229 results for The University of Auckland Library, Conference poster

  • Blood flow redistribution following pulmonary micro-embolism

    Clark, Alys; Burrowes, KS; Tawhai, Merryn (2010)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Occlusion of pulmonary arteries by autologous clot and bead emboli affect pulmonary function by elevating arterial pressures and reducing the number of functional gas exchange units in the lung. The occlusion of multiple arterioles at the acinar level can have a significant impact on pulmonary function. However, the contribution of acinar structure to perfusion distribution and the significance of arteriole occlusion is not well characterized.

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  • Pregnancy Associated Changes in Insulin Signalling in Daughters of Adolescent Ewes

    Oliver, Mark; Hancock, SN; Kenyon, PR; Blair, HT; Pain, S; Morris, S; Phua, Hui; Bloomfield, Francis (2011-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Metabolomics as a novel approach to study mixed species biofilms of stream bacteria exhibiting mutualistic and antagonistic responses

    Washington, Vidya; Villas-Boas, Silas; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Experimental objective / Purpose 1. To investigate the metabolic interactions of bacterial species using metabolic footprint profiling. 2. As proof of concept, microbes exhibiting mutualistic and antagonistic associations were chosen for this study.

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  • Molecular investigation of protozoan diversity in stream biofilms

    Dopheide, AJ; Lear, Gavin; Lewis, Gillian (2006-11-21)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This research aims to test the following hypothesis: that molecular biological methods will allow description of protozoan diversity and ecology in streams.

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  • Visualizing multiscale models of the nephron

    Nickerson, David; Terkildsen, J; Hamilton, K; Hunter, Peter (2010-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We present the development of a tool which provides users with the ability to visualize and interact with multiscale models of the nephron ??? from the scale of models of membrane bound proteins, to that of an individual nephron. A 1-D finite element model of the nephron has been created and is used for both visualization and modeling of the tubule transport. Mathematical models of nephron segments (for example, Weinstein et al., Am. J. Physiol. 292:F1164-F1181, 2007 for the proximal tubule) are embedded in the finite element model. At the cellular level these segment models utilize models encoded in CellML (www.cellml.org) to describe cellular transport kinetics. A user interface has been developed which allows the visualization and interaction with the multiscale nephron models and simulation results. The zinc extension to Firefox (http://www.cmiss.org/cmgui/zinc/) is used to provide an interactive 3-D view of the model(s). This model viewer is embedded in a web page which dynamically presents content based on user input. For example, when viewing the whole nephron model the user might be presented with information on the various embedded segment models as they select them in the 3-D model view. Similarly, the user might choose to focus the model viewer on a cellular model in a particular segment in order to view the various membrane transport proteins. Selecting a specific protein might present the user with a full reference description of the mathematical model governing the behavior of that protein (Nickerson et al., Bioinformatics 24:1112-1114, 2008).

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  • Afferent axonal pathfinding in developing chicken rhomboencephalon

    Kubke, Maria; Wild, JM (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The developing hindbrain of vertebrates i organized in a series of rhombomeres, each giving rise to specifi c nuclei. The role of this segmentation has been extensively studied with respect to the origin of motor nuclei. The development of afferent innervation, however, has received little attention. Afferent axons enter the brainstem prior to the migration of their central targets and must therefore navigate in the absence of target derived information. Since the target nuclei for each afferent component originates within discrete rhombomeric boundaries, it is possible that the same positional information that is used by neuronal progenitors to defi ne their fi nal fate, may be available to afferent axons to direct them through their initial growth. This study was aimed at determining the normal sequence that characterises the growth of afferent axons in the hindbrain within the context of the site of origin and of the organisation of second order sensory neurons within specifi c rhombomere boundaries. Afferent axons were labelled at different embryonic ages using fl uorescent lipophilic dyes. Crystals of DiI and/or DiO were placed on specifi c exposed nerves or nerve branches of fi xed embryos. Embryos were incubated at 30 C for 18 hrs, after which the hindbrains were dissected, cleared in glycerol and analysed as whole-mount preparations with confocal microscopy. Afferent axons formed a series of fascicles that extended longitudinally along the alar plate, beyond the rhombomeric boundaries that give rise to their target nuclei. At early stages, the degree of organization and segregation of afferent axons did not appear to refl ect the adult patterns. Thus, it appears that the appropriate pathfi nding and fi nal segregation of the afferent components involves an initial profuse growth into the hindbrain, and that proper afferent patterning involves axon retraction and may require the initiation of migration if the central targets towards their fi nal position.

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  • A synthetic study towards aryl 6,6-spiroacetal analogues of rubromycin

    Choi, Peter; Rathwell, DC; Brimble, Margaret (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A Computational Model For Cerebral Circulation And Its Application For Haemodynamic Modelling In Vascular Surgeries

    Ho, Harvey; Mithraratne, K; Hunter, Peter (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Bronchoconstriction and the MBNW: Insights from anatomical lung modelling.

    Mitchell, Jennine; Tawahi MH (2010-11-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Bronchoconstriction and the MBNW: Insights from anatomical lung modelling. Jennine Mitchell and Dr Merryn Tawhai Auckland Bioengineering institute The multiple breath nitrogen washout (MBNW) is a global test of lung function that produces two indices Sacin and Scond that are reflective of ventilation heterogeneity arising at the level of acinus and between more spatially disparate regions of the lung respectively. An important application of the MBNW is in the study of asthma. Ventilation defects have been noted to occur in imaging studies of asthma. These regional ventilation defects have not previously been considered in relation to the MBNW indices. Scond is purported to be related to the state of conducting airways however no modelling studies exist which directly link the airway state to Scond. In this work regional ventilation defects have been simulated in an anatomically based human lung model and theoretically linked to the MBNW indices Sacin and Scond. Ventilation is simualted to the level of the acinus in a model in which acinar ventilation is considered independent of ventialtion in other acini. As previously indicated in modelling studies a high degree of constriction is required to produce a ventilation defect. The relationship between the degree of constriction in airways leading to the defect and the Scond index is however highly non-linear and shows a sharp decrease at very high levels of constriction. Ventilation defects potentially cause non-communication of gas trapped in the ventilation defects with the mouth. This may alter the calculation of FRC if nitrogen dilution is used to calculate FRC. As the indices are dependent on the phase III slope for each breath being normalised by FRC this alters MBNW results. The index Scond is not be able to be explained simply in terms of increased time constants due to increased resistance in the main conducting airway tree. The model indicates that the Scond index is more complex than current MBNW theory indicates and cannot be simply explained in terms of a longer time constant due to constriction in the conducting airway tree resulting in increased late emptying of poorly ventilated regions.

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  • A frontline perspective of organizational change: Analyzing the creation of a Youth Justice entity in Child, Youth and Family using Lewin, Kotter & Schein's change management and organizational culture models

    Webster, Michael; Herrmann, K (2009-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • CUTE: CUTting Edge Diamond Optimization

    Downward, Anthony; Zakeri, G (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Centenary Diamond, weighing 55g, was estimated to be worth $100 million when it was unveiled in 1991. This diamond was cut from a rough-stone weighing 120g; thus when cutting such a stone, it is imperative to orient the stone such that waste is minimized. Our interactive software allows a user to maximize the value of a diamond from a given rough-stone. As the user alters the orientation of the diamond, it solves optimization problems to scale and position the diamond within the rough-stone.

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  • Impact of PCV7 on antibiotic susceptibiity of nasophayngeal Streptococcus pneumoniae in South Auckland children

    Sekikawa, E; Trenholme, A; Taylor, S; Lennon, Diana; McBride, C; Best, Emma (2011-03-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cell proliferative and radioprotective properties of bioactive Salvia sclareoides extracts

    Ruivo, D; Silva, FVM; Rauter, AP; Justino, J; Goulart, M (2008-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Blob - Slicing and dicing in Oracle

    Mustatea, Nicoleta; Jansen, Peter (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    At The University of Auckland Library we successfully tried another approach in demystifying the BLOB: slicing it in Oracle by employing existing functions in Voyager. All we have done is to invoke these functions into our SQL statements and in no time at all we obtain the information we want. We can run these queries in 3 different environments: ???? Oracle???s own SQL+ ???? Microsoft Access (in Pass-through Queries) ???? SQL Server 2000 The advantages of using this approach are: Speed of execution Data extraction is server side therefore independent of Microsoft Access VB. Possibility to schedule the query to run at fixed intervals. (in SQL Server) The simplicity of using what is already in the Voyager database is making this melange of Oracle and SQL server queries not only chic but also efficient.

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  • Characterisation of the Genetic and Hormone controls of Branching in Petunia

    Simons, Joanne; Templeton, K; Plummer, K; Beveridge, C; Snowden, K (2004-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • What drives bacterial community structure in stream biofilms?

    Roberts, Kelly; Lear, Gavin; Turner, Susan; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    BACKGROUND The microorganisms within biofilms are the key basal trophic level within most freshwater systems. However, microbial structure, function and succession in natural stream systems remain poorly understood. This research characterises the biofilm community structure of stream biofilms experiencing different anthropogenic impacts and how they change over time. Our aim is describe the changes in bacterial biofilm communities over time and to investigate what drives these changes.

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  • Cardiac response to weak electrical shocks challenges the functional syncytium paradigm

    Caldwell, Bryan; Trew, Mark; Pertsov, AM (2015-04-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Wind power in New Zealand Renewable energy resource dynamics in a hydro-based power system

    Suomalainen, Anna-Kristiina; Pritchard, G; Sharp, Basil; Yuan, Z; Zakeri, G (2013-12-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • CellML: Cellml.org, Tools and Community

    Lawson J.; Lloyd C.; Noble P.; Hunter P.; Nielsen P. (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Poster presented at ICSB2007 The purpose of CellML is to store and exchange computer-based mathematical models of as wide a range of scale and subject as posssible. For example, biochemical signalling and metabolic systems can be embedded in electrophysiological models of excitable cells in CellML. The CellML language is an open standard based on the XML markup language and is being developed by the Bioengineering Institute at the University of Auckland and affiliated research groups [1]. The majority of computational biology publications aim to discuss their model but often fail to provide a comprehensive set of instructions for recreating the model, or include errors preventing reproduction of published model outputs. Publishing a paper with a link to a CellML model facilitates the wide distribution and recreation of that model, and additionally forces the modeller to carefully consider matters such as unit consistency. The CellML specification and application programming interfaces (API) are driven by a core team, but a growing international community is involved in work related to CellML. A community website (www.cellml.org) has been set up as a focal point for the community and also functions as a model repository. A number of groups are developing software tools for CellML and using the language for research in computational biology. A repository of almost 300 unique CellML models is available at www.cellml.org/models: these are computational models from peer-reviewed publications that have been coded into CellML. These models are undergoing an active curation process based on the MIRIAM standard, proposed by the international biological modelling community [2]. This process includes provision of comprehensive documentation, annotation with citation and model author metadata, maintenance of file modification histories, and correspondence with model authors to ensure that models define all required initial conditions and parameters. The CellML community strongly supports collaboration with other groups to continue to set standards for curation and distribution of biological models. A number of free / open source software tools for developing and simulating CellML models are available, including Physiome CellML Environment (PCEnv) and Cellular Open Resource (COR). Other modelling environments such as JSim and Virtual Cell also support the CellML format. Information on further tools such as validators, debuggers and simulation specific packages can be found at www.cellml.org/tools. In the near future, models in the cellml.org model repository will be completely annotated with ontologies such as BioPaX and references to databases such as UniProt. Models will be broken down into the components from which they are comprised, and these components will themselves be curated, providing a toolbox of standardised computational parts from which new models can be created, in an in silico analogy to the MIT Registry of Standard Biological parts (http://parts.mit.edu/registry/index.php/Main_Page). An API has recently been developed for software tools to allow interaction between CellML and SVG diagrams of models, such as biochemical pathway schematics, and work is also underway to standardise graphical representations of CellML models. For more information, please join the CellML community mailing list at http://www.cellml.org/mailman/listinfo/cellml-discussion. 1.) Cuellar, A.A., Lloyd, C. M., Nielsen, P. F., Bullivant, D. P., Nickerson, D. P., Hunter, P. J. "An Overview of CellML 1.1, a Biological Model Description Language" Simulation, 2003, 79, No. 12, 740-747 2.) Le Novere, N., Finney, A., Hucka, M., Bhalla, U.S., Campagne, F., Collado-Vides, J., Crampin, E.J., Halstead, M., Klipp, E., Mendes, P., Nielsen, P., Sauro, H., Shapiro, B., Snoep, J.L., Spence, H.D., Wanner, B.L. "Minium information requested in the annotation of biochemical models (MIRIAM)" Nature Biotechnology, 2005, 23 1509-1515

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  • Can tree weta detect terrestrial bats

    Lomas, Kathryn; Field, LH; Wild, John; Kubke, Maria; Parsons, Stuart (2008-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Interactions between insects and bats are well-known examples of predator-prey co-evolution. For example, moths have evolved hearing abilities that allow them to respond to sounds in the ultrasound range, thus enabling them to detect the echolocation calls of hunting bats and perform evasive manoeuvres (Roeder 1998). Although New Zealand insects are preyed upon by endemic bats, no studies have examined whether they possess similar strategies for predator avoidance. If auditory information is used to detect and avoid predation, then the frequencies of greatest sensitivity of the auditory organ are predicted to correspond to the echolocation frequency (or other hunting-related sounds) produced by predatory bats. New Zealand has two endemic bats, the long tailed bat (Chalinolobus tuberculatus) and lesser short tailed bat (Mystacina tuberculata). Long tailed bats are typical aerial insectivores and are not known to prey on weta.

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