231 results for The University of Auckland Library, Conference poster

  • CUTE: CUTting Edge Diamond Optimization

    Downward, Anthony; Zakeri, G (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Centenary Diamond, weighing 55g, was estimated to be worth $100 million when it was unveiled in 1991. This diamond was cut from a rough-stone weighing 120g; thus when cutting such a stone, it is imperative to orient the stone such that waste is minimized. Our interactive software allows a user to maximize the value of a diamond from a given rough-stone. As the user alters the orientation of the diamond, it solves optimization problems to scale and position the diamond within the rough-stone.

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  • Impact of PCV7 on antibiotic susceptibiity of nasophayngeal Streptococcus pneumoniae in South Auckland children

    Sekikawa, E; Trenholme, A; Taylor, S; Lennon, Diana; McBride, C; Best, Emma (2011-03-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • "But what about the theory?" Designing a social work curriculum around practice learning and reflection

    Adamson, Carole; Bellinger, A (2010-06-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Curriculum design in an academic context operates within a site of tension characterised by the need

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  • Aged Residential Care Health Utilisation Study (ARCHUS). A randomised controlled trial to reduce acute hospitalisations from residential aged care.

    Broad, J.B; Foster, Susan; Boyd, M.; Kerse, N.; Lumley, T.; Connolly, M.J. (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background and Aim Our aim is to reduce avoidable acute hospitalisations of residents of long-term care facilities. Such hospitalisations can cause distress, disruption, and complications for residents. Some conditions have been identified as better managed in the facility providing supports are in place. A randomised controlled trial is underway in Auckland, New Zealand of a targeted, multi-disciplinary team (MDT) to up-skill facility staff. We here outline the study design. Design Clustered randomised controlled trial (~1400 residents) of long-term care facilities, stratified by district health board (DHB). Randomisation and interventions commenced March 2011. Facilities certified for long-term care of older people in greater Auckland are eligible for selection if they have high levels of avoidable hospitalisation. Intervention MDTs supporting facility staff to provide evidence-based care. The supports and services provided comprise an initial stock-take assessment and development of facility plan, direct access to a geriatrician and gerontology nurse specialist (GNS), MDT meetings for individual cases, and provision of targeted education to facility nurses/caregivers, facilitated by a GNS. Education topics are based on modelling of risk factors for avoidable hospitalisation from long-term care in Auckland (2008-2010) and include recognition of illness, wound care, care planning, end-stage dementia care, nutrition/dehydration, family communication, specific clinical coaching with high-risk residents, role modelling of clinical reasoning processes, and provision of benchmarking systems. Control Usual care: the quality assurance, supports, and services routinely provided by the DHB Endpoints Primary endpoints include rate of hospitalisations in which the admission diagnosis code is one of a set pre-identified as being potentially avoidable (“Ambulatory Sensitive Hospitalisations”), emergency admission hospital bed days, and all-cause mortality. Secondary endpoints include number of emergency department presentations and number and type of medications prescribed. Residents’ outcomes will be tracked for 12 months from randomisation using their unique national health identifiers (NHIs).

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  • Managing inpatient hypoglycaemia: A clinical audit

    Coats, A; Marshall, Dianne (2010-09-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Aim To examine nursing management of hypoglycaemic episodes in the hospitalised adult patient with Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the general medical/surgical wards at a secondary level hospital. Objective To describe hypoglycaemia treatment patterns in the adult inpatient by examining nursing adherence to the Northland District Health Board hospital hypoglycaemia protocol. Method A retrospective audit of 32 sets of treatment and progress notes identified nurses’ adherence to the protocol for management of inpatient hypoglycaemia . Results Adherence to the individual steps of the protocol was low. Nurses administered the recommended initial treatment in 40.4% of cases. Within 30 minutes of detection, 36.7% episodes were corrected. Medical staff were informed of hypoglycaemia in 11.4% of cases. This step achieved the lowest adherence. Nurses documented 87.7% of episodes. There was a high degree of recurrent hypoglycaemia (71.9%). Discussion It is critical to patient outcomes that the steps of the protocol are undertaken correctly. Failure to provide the recommended treatment resulted in some patients experiencing prolonged episodes. Whilst frequency of nursing documentation of episodes was high, critical assessment of causes and or a management plan were not routinely documented. Nurses did not routinely advise medical staff of episodes, consequently medical review of causes of hypoglycaemia and the management plan occurred infrequently. Failure to review management contributed to the high number of recurrent episodes.

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  • A Structure-Based Model Analysis Of Ventilation And Contrast Gas Distribution In The Ovine Lung

    Mitchell, JH; Hoffman, EA; Mitchell, Jennine (2011-05-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Rationale: Sheep are increasingly used as a model for human ventilation, however there are substantive anatomical differences between human and ovine lungs that may affect the gravitational distribution of tissue at rest and during ventilation. Understanding ventilation and gas transport in the ovine lung is important for interpreting measurements acquired via in vivo gas contrast imaging, such as xenon enhanced computed tomography (Xe-CT). In this study a computational model that integrates finite elastic deformation of the soft tissue with distribution of inspired air was applied to the ovine lung to determine whether a model that is consistent with human ventilation and gas distribution in also suitable for the simulation of ventilation in experimental animals. Methods: Xe-CT imaging was acquired in three sheep at the University of Iowa Division of Physiologic Imaging. Image based finite element meshes were constructed for each lung and the airway tree at a positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 25 cmH 20 in prone and supine postures. Ventilation and gas transport were simulated for each animal using a computational model that includes finite deformation elasticity to define the pressure volume relationship of the lung, and time-dependent advective and diffusive transport of inhaled Xe gas. Gravitational deformation was simulated prone and supine, and ventilation was simulated for the prone lung. The specific volume change predicted from the advective flow simulation was compared to specific ventilation calculated using the time constant method that is used in Xe-CT analysis. Results: The finite deformation model accurately predicts the regional tissue density in prone but underestimates the supine gradient. Ventilation simulated in the prone posture for each of the three animals indicates that the ventilation distribution predicted by an advective flow model typically differs from that predicted from the time constant method of analysis. The R 2 correlations between the simulations and time constant calculations were 0.7824, 0.3423 and 0.42881 for each of the three animals. Conclusions: The human-consistent model is inadequate for predicting ventilation in supine sheep, because the model does not include movement of the heart or fluid shifts that were evident in the imaging. However the model is sufficiently predictive for the prone ovine lung. That advective ventilation differs from inert gas transport is consistent with experimental findings that show a correlation of R 2 of 0.66 between specific volume and ventilation calculated from tracer gas mixing (1). Fuld et al (2008) J. Appl. Physiol 104:1174-1184 This abstract is funded by: NIH Grant ROI-HL-064368-06A1

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  • Characterisation of a transgenic ovine model of Huntington’s disease

    Reid, Susanne; Handley, R; Patassini, S; Rudiger, S; Keynes, P; McLaughlan, C; Waldvogel, H; Jacobsen, J; MacDonald, M; Gusella, J; Morton, J; Bawden, S; Faull, R; Snell, R (2011-09-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A transgenic ovine model of Huntington’s disease has been developed to enable the examination of the earliest disease changes in a large mammal. Ovis aries were selected because their basal ganglia and cortex is similar to analogous regions of the human brain. Importantly, they live for more than a decade, allowing for the study of the chronic effects of a fulllength HTT expressing transgene. Microinjection of a fulllength human HD cDNA containing 73 polyglutamine repeats under the control of the human promoter, resulted in six transgenic founders varying in copy-number of the transgene.

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  • What Does My Grade Mean?: Differing Assessment Models in Chemistry.

    Salter, David (2009-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Determining whether students have learnt what was intended is a crucial aspect of every course. How this is done and what the outcome shows can however vary greatly. Traditionally in New Zealand, tertiary students’ academic ability is assessed using methods that allow for discrimination between students through norm-referencing, typically producing a single cumulative percentage value which is translated into a letter grade. In contrast, the Government-mandated system for assessing secondary school students in New Zealand is based on a model of criterion-referenced assessment that aims to describe students’ current level of performance with reference to specific performance criteria which are derived from national curriculum statements. Consequently, in progressing from secondary to tertiary education in New Zealand, students experience a major change in the assessment of their performance from being independent of others to being relative to others. A comparison of these two assessment systems used in New Zealand will be presented as well as a description of how standards-based assessment is being introduced into several first-year tertiary chemistry courses as a way to better indicate students’ current capabilities and assist students in the transition between secondary and tertiary education.

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  • Examination of miRNAs involved in programming human T cells

    Sheppard, Hilary; Feisst, Vaughan; Brooks, Anna; Dunbar, R (2011-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The differentiation state of CD8+ T cells is an important determinant of their ability to eradicate tumours and infection; progressive differentiation appears to lead to a decreased effectiveness. Therefore the development of effective immunotherapies depends on a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie T cell differentiation. Several key cell surface markers are down regulated as differentiation progresses so we can define CD8+ T cells into 4 main subsets (see Fig. 1). Each subset is generated by a specific transcriptional programme. Our hypothesis is that miRNAs are important in this process of T cell differentation. If you take a cancer patient’s cells, expand in vitro, and re-infuse to the patient, the phenotype of the T cell will determine its efficacy in vivo. We have found that we can pre-condition T cells using the cytokine IL21 to have a more favourable phenotype than using the traditionally used cytokine IL2 (data not shown). We aim to explore this cytokine driven differentiation process by examining the miRNAs involved.

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  • Islet human amylin oligomer formation is differentially correlated with β-cell death and diabetes onset between homozygous and hemizygous human amylin transgenic mice

    Zhang, S; Liu, H; Li, XL; Au, M; Chuang, CL; Cooper, GJS (2010)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    One of the pathological features of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the presence of islet amyloid deposits comprising mainly human amylin (hA)/hIAPP. Recent studies suggested that soluble oligomers of human amylin may be the primary cause of β-cell damage and thus contribute to the onset/development of T2DM. However, the molecular basis of this process remains to be fully elucidated. We aimed to investigate the connection between soluble oligomers and hA cytotoxicity, and their correlation with diabetes development using a rodent model of diabetes.

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  • Resources and strategies used in New Zealand community pharmacies to identify and assist patients with low literacy: An opportunity to improve health outcomes.

    Aspden, Trudi; Sheridan, JL; McKie, J (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Patients with lower literacy generally have less knowledge of health services, poorer health outcomes[1] and are more likely to have difficulty understanding prescription medication warning labels[2]. Objectives: To determine how pharmacy staff identify patients with limited literacy skills, the strategies used for identification, the resources available to help patients with low literacy and opportunities for upskilling. Methodology: A questionnaire was adapted from one developed by Praska et al 2005 [3]. A random sample of 120 New Zealand pharmacies were sent information about the study. Those pharmacists willing to participate were interviewed by telephone. Results: The response rate was 64% (n=77). Almost 38% of respondents reported that they used measures to identify patients with low literacy, most often during patient counselling. The most common strategy used to optimise the health care of patients with low literacy was spending extra time explaining the information. Written information in the form of Self Care cards and information leaflets was the resource most commonly available. However, 4% of respondents had no resources available in their pharmacy.

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  • Co-Prescribing of Medications with Anticholinergic Properties to Those Using Cholinesterase Inhibitors for Dementia

    Garrigan, Katherine; John, N; McGrogan, A; Jones, R; de-Vries, C (2010-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Medications with anticholinergic (AC) propertieshave adverse effects on cognition and many guidelines recommend avoiding them in older adults. Theoretically they could negate benefits of cholinesterase inhibitor (CI) treatment in patients dementia patients, although there is inadequate evidence to date. Objectives: To determine the frequency of AC medicine use in patients treated with a CI and to assess whether such use is associated with early CI discontinuation. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was carried out using the General Practice Research Database. Subjectswere all patients aged 18+ with a new CI prescription after January 2000. All medicines were classified as to their AC properties according to the Rudolph Anticholinergic Risk Scale. AC medication use in patients prescribed CI was determined as well as CI discontinuation rates in those with and without AC medicines. Cox regression survival analysis with time dependent covariates was carried out to determine risk factors for CI discontinuation. Results: 7523 patients newly prescribed CIs were identified. On average, CIs were prescribed for 536 days; 50% of users had discontinued treatment 383 days after CI initiation;75% had discontinued by day 777. 3556 (47%) patients used CIs and AC medicines concomitantly; 1946 (26%) for over 90 days. Being underweight and frail were associated with a 12–15% higher risk of CI discontinuation. An association was found between concomitant AC use (especially antipsychotics) and discontinuation of CI but no association with the strength of AC action or cumulative exposure. Patients aged 80+ were significantly more likely to discontinue their CI early: HRadj 1.27 (CI951.13–1.43) in 80–84 year olds and 1.72 (CI951.53–1.93) in those aged 85+. Conclusions: Further work is needed to evaluate any association between CI discontinuation and cumulative AC exposure. Very elderly and underweight patients discontinued CIs earlier.

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  • Preclinical characterization of PWT33597, a dual inhibitor of PI3-kinase alpha and mTOR.

    Matthews, DJ; O’Farrell, M; James, J; Giddens, Anna; Rewcastle, Gordon; Denny, William (2011-04-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    4485: Phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) is an important mediator of tumor cell growth, survival and proliferation. In particular, PI3K alpha is important for signaling downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases and is also frequently amplified or mutationally activated in tumors, suggesting that selective inhibitors of this isoform may have therapeutic utility in the treatment of cancer. Downstream of PI3K, the mTOR kinase also plays a critical role in cellular growth and metabolism, and inhibitors of mTOR have demonstrated clinical benefit in several tumor types. We report here the discovery and characterization of PWT33597, a dual inhibitor of PI3K alpha and mTOR. PWT33597 inhibits PI3K alpha and mTOR in biochemical assays with IC50 values of 19 and 14 nM respectively, and is approximately 10-fold selective with respect to PI3K gamma and PI3K delta. Profiling of PWT33597 against 442 protein kinases (Ambit Kinomescan) revealed little or no cross-reactivity with either serine/threonine or tyrosine kinases, and there was little cross-reactivity with an additional panel of 64 pharmacologically relevant targets. In NCI-H460 and HCT116 tumor cells with mutationally activated PI3K alpha, PWT33597 inhibits phosphorylation of PI3K and mTOR pathway proteins with cellular IC50 values similar to its biochemical IC50 values. PWT33597 has good pharmacokinetic properties in multiple preclinical species, is not extensively metabolized in vivo and shows little potential for interaction with cytochrome P450 enzymes. Following a single oral dose in vivo, PWT33597 shows durable inhibition of PI3K and mTOR pathway signaling in xenograft tumors. High compound distribution into tumors and potent anti-tumor activity has been observed in multiple tumor xenograft models with activated PI3K/mTOR pathways. Also, administration of PWT33597 in mice is associated with transient increases in plasma insulin, consistent with an effect on PI3K/AKT signaling. A robust PK/PD relationship has been defined, which will guide interpretation of the planned phase I clinical study. IND-enabling studies with PWT33597 are currently in progress.

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  • Functional analysis of the novel melanoma master-regulators

    Wang, Li (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Melanoma is a devastating form of cancer that is especially common in New Zealand and that is incompletely understood. In this project, we are using clinical microarray information about the function of tens of thousands of genes in melanoma patients. We are combining this clinical microarray information with microarray analysis of melanoma cells in the laboratory. In this laboratory analysis we have knocked down the expression of 75 different genes using a method known as siRNA. This clinical and laboratory data is combined mathematically using a method known as gene network analysis. This allows us to identify novel "master-regulators" of melanoma, which are seen as “hubs” in melanoma gene networks. These hubs may drive the uncontrolled growth of melanoma cells, and are likely to be useful as prognostic markers or new drug targets. We have already identified several novel melanoma gene network hubs using this method. The sequences encoding these hubs are cloning into an expression vector, and the candidate hub genes are then screened through a functional screening platform. Since we are interested the clinically important genes, we screen to identify those genes that may play a role in proliferation, sensitivity to drug-induced apoptosis, and survival. We will transfect all the candidate genes (alongside a negative vector only control and a positive control of Bcl-2) into 293T cells (human embryonic kidney cells containing the SV40large T antigen to promote episomal replication of transfected plasmids), and A375 cells (melanoma). We will screen for expressed gene function using assays for viable cell number (MTT), assays for cell cycle progression (flow cytometry), and apoptosis assays. In particular we will use the anti-neoplastic drug etoposide (VP16) to induce apoptosis in cells that have been transfected by these genes and controls, to assess gene product function in modifying the apoptosis induced by VP16. For clinically relevant network hub genes that appear to play a role in controlling proliferation, apoptosis and survival, we will home in further on their mechanism of action (the methods used will depend upon our hypotheses about the gene product's function). We hope some of those hubs may lead to novel diagnostic/prognostic assays and novel drug targets.

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  • Light Exposure Patterns in Children: A Pilot Study

    Backhouse, Simon; Ng, H; Phillips, John (2010-07-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Purpose To examine the light exposure patterns of school aged children in relation to refractive error. Methods School-aged children (13-14 years old, n = 12) were issued with self-contained light meters that recorded the ambient light levels every 10 seconds (HOBO Pendant UA-002-064, Onset Computer Corporation, USA). The ambient light levels were collected every 10 seconds over seven days (one period). Measurements were made in three periods over three consecutive months in winter. Cycloplegic autorefraction and axial length measurements were made at the beginning and end of the three month study. Results Ambient light level recordings indicated that while children spent only a small amount of time outside (10.65 ± 2.52 hours per week, or 5.88 ± 1.39% of the total time; mean ± 95% CI, n = 12) these outdoor periods accounted for a large proportion of their total light exposure (4.72 × 107 ± 1.65 × 107 lux, or 87.95 ± 3.72% of their total light exposure). The subjects were exposed to only 5.72 ± 1.86% of the total available light on average over the measurement period. There was a significant correlation between the amount of time spent indoors (between 10 and 1000 lux) and the cumulative light exposure obtained indoors (R2 = 0.945). There was, however, a poor correlation between the amount of time spent outdoors (>1000 lux) and the cumulative light exposure obtained outdoors (R2 = 0.296). Refractive error was not significantly correlated with cumulative light exposure (R2 < 0.001). There were no significant correlations between the rate of change in light levels and refractive error. Discussion and Conclusions A small amount of time spent outdoors is associated with a large proportion of daily light exposure. While predictable levels of light exposure are obtained indoors, there is a great degree of variability in the amount of light received by going outdoors. Thus, a small amount of extra time spent outdoors can disproportionally affect the total light exposure received per day. Further investigations of the quality (e.g. spectral composition) and quantity (e.g. yearly exposure, differing seasons, etc.) of light received by school-aged children are warranted.

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  • Talking Allowed!

    Davies, Maree; Sinclair, A (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Research on the Paideia Method (a method for discussing a topic) was conducted in 20 classrooms across five schools, of varying socioeconomic environments (ages 11-13) in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2010. The researchers sought to further examine the results from their pilot study of the Paideia Seminar, entitled 'Talking Allowed: I like it when the teacher lets us talk without telling us what to say', trialed in 2008 (Sinclair & Davies, 2011). In addition, in order to provide the optimum conditions to prepare the students for the face-to-face seminars, an online component (open source software) was added as an alternative medium to assist students in their preparation. The research questions were: What happens to the Nature of Interaction, and the Complexity of the Discussion when students participate in a Paideia Seminar, and an on-line discussion in preparation for the face-to-face seminar? What is the optimal role of the teacher when participating in a Paideia Seminar and an on-line discussion to increase complexity of discussion?

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  • Effect of contact lens induced retinal defocus on the thickness of the human choroid

    Chiang, Samuel; Backhouse, S; Phillips, John (2014-04-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to describe the amplitude and time-course of choroidal thickness changes induced by imposed hyperopic and myopic retinal defocus and to compare the responses in emmetropic and myopic subjects. METHODS Twelve Asian subjects (6 emmetropes and 6 myopes) aged between 18 and 34 years had OCT images of the choroid taken in both eyes at 5 min intervals while exposed to monocular defocus (random right or left eye) for 60 min; the fellow eye was kept optimally corrected (no defocus). Two different monocular defocus conditions (2 D hyperopic or 2 D myopic defocus) were tested on separate occasions. Thickness changes were measured as absolute changes in microns. RESULTS Prior to applying defocus, mean choroidal thickness in myopic eyes (mean ± SD, 256.30µm ± 41.24µm) was significantly less than in emmetropic eyes (mean ± SD, 423.09µm ± 60.69µm) (p<0.05) in 60 minutes. No significant difference was found between emmetropes and myopes in changes of choroidal thickness with the two types of defocus. CONCLUSIONS Small but significant choroidal thickness changes occurred when human eyes were exposed to both myopic and hyperopic monocular defocus. In each case these changes acted to move the retina towards the altered image plane, so as to reduce the degree of defocus. In this small sample we could detect no difference in responses of myopic eyes compared to emmetropic eyes.

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  • Searching for anomalous light curves in massive data sets

    Rattenbury, Nicholas (2014-01-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The photometric surveys currently under way by the MOA and OGLE collaborations have produced and are extending databases of millions of stellar light curves. These databases have allowed investigations into diverse astrophysical fields including variable stars, proper motion studies and Galactic structure. Odd, or otherwise curious events have been discovered in the databases. We consider here one such event and propose methods for discovering more like it in the microlensing databases. A further aim of this initial work is to set out the prospects of the classification scheme for identifying time series that are maximally discordant - i.e. those that do not look like any other time series in the data set, and which therefore, may be of particular interest.

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  • Collaborative Problem Solving for Do-ers and Teachers of Mathematics

    Sheryn, Sarah; Frankcom, G; Ledger, G (2014-11-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study sought to explore and analyse the phenomenon of maths anxiety within a real-life context, and to identify if levels of maths anxiety can be reduced through participation in a reciprocal teaching process. This poster presents a small element of the larger study, which investigated how to reduce maths anxiety in teacher candidates. Maths anxiety is a well-researched phenomenon that is known to impede the successful mathematics teaching and learning experiences of some teacher candidates. The maths anxiety these students bring to their mathematics education courses results in poor quality mathematics teaching (Biddulph 1999; Frankcom 2006; Sloan 2010). Mathematics education lecturers have become increasingly aware of how some students become visibly anxious when they walk into the mathematics classroom, and/or are asked to collaborate to solve mathematical problems. These observations are supported by the level of maths anxiety reported by these students. The model developed for this study was informed by the work of Palinscar and Brown (1984) and complemented by problem-solving models from Mullis, et al. (2008), Reilly, Parsons and Bortolot (2009), and Polya (1945). The Revised Reciprocal Teaching Model (RRTM) was designed is to facilitate teacher candidates’ access to mathematical practices used in schools, and simultaneously develop their personal mathematical knowledge and understanding. Cognisant of the problem solving and peer mentoring literature, researchers provided opportunities for graduates to develop adaptive expertise. While peer mentoring is thoroughly established in literacy education it is under-researched within mathematics education. Reciprocal teaching falls within this area of research and provides a framework for individuals to mutually support each other while learning. The RRTM was developed to promote discourse within mathematical communities in an attempt to reduce maths anxiety. The implementation of the RRTM was through a two-phased structured framework, designed to take place over a university calendar year. The framework began with specific training of peer mentors who in turn worked with assigned mentees. The second phase promoted less reliance on the peer mentors and resulted in the students forming their own peer mentoring groups outside of class time. Results suggest that the model has a positive effect on students’ ability to confidently talk about and solve mathematical problems. This is evidenced by the decrease in maths anxiety levels self-reported by teacher candidates. This research indicates the RRTM has the potential to reduce maths anxiety levels of teacher candidates and produce confident do-ers and teachers of mathematics.

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  • What drives bacterial community structure in stream biofilms?

    Roberts, Kelly; Lear, Gavin; Turner, Susan; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    BACKGROUND The microorganisms within biofilms are the key basal trophic level within most freshwater systems. However, microbial structure, function and succession in natural stream systems remain poorly understood. This research characterises the biofilm community structure of stream biofilms experiencing different anthropogenic impacts and how they change over time. Our aim is describe the changes in bacterial biofilm communities over time and to investigate what drives these changes.

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