1,487 results for The University of Auckland Library, Report

  • MESIF: A Two-Hop Cache Coherency Protocol for Point-to-Point Interconnects (2009)

    Goodman, James; Hum, HHJ (2009)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    We describe MESIF, the first source-snooping cache coherence protocol. Built on point-to-point communication links, the protocol maintains no directory, and mimics the broadcast behavior of a snooping cache protocol. MESIF supplies data cached in other nodes in a single round-trip delay (2-hop latency) for all common operations. Because of the speed of the links, the protocol can outperform a bus-based protocol for a small number of nodes, but scales through hierarchical extension to a large-scale multiprocessor system. Salient features of the protocol are described. The introduction of a novel forwarding state is used to assure a single response to shared data and to simplify conflict resolution. In the hierarchical extension, auxiliary hardware data structures can be included to provide 2-hop latency for most operations. The recently revealed Intel® Quick-Path InterconnectTM protocol is derived from MESIF. Some design differences are highlighted.

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  • Interactive Decision Support in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    Ehrgott, Matthias; Winz, Ines (2006)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper proposes the use of an interactive decision support system to guide the treatment planning process for external beam radiation therapy. Based on multicriteria optimisation our research treatment planning software Carina calculates efficient (also called Pareto optimal) treatment plans. These are stored in a database and accessed for evaluation by the treatment planner. The interactive component consists of navigation among the precalculated plans using free search, fine search and exact search as well as sensitivity analysis, which extracts dose dependence information for all structures from the plan database. As a result, plan quality is improved by finding advantageous trade-offs in competing treatment plans, trial-and-error is avoided, and effectiveness of treatment planning is increased.

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  • Identifying the Principal Axes of a Birefringent Material by Polarisation Classification

    Unsworth, Charles; Lesurf, J (2006)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    A novel use of a 'Rotary Polariser Quasi-Optical System' to locate the principal axes of a birifringent material is presented. It will be demonstrated that by examination of the ellipticity of the beam, one can determine the orientation of such principle axes and hence optimize the performance of Faraday Rotators.

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  • Observation of frequency dependent Faraday angle resonance in ferrites & new ellipticity characterisation of freespace Faraday rotators at mm-wavelength

    Unsworth, Charles; Lesurf, James (2006)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    This article, reports ‘Frequency Dependent Faraday Angle Resonance’ in a magnetic sample at millimetric frequencies for the first time using a fully automated rotary polariser quasi-optical system. This serves to compliment the original work performed by Raum at Terahertz frequencies in the Frequency independent region of a magnetic material. In addition, it is shown how the same instrument can be used further classify the performance of a Freespace Faraday Rotators, by the introduction of a new ‘ellipticity’ parameter measurement. This serves to identify what physical mechanism is responsible for the isolation that occurs across the device’s operating region, hence, providing a further insight into the operation of the device.

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  • A fully automated quasi-optical, rotary polariser system for use at MM-wavelengths

    Unsworth, Charles; Lesurf, James (2006)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    This article, describes the development of a fully automated rotary polariser quasi-optical system for use at millimetric frequencies. It is reported how the system can accurately measure the rotation and ellipticity that may be induced on a linearly polarised Gaussian Beam when it passes through a magnetic material under study with ~1% error. The system is demonstrated by the automatic characterisation of a plastoferrite sample in approximately 6 hrs using the ‘Faraday Angle Resonance’ method. This was a significant time saving over the conventional reflectance method which would take a skilled researcher ~ 1 week to perform. It is also reported how measurement of the ‘Minor Faraday Angle’ can produce more accurate results at mm-wavelengths.

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  • The role of the board of directors in ensuring the involvment of key influence figures in strategic management

    Paddy, Rex (1981)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    The Problem Stated - 'How to involve the most senior decision makers in a regular strategic appraisal which results in a written strategy capable of guiding all major decisions of the company'. Since the early 1960's the basic concepts of corporate planning, strategic planning or strategic management have been well documented in both the academic and popular literature. The theory has not changed a great deal although the language used to express the theory has changed, the timespan has shortened (oil crisis) and the amount of quantification has decreased.

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  • An Automated Oscillator Tuning System for Gunn Oscillator Characterisation at MM-Wavelengths

    Unsworth, Charles; Lesurf, James (2006)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    This article presents an ‘Automated Oscillator Tuning System’ (AOTS) that together with mechanical motorized fixtures can be used to automatically adjust the frequency and backshort tuners of a coaxial cavity, resonant cap mm-wave oscillator via a computer program. Here we demonstrate how the AOTS can be used to quickly and accurately characterise a coaxial cavity, resonant cap mm-wave oscillator with frequency increments of 100MHz. The oscillator characterisation took 10 minutes with the AOTS as compared to 1hr+ minutes if performed manually and with larger frequency increments. By writing an appropriate computer control program, the AOTS can be adapted to many types of application. Thus, the AOTS has the potential to be versatile with wide functionality.

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  • Protecting telecommunications networks : toward a minimum-cost solution

    O'Sullivan, Michael; Walker, C; O'Sullivan, M. L.; Thompson, T. D. (2004)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    The problem of designing fibre-optic networks for telecommunications can be decomposed into (at least) three non-trivial subproblems. In the first of these subproblems one must determine how many fibre-optic cables (fibres) are required at either end of a street. In the next subproblem a minimum- cost network must be designed to support the fibres. The network must also provide distinct paths from either end of the street to the central exchange(s). Finally, the fibre-optic cables must be placed in protective covers. These covers are available in a number of different sizes, allowing some flexibility when covering each section of the network. However, fibres placed within a single cover must always be covered together for maintenance reasons. In this paper we describe two formulations for finding a minimum-cost (protective) covering for the network (the third of these subproblems). This problem is a generalised set covering problem with side constraints and is further complicated by the introduction of fixed and variable welding costs. The first formulation uses dynamic programming (DP) to select covers along each arc (in the network). However, this formulation cannot accurately model the fixed costs and does not guarantee optimality. The second formulation, based on the DP formulation, uses integer programming (IP) to solve the problem and guarantees optimality, but is only tractable for smaller problems. The cost of the networks constructed by the IP model is less than those designed using the DP model, but the saving is not significant for the problems examined (less than 0.1%). This indicates that the DP model will generally give very good solutions despite its limitation. Furthermore, as the problem dimensions grow, DP gives significantly better solution times than IP.

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  • Improving the Efficiency of Genetic Algorithms for Linearly Constrained Optimization

    Vossner, Seigfried; O'Sullivan, Michael; Kausch, Ulrich (2003)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    The efficiency of a Genetic Algorithm for constrained parameter optimization depends heavily on the ratio of feasible to infeasible area in its rectangular search space. We show an algorithm based on existing mathematical programming methods which improves this ratio assuming a set of linear constraints. We approximate the feasible area by a multidimensional ellipsoid and rotate the original search space parallel to its main axes. The minimum volume hyper rectangle we can wrap around the rotated constraint set gives us a new rectangular search space. In addition to that we propose to continue with a local search algorithm for fine tuning. To demonstrate the use of the proposed method, we perform test runs on randomly generated cases as well as on three selected examples.

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  • The involvement of the directors in stategic management in New Zealand's ten largest companies

    Paddy, Rex (1983)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper arose out of my previous work "The Role of the Board of Directors in Ensuring the Involvement of key influence figures in Strategic Management")The motivation remained one of how to implement the process of Strategic Management at the most senior levels of major Public Companies. The technology is well documented, the buzz words have slipped easily into Chairmans' reports and my previous research indicated an almost total acceptance of the philosophy of Strategic Management by the directors of New Zealand's ten largest Public Companies. This current research was designed to determine if a gap existed between the theory as accepted by the directors and the practice in the companies they controlled. However, what was being measured was still the directors own perceptions of the degree of their involvement in Strategic Management. In an attempt to balance this, identical questionnaires were sent to each Company Secretary and the senior executive responsible for planning. I also had serious doubts whether the respondants ascribed the same meaning to the terminology of Strategic Management as the academic writers and I therefore interviewed two of the Chairmen to attempt to measure their depth of understanding of the Strategic Management process. This was an extremely valuable input to my understanding and also provided essential insights into the practical functionings of the board room.

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  • Modelling of Charles Darwin earthquake reports as catastrophic wave phenomena

    Galiev, Shamil Usmanovich (2009)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    As it is the 200th anniversary of Darwin’s birth, 2009 has also been marked as 170 years since the publication of his book Journal of Researches, commonly referred to as The Voyage of the Beagle. During the voyage Darwin landed at Valdivia and Concepcion, Chile, just before, during and after a great earthquake which demolished hundreds of buildings, killing and injuring many people. It was a giant natural catastrophe. He saw the land rise before his eyes. Land was waved, lifted and cracked, volcanoes awoke and giant ocean waves attacked the coast. There are two main goals of this book. The first is emphasising the priority of Darwin in the description and the analysis of the results of the severe earthquakes (Chapter I). Extracts from Darwin’s Diary and Narrative 2 , ‘Journal of Researches’ and ‘The autobiography of Charles Darwin’ are presented. In the extracts Darwin described a few days of his work. Perhaps, those days were among the most important days of his life. We group the material of the extracts so that a reader can trace the evolution of Darwin’s thoughts. The key observations and ideas of Darwin, presented in the material, are shortly formulated. Then these ideas are analysed and compared with modern experimental and theoretical data. In particular, Darwin wrote ‘… the whole body of the sea retires from the coast, and then returns in great waves of overwhelming force...’, ‘ …Santa Maria was upheaved nine feet…’ (Santa Maria is the island), ‘… the displacement at first appears to be owing to a vorticose movement beneath each point thus affected;…’. Taking into account Darwin’ key ideas we construct the mathematical models of natural catastrophic phenomena. Chapter II is devoted to catastrophic ocean waves. The Lagrangian description is used. Highly nonlinear wave equations are derived, which describe the evolution of the waves propagating over a variable depth. An attention is focused on the transresonant evolution of periodic ocean waves, catastrophic waves and tsunami. An appearance of extreme waves is explained by resonant effects. The theory of uplift, loosening and rupture of weakly cohesive geomaterials, gassy soils and magma under sharp decompression within tension seismic waves is developed in Chapter III. In particular, our attention was attracted by Darwin’ words ‘… a severe earthquake, may, I think, be attributed to the disturbance of mud containing organic matter…’. Because of the global warming the mathematical description of properties of gassy liquids and soils becomes more and more timely. The last Chapter is devoted to Nonlinear Science problems, in particular, to the evolution of initially smooth wave motion into vortex motion, and turbulence. This evolution can take place in many layered systems: ground, ocean, air and plasma. The generation of elastica (mushroom)-like waves, surface drops and jets, vortices and turbulence is simulated by the same highly nonlinear wave equation. The transresonant evolution of highly nonlinear waves is studied. The transition to turbulence of these waves is modelled. It is emphasised that respectively simple nonlinear wave equations can describe wide spectre of catastrophic wave phenomena.

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  • Australasian connections and new directions : proceedings of the 7th Australasian Archaeometry Conference

    Jones, Martin (Editor); Sheppard, Peter (Editor) (2001)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    From Back Cover. The 7th Australasian Archaeometry Conference was held at the University of Auckland from February 5th to the 9th 2001 under the auspices of the Centre for Archaeological Research and the Department of Anthropology. There were 81 full conference delegates in attendance from 10 countries and 61 papers were presented in 7 different sessions covering all the major areas of current research in archaeometry and archaeological science. Thirty three of the papers presented are contained in these proceedings. From Antarctica to Japan and from DNA to stone tools, this volume provides a useful overview of the issues, geographical areas and scientists who are leading archaeometric research in the greater Pacific region. In particular the volume speaks of the important and lively cooperation that exists between archaeology and the physical and biological sciences in Australasia.

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  • A polymath anthropologist : essays in honour of Ann Chowning

    Gross, Claudia; Lyons, Harriet D.; Counts, Dorothy (2005)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    This volume honours Ann Chownings contributions to anthropology as a whole and to the anthropology of Melanesia in particular. It reflects the scope of her interests by bringing together a wide range of scholars and topics. A biographical narrative (by Judith Huntsman) of her life to date traces her career and there is a comprehensive bibliography of her works (Kathryn Creely). The essays deal primarily with issues in Oceania, except for two addressing one of her favourite pasttimes detective fiction, as a source of innovative word formation (Laurie Bauer) and its parallels to ethnography (Claudia Gross). Three archaeology essays discuss stone artefacts in Papua New Guinea (Pamela Swadling, Jim Specht, Susan Buhner), and one essay surveys dental morphology in Oceania (Daris R. Swindler). Essays in linguistics range from surveys of Oceanic plant names (Malcolm Ross), Proto Micronesian (Ward II. Goodcnough) and Proto Oceanic (Andrew Pawley) to detailed analyses of the languages of Tokelau (Robin Hooper) and Aneityum (John Lynch). The largest section consists of essays in socio-cultural anthropology, combining themes that have been the focus of Ann Chowning's work: marriage and social organisation, gender and sexuality, social and economic change, leadership, religion, myth and human-animal relations. These essays include a survey of anthropology in Oceania (Harriet D. and Andrew P. Lyons) and cover Polynesia (Phyllis Herda, Judith Huntsman, Penelope Schoeffel), New Zealand (Joan Metge, Julie Park), the Solomon Islands (Christine Dureau) and Papua New Guinea (John Barker, Mark Busse, Michael Monsell-Davis, Mark Mosko, Maev O'Collins, Marilyn Strathern). There are also essays recollecting Ann Chowning as a teacher, colleague and friend (Jane C. Goodale, Virginia Greene, Harriet D. Lyons, Luisa Margolies, James Urry, Michael W. Young).

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  • Social Ecology of New Technologies and Haemophilia in NZ — A Bleeding Nuisance revisited

    Park, Julie; York, Deon (2008)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    This research builds on previous studies conducted by the “Living with haemophilia” researchers over the past decade in New Zealand. The current study investigates the implications of new treatments, new technologies, and changes in health care for people and families with haemophilia and those who care for them, in the context of everyday living with haemophilia. The research design used semi-structured face-to-face interviews and/ or telephone interviews with 37 people, and participantobservation at a range of haemophilia gatherings. We asked people to share with us their perceptions and/ or experience of prenatal genetic diagnosis, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, gene therapy, and new treatments for hepatitis C, as well as their everyday experiences with haemophilia. The study design and the reasons we undertook it are described in the introduction. The first substantive section highlights the everyday issues of living with haemophilia as a bleeding disorder. The second discusses the organisational ecology of haemophilia. The third traverses issues concerning haemophilia as a genetic disorder, passed down the generations, and the final section explores the presence of hepatitis C in the haemophilia community. In the conclusions we note that there are still some difficulties around the timely diagnosis of haemophilia. However, treatment for many people has changed from on-demand to prophylaxis and from the provision of blood products to recombinant products. These technologies have had significant effects on perceptions of the seriousness of haemophilia, on the safety of products, on daily living, and on relationships with the treatment sources: from products made from donations, to those manufactured by multinational pharmaceutical companies. There was a high level of awareness of the costs of treatment, compared to the earlier studies. The formation of a National Haemophilia Management Group, which was a result of years of work between the Haemophilia Foundation of New Zealand (HFNZ), medical experts, and Ministry of Health officials, was a very welcome development in 2006. The HFNZ continues play an important part in many people’s lives. Despite a continuing emphasis on women as carriers, there is a greater realisation that men, too, pass on haemophilia, and that women can suffer from bleeding problems. Parents were exercised by the timing of when to tell their daughters about their carrier status, but carrier testing very seldom incurs the long delays of earlier years. Issues around carrying haemophilia on and reproductive choice are handled with great care in this community. A wide range of views were encountered, tempered by respect for the positions of others. Discussion of gene therapy was a little passé in this community, as it had been on an ever-moving horizon for many years, and because new alternative treatments were seemingly offering considerable benefits. However, gene therapy was not dismissed as a future possibility. Hepatitis C has had important effects on this community and on the individuals within it: effectively there is a hep C generation and a post-hep C generation. It was heartening that those undergoing the most recent form of treatment appeared to be experiencing better outcomes, although the treatment itself was gruelling. At the end of this research period, a Government announcement of acknowledgement, compensation and treatment was made, fulfilling a decade and a half of struggle for recognition of harm.

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  • Oceanic music encounters : the print resource and the human resource : essays in honour of Mervyn McLean

    Moyle, Richard (editor) (2007)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    Mervyn Evan McLean, teacher, mentor, researcher and archivist, is the worthy recipient of this set of essays. Oceanic Music Encounters - the Print Resource ano" the Human Resource. The authors include colleagues and former students of an academic who was a practising ethnomusicologist only three years after the term was coined. Although most of his university career was spent at the University of Auckland, Mervyn's influence in the fields of Pacific music research and archiving were such that the contributions in this volume arc the result of both distant reputation and personal acquaintance. The volume is the product of the Study Group on Musics of Oceania within the International Council for Traditional Music, of which Mervyn has been a member for many years. The volume title is intended to encompass the span of Mervyn's professional interests, which include the role of archives in Oceanic music research and performance; material culture collections in music research and performance; the role of transcription in music research and performance; the importance of bibliographic research in tracing the connections between the past and the present; the significance of collaboration in research, particularly with scholars in other disciplines, and its significance to performance; and the colonial encounter and its implications for historical and contemporary performance.

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  • Usability and Mental Models of Google and PRIMO in the Context of an Academic Tertiary Library

    Wilkinson, Elizabeth Helen (2009)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    Library websites and search tools are a crucial interface between the user, the organisation and its resources. Most users now have easy access to other sources of information via the Internet, such as Google, and studies show the vast majority are using these in preference to library resources. The information architecture of library search tools is unfamiliar to users and is believed to constitute a barrier to usability. This is an industry-critical issue. Products have recently become available based on decoupled architecture, where the library management system is dis-integrated from the user discovery interface. One of these products is Ex Libris’ PRIMO, termed LibrarySearch at the time of this project by the University of Auckland Library, an academic tertiary library. The researcher used qualitative methods in order to gain an understanding of users’ starter frameworks and information-seeking behaviour in the contexts of mental models, usability and sense-making. The purpose was to raise providers’ awareness of their own and students’ mental models and the disparities between them, with a view to closing gaps from the providers’ side. Results indicate there is potential to improve web design, teaching, reference and other explanatory material.

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  • Growing Research in Practice: An innovative practice model

    Lunt, N; Fouche, Christa; Yates, D (2008)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    Background Growing Research in Practice (GRIP) was an innovative partnership programme which aimed to help develop a culture of enquiry among practitioners in social service agencies in Auckland by developing strategies and resources to strengthen research-mindedness and related activity. The programme ran for 15 months (January 2006-March 2007) and was overseen by a project team (consisting of Massey University grant holders and University of Auckland partners) and a practitioner advisor (the ‘critical friend’), and managed by a project manager. GRIP worked with nine social service agencies to have them explore research questions of immediate concern to practitioners. While all the projects were ultimately about improving services to clients, particularly families, they took different approaches. Various research methodologies and methods were employed.

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  • Bilingual education in Aotearoa/New Zealand: Key findings from Bilingual/Immersion Education: Indicators of Good Practice

    May, Stephen (2006)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    In 2004, researchers from the University of Waikato, led by Professor Stephen May, who is an international authority on bilingual education, looked at the national and international research on bilingual and immersion education to find out what works best in Aotearoa/New Zealand.1 This pamphlet highlights some of the key findings from Professor May’s literature review that relate to Mäori-medium education.

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  • Review of the evidence base for the national guidelines for the management of overweight and obesity

    Jull, Andrew; Lawes, Carlene; Ni Mhurchu, C; McRobbie, H; Eyles, Helen; Gorton, Delvina; Maddison, Ralph (2007)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    The Clinical Trials Research Unit (CTRU) was contracted by the Ministry of Health to: 1. Identify and appraise the existing international evidence based guidelines on the management of overweight and obesity 2. Identify and evaluate new evidence published since the publication of the most suitable guideline on the management of overweight and obesity.

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  • Adaptive Error Modelling in MCMC Sampling for Large Scale Inverse Problems

    Cui, Tiangang; Fox, C; O'Sullivan, MJ (2011)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    We present a new adaptive delayed-acceptance Metropolis-Hastings algorithm (ADAMH) that adapts to the error in a reduced order model to enable efficient sampling from the posterior distribution arising in complex inverse problems. This use of adaptivity differs from existing algorithms that tune proposals of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm (MH), though ADAMH also implements that strategy. We build on the recent simplified conditions given by Roberts and Rosenthal (2007) to give practical constructions that are provably convergent to the correct target distribution. The main components of ADAMH are the delayed acceptance scheme of Christen and Fox (2005), the enhanced error model introduced by Kaipio and Somersalo (2007) as well as recent advances in adaptive MCMC (Haario et al., 2001; Roberts and Rosenthal, 2007). We developed this algorithm for automatic calibration of large-scale numerical models of geothermal reservoirs. ADAMH shows good computational and statistical efficiencies on measured data sets. This algorithm could allow significant improvement in computational efficiency when implementing sample-based inference in other large-scale inverse problems.

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