13,024 results for The University of Auckland Library, Journal article

  • Equitable Estoppel in New Zealand: Wilson Parking New Zealand Ltd v Fanshawe 136 Ltd

    Roberts, Marcus (2016)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cost of government and firm value

    Firth, M; Gong, Xihe; Shan, L (2013-06)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Do high expenditures incurred in running the government benefit or hurt firms? Using Chinese data between 1999 and 2006, we find that higher administrative expenditures in provincial governments are associated with lower firm value, lower stock and financial performance, and lower labor productivity. Local governments that spend more on public administration tend to collect more fees from companies and spend less on social welfare and infrastructures. Our evidence is consistent with the “grabbing hand” hypothesis and has important policy implications.

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  • An experimental study on a novel cold-formed steel connection for light gauge open channel steel trusses

    Ahmadi, Amin; Mathieson, C; Clifton, George; Das, R; Lim, James (2016-07)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper describes an experimental investigation on a novel hollow connector, to be referred to as the Howick Rivet Connector (HRC). The HRC is of diameter of 12.75 mm and thickness of 0.95 mm and can be used to connect cold-formed steel channel-sections with a gap, such as found in the connection arrangement of cold-formed steel trusses and seismic framing units. Laboratory tests on twenty-seven Tee-stub specimens that use the HRC are described; for comparison, another twenty-seven Tee-stub specimens are also tested that use standard bolts. In the laboratory tests, the effect of three different thicknesses of channel-sections and three different end distances are investigated. It is shown that the behaviour of the HRC Tee-stubs is similar to that of the bolted Tee-stubs, but possess a higher capacity and an improved ductility, as shown by a longer yield plateau once the connection becomes inelastic. It recommended that a minimum end distance of 1.5 times the diameter of the HRC is sufficient. Design equations that can be used to predict the bearing strength of the HRC Tee-stubs are proposed; for these equations, the index of reliability calculated was greater than the recommended 3.5.

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  • Errors in NOF meta-analyses of calcium and vitamin D supplements

    Bolland, Mark; Avenell, A; Grey, Andrew; Reid, Ian (2016-08)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Archaeological and Palaeoenviromental Investigations Near Aitape, Northern Papua New Guinea, 2014

    Golitko, M; Cochrane, Ethan; Schechter, EM; Kariwiga, J (2016)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The mid-Holocene period (ca. 7000–3000 BP) in the southwestern Pacific witnessed the activation of wide-ranging networks connecting the north coast of New Guinea and off-shore islands, possibly driven by rising population density as favourable coastal environments developed after the mid-Holocene marine highstand. Yet finding actual evidence for human occupation dating to this period in New Guinea has proven extremely challenging. We report on the results of recent fieldwork carried out to examine areas of potential mid-Holocene settlement near the modern town of Aitape. Our survey and excavations provide minor evidence for mid-Holocene settlement, but we find no evidence for obsidian or other long distance imports suggesting connection to other parts of the Pacific during this time. It remains uncertain whether this absence reflects prehistoric reality or the difficulties inherent in finding archaeology of mid-Holocene age on a coastline impacted by significant morphological change during the intervening millennia.

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  • Geothermal barriers, policies and economics in Chile – Lessons for the Andes

    Sanchez-Alfaro, P; Sielfeld, G; van Campen, Bart; Dobson, P; Fuentes, V; Reed, A; Palma-Behnke, R; Morata, D (2015-11)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Andes is the largest undeveloped geothermal region in the world. The Chilean case is the most puzzling because the country is largely dependent on imported fuels causing, among other issues, high energy prices and energy dependency. But even though it has large quantities of geothermal resources which have been explored since the 1920s, no geothermal power plant has been constructed yet. The barriers for geothermal development in Chile have not been studied in detail and limited information is available about the real economic feasibility of geothermal power generation and whether effective incentives are needed for its development. In this study we present an integrated analysis of geoscientific, economic, historical and regulatory aspects of geothermal development in Chile based on the compilation of new and previously published data. Through a survey of key participants from government institutions, industry and academia we identified the main perceived advantages, barriers, and efficient incentives. The absence of clear medium-to-long term energy policies and a lack of government incentives for companies to overcome financial risk are perceived as the main barriers. Additionally, we calculated the estimated average Levelized Costs of Energy (LCoE) of geothermal electricity generation using different scenarios to illustrate the potential impact of possible government policies. At present conditions and without incentives we estimated a base case geothermal LCoE in Chile which would be “near competitive” compared to the average contract prices. Further analysis would be needed to estimate the effect of different policy incentives more rigorously. Finally, we propose some guidelines for geothermal stakeholders to encourage geothermal power development; these might prove useful to other Andean and developing countries as well.

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  • Denosumab after 8 years

    Reid, Ian (2015-12)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • International compensation practices: a ten-country comparative analysis

    Lowe, Kevin; Milliman, J; De Cieri, H; Dowling, PJ (2002-03)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This article presents a comparative study of compensation, by exploring nine items which measure pay and benefits practices in ten locations (nine countries and one region). First, similarities and differences in employee compensation are examined. Second, emerging issues for international compensation are identified. Third, gaps are identified between current practice and employee preferences for future compensation. Overall, the results of this study provide some support for previous research, although a number of counterintuitive findings are identified with respect to the ways in which culture might be expected to impact employee preferences for cross-cultural compensation practices. The research suggests several challenges for compensation practice and directions for future research.

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  • A Realpolitik Europeia

    Silva, Pedro (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    O artigo analisa o papel dos interesses dos Estados na evolução da União Europeia, debatendo o seu impacto no aprofundamento da Política Comum de Segurança e Defesa.

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  • Tree fern ecology in New Zealand: A model for southern temperate rainforests

    Brock, James; Perry, George; Lee, William; Burns, Bruce (2016-09-01)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Tree ferns are a ubiquitous and often locally dominant element of wet southern temperate rainforests across Australasia, southern Africa and in regions adjacent to the tropics in South America. Published data on the ecology of tree ferns throughout these forest ecosystems is piecemeal, with the most comprehensive literature describing the ecology of tree ferns coming from New Zealand. Therefore using New Zealand forests as a model system, we review the ecology and importance of tree ferns for forest structure and composition. Most studies of the ecology and function of forest species in New Zealand have focussed on spermatophytes. Even though tree ferns (Cyatheaceae, Dicksoniaceae) can represent more than 50% of basal area and more than 20% of forest biomass they have been largely overlooked and quantitative information on their contribution to forest structure and function is relatively scarce. Here for the first time we synthesise information on NZ’s indigenous tree ferns published over the last 100 years and present new data on their ecology and potential ecosystem influences. Irradiance and nutrient (N, P) levels constrain development of tree fern gametophytes, with P limitation potentially influencing sporophyte production. Tree ferns establish during temporary removal of forest canopies across various spatio-temporal scales including after local disturbances, wind-throw openings of the canopy, and landslides. Members of the Cyatheaceae exhibit spatial differentiation along temperature and solar radiation gradients; the Dicksoniaceae species differentiate most strongly on their frost tolerance. Frequency/abundance of all nine understory tree fern species indigenous to New Zealand increases with total soil phosphorus, with some niche differentiation among species along a broader nutrient gradient. Tree ferns are prominent in early and mid-successional forest communities where they may persist for more than 250 years. Individually, and as a group, tree-ferns impact nutrient cycling, organic matter accumulation and ground-level irradiance, often shading out tree seedlings. Tree ferns also have long-term physical impacts on the regeneration niche of associated species, with epiphytism on tree fern trunks providing alternative establishment surfaces for many species. Domination of nutrient resources by tree ferns early in succession is likely a key factor influencing community establishment. We conclude with key recommendations for future research on fundamental unknown elements of the ecology and synecology of tree ferns including greater determination of their ecophysiology and influence on forest community assemblages.

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  • What Can Electronic Anesthesia Records Tell Us about Resident Competence?

    Weller, Jennifer (2016-02)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Re: Antenatal corticosteroids: a time for more careful scrutiny of the indications? The most reliable evidence is reassuring

    Harding, Jane; Dalziel, SR (2016-09)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Alcohol and ischaemic heart disease: probably no free lunch

    Jackson, Rodney; Broad, Joanna; Connor, Jennie; Wells, Linda (2005-12-03)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Oral Breakdown of Texturally Complex Gel-Based Model Food

    Larsen, DS; Tang, J; Ferguson, Lynnette; James, Bryony (2014)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of textural complexity on the oral breakdown foods. Varying levels of textural complexity were ‘built-in’ to gel-based model foods by embedding edible inclusions into layers. Complexity was quantified using instrumental and sensory assessment which confirmed textural complexity increased with increasing structural complexity for these models; 3 levels of complexity were developed (low(LC), medium(MC) and high(HC)). 20 subjects chewed and expectorated the model foods at the point of swallow with samples also collected at different stages during the chewing cycle. Textural complexity of the model foods did not significantly impact on oral transit time, as there were no significant differences between chewing time, number of chews and chewing rate. Control of oral transit time is critical if these model foods are to be used for further research into a hypothesised textural complexity-satiation link. The textural complexity of the HC samples produced a significantly different oral breakdown pathway to the LC and MC samples. During the initial stages of chewing, the HC samples broke down into a significantly greater number (p< 0.05) of significantly smaller particles (p< 0.05), many of these particles were the embedded inclusions released from the gel matrix. The greater number of particles of smaller sizes present throughout the chewing cycle, coupled with variation in hardness between layers, correlated to sensory perception of a greater number of texture elements by the consumer.

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  • Development of an Assessment Tool for Team Integration in Alliance Projects

    Che Ibrahim, Che; Costello, Seosamh; Wilkinson, Suzanne (2015)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    There is a common belief that if continuous improvement in alliance projects is to be achieved through the use of integrated teams, then a rational means of assessing how well teams integrate and how team integration changes over time, needs to be introduced. However, few, if any, studies have focused on developing a systematic approach to measuring alliance team integration. In response to this need, an assessment tool for measuring alliance team integration has been developed in this research. The theoretical framework of key indicators (KIs) of team integration in construction projects is firstly identified through a literature review and then validated with a construction peer group, which resulted in 17 potential KIs being identified. Based on the identified KIs, a quantitative and a qualitative methodology (mixed methods research) was employed, with seventeen experienced road construction alliance practitioners participating in four rounds of a Delphi questionnaire to identify the KIs of team integration specifically for alliance teams. An analysis of the survey results revealed the seven most significant KIs of alliance team integration. These KIs are (1) team leadership; (2) trust & respect; (3) a single team focus on project objectives and Key Results Areas (KRAs); (4) collective understanding; (5) commitment from project alliance board; (6) creation of a single & co-located alliance team; and (7) free flow communication. The resulting conceptual performance index model, the Alliance Team Integration Performance Index (ATIPI) was then developed, based on the identified KIs and their relative significance. Then, by means of face-to-face interviews, followed by two rounds of a Delphi questionnaire, the appropriate quantitative measures (QMs) for each KI were identified to provide objective and quantitative measures, for inclusion in the ATIPI. Finally, a range of scales for five performance levels, from poor to excellent, were established by conducting an empirical questionnaire survey and applying a fuzzy set theory via modified horizontal approach with bisector error method. A computerized version of the ATIPI model was then developed in proprietary spreadsheet software, thereby providing an automated way of collecting, retrieving and presenting graphically data to assist in managing and monitoring performance. With the aid of a panel of alliance experts, a validation study of the ATIPI was conducted and subsequently tested on alliance projects, to demonstrate the application of the assessment tool. This research study is first to develop an assessment tool to aid in the measurement of alliance team integration performance. The establishment of such a tool provides owner and non-owner participants (NOPs) with a systematic and structured approach to measure the team integration performance consistently and objectively over the life cycle of projects. Such assessment is vital for the teams to have greater insight into their performance and hence, provides a point of reference to drive continuous improvement.

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  • The last Summer Olympics? Climate change, health, and work outdoors

    Smith, KR; Woodward, Alistair; Lemke, B; Otto, M; Chang, CJ; Mance, AA; Balmes, J; Kjellstrom, T (2016-08-13)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Closure to "Clear-Water Local Scour around Pile Groups in Shallow-Water Flow" by Ata Amini, Bruce W. Melville, Thamer M. Ali, and Abdul H. Ghazali

    Amini, A; Melville, Bruce; Ali, TM; Ghazali, AH (2013-06)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Use of Model-Based Tumor-Size Metrics to Predict Survival

    Ribba, B; Holford, Nicholas; Mentré, F (2014-08)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • How ancient is art?

    Davies, Stephen (2015)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this paper I suggest that music and dance of an artful kind could pre-date the emergence of our species by several hundred thousand years. Our progenitor, H. heidelbergensis, had the necessary physiological resources and social capacities. And she inherited older modes of moving and vocalizing that could have laid the foundations for dance and music. Admittedly, for her, these artistic activities would have been more about sharing and expressing emotions than about symbolizing abstract ideas or conveying complex thoughts. But that is something for which song and dance are ideally suited. Accordingly, the common assumption made by many paleoarchaeologists in discussions of the origins of art and of psychological modernity — that art is a distinctively sapiens attribute presupposing the kind of complex mentality that may be unique to our species — is mistaken. As well, there are some philosophical morals about the nature of art to be teased from the facts of its ancient origin.

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  • Opiates in Enhanced Recovery After Surgery: still not convinced

    Su'a, B; Hill, Andrew (2015-11)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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