.caudit.edu.au/educauseaustralasia09/. Let’s be honest, our physical classrooms haven’t changed a lot over the years as a result of technology. In fact, technology has actually interrupted some of the powerful interactive dynamics that have historically been a part of good teaching - wandering around the classroom interacting with students, looking directly into eyeballs! PowerPoint education has tied teachers to a menudriven podium, and ever-increasing class sizes have cast students into even larger ’seating batteries’ where they can be fed. But we can do better. In her book, Designing Learning Spaces, Diana Oblinger provides a wonderfully clear view of what we could accomplish: The key, therefore, is to provide a physical space that supports multidisciplinary, team-taught, highly interactive learning unbound by traditional time constraints within a social setting that engages students and faculty and enables rich learning experiences. However, what if we use virtual space rather than physical space? Can we apply the same concepts? These are early days, but we are becoming convinced that we can. It is now possible to construct unique and detailed virtual environments that rival real physical teaching spaces, and in some cases to even surpass that which is possible in reality. We can construct learning spaces that are unbound by physical and geographical constraints, presenting to students experiences that would be too dangerous or unacceptable in reality. In virtual learning spaces we can stand inside an active volcano, experience and respond to natural disasters, or practice laparoscopic surgery on simulated patients. Our only limits seem to be those of imagination. This paper presents the current work of the Academic and Collaborative Technologies group at the University of Auckland. The paper describes the conceptual design and construction details of the University’s Second Life simulation island, Medical Centre and Emergency Room simulations. The paper also discusses the University’s involvement in the development of a National Virtual World Grid based upon the OpenSim platform (a collaboration between Otago University, Canterbury University, The University of Auckland, and Telecom New Zealand).

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  • Using a Visual Wiki for IT Knowledge Management

    Chaffe, Tim (2009)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    EDUCAUSE Australasia 2009, Perth Western Australia. 3‐6 May 2009 http://www.caudit.edu.au/educauseaustralasia09/. The catch cry of John Zachman when talking about Enterprise Architecture is ‘Document, document, document, document.... {for as many times as possible until a deep breath and then) Document, document, document, document and document again’. This rallying cry fills a tertiary sector Enterprise Architect with foreboding daunted by the sheer amount of organisational information needed to constitute even a partially populated six by six dimension Zachman Framework. Forming and sustaining Enterprise Architecture (EA) is possible if authoring is distributed across an organisation. However existing EA diagramming and repository tools are aimed at EA practitioners and are not user or cost friendly for the general user populace. Treating EA as a form of IT Knowledge Management and using the Confluence Wiki has improved the capture of IT information within The University of Auckland. However as the volume of information has mounted, the ability to navigate and sustain the knowledgebase has decreased, and the demand for ‘simple diagrams showing everything’ was not satisfied by Gliffy plugins. Working closely with the Computer Science department of The University of Auckland, we have prototyped alternate ways of capturing IT information that allows visual navigation combined with the agility of Wiki’s aka ’The Visual Wiki’.

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  • Distributed transaction management scheme for multidatabase systems

    Ye, Xinfeng; Keane, John A. (1995)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Transaction management in a multidatabase system must ensure global serializability. Local serializable execution is, by itself, not sufficient to ensure global serializability, since local serialization orders of subtransactions of global transactions must be the same in all systems. In this paper, a distributed transaction management scheme is introduced. The scheme maintains the autonomy of the local database systems. It is free from global deadlock and guarantees fairness in the execution of the transactions in the system

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  • Fault tolerant model for a functional language parallel machine

    Ye, Xinfeng; Keane, John A. (1995)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. The paper describes a fault tolerant model for a functional language parallel machine. The model is transparent to the user and ensures successful execution of programs in the presence of hardware failure. The model is based on data replication. It takes advantage of the properties of the functional languages. The recovery scheme can be carried out simultaneously on all processors and occurs while “normal” program execution is in progress. Thus normal execution suffers less performance degradation than with other approaches

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  • EPROM cell with a magnesium electronic injector

    Kong, Sik On; Kwok, Chee Yee; Wong, Sai Peng (1995)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. By using Mg as the tunnelling electrode for an EPROM cell, it is shown in a control experiment that the tunnelling current is much enhanced while the tunnelling field is much reduced after a sintering procedure in which Mg reacts with the SiO2 dielectric. Potentially, this may lead to faster programming, lower programming voltages and better programming endurance. An experimental EPROM cell has been made and has demonstrated programmability

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  • Non-linearity measure of a problem's crossover suitability

    Mason, Andrew (1995)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. For any problem with an unknown fitness function, justification of an evolutionary algorithm as a research method necessarily relies upon conjectures about that fitness function. This paper formulates apparent crossover partition coefficients (a generalisation of Walsh transforms) and uses these to develop a new model of crossover non-linearity ratios. Experimental runs demonstrate that this theory can offer insights into the apparent tractability of problems under crossover

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  • ION architecture for robot learning

    Qualtrough, Paul (1995)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. It is claimed that one of the main reasons why the development of intelligent robots has been slower than expected is that machine learning has been seen as an “add on” feature-one to be placed in the higher and later-developed levels of robot architectures. A case is made for incorporating machine learning at the earliest possible stage, and relying on it as the primary method of developing robot controllers. An architecture is proposed to support this approach

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  • Embedding Information Literacy Online

    Gunn, Cathy; Hearne, Shari (2009)

    Conference paper
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. The University of Auckland aims to provide its graduates with general intellectual skills, capacities and attributes, as well as discipline-based knowledge. The University’s Information Literacy Policy ensures that information literacy (IL) resources are used as effectively as possible in teaching and learning activities, for example, through the University Library’s IL programme. This programme offers a flexible e-learning approach that includes the use of interactive, self-paced online tutorials, which can be tailored for specific subjects, courses and assignments. The large numbers of students enrolled in Business School courses can sometimes preclude face-to-face instruction in business information literacy skills. There are also international students from diverse backgrounds with English as an additional language (EAL) and mature students returning to graduate study who require reiterative high quality information literacy instruction. The Library, in collaboration with the Centre for Academic Development and Business School academics, agreed to develop a suite of self-paced information literacy tutorials to service these varied demands. Development of interactive online tutorials is a common strategy in universities seeking to reconcile the challenge of scale with principles of learner-centred instruction. The literature reveals many advantages, both educational and practical. In this case, the aim is to design a range of online activities that: * Can be customised and incorporated into the curriculum for specific assignments * Align with terms of the University’s Academic Plan and Graduate Profiles * Are flexible, portable and user-focused * Use a range of video, audio, graphics and interactive web-based technologies within learning designs to motivate and engage students from a range of educational backgrounds and age-groups. Development of this type of e-learning resource is typically a collaborative effort involving subject matter experts, multimedia and web developers and learning designers. The initial concept for online Information Literacy modules was presented to the University’s eLearning Design and Development Group in the form of a project proposal by a team of Business Librarians. As discussions and conceptual development progressed, existing online information literacy (OIL) skills modules developed by a TEC-funded collaboration between the University of Otago, Dunedin College of Education and the Otago Polytechnic were considered as a possible reusable resource. While the content and reusability aspects of these modules rated highly, practical considerations of hosting and integration with local systems pointed to a local solution. A web-based Course Builder tool already in common use by the eLearning team would provide a suitable and easy to use in-house development and hosting environment. The open access / open source nature of the OIL modules meant parts of them could be repurposed for inclusion in locally developed and hosted activities, giving teaching staff greater control of content and use. Consultation with a key member of the OIL development team lent considerable expertise and background information to the local initiative. At the time of writing, the modules are still under development. This paper describes development of the innovative design concept, its grounding in current literature on teaching of generic skills and e-learning design, and the three-way collaboration involved in its implementation.

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