401 results for Unitec, Conference paper

  • Gimme shelter: Tsunami mitigation as part of a permanent shelter programme for Aceh, north Sumatra

    Potangaroa, Regan (2006)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The resulting housing solutions developed for permanent shelter as part of aid packages and reconstruction often belie the complexity of their resolution. This paper briefly outlines the often hidden subtleties in such designs and in particular the complexity that “mitigation” can require. Mitigation is the accepted “notion” that any reconstruction should address former issues by reducing those perceived problems and issues. The hope is that they can be completed eliminated so that the disaster does not happen again. This may not always be achievable. The development of a permanent shelter reconstruction program for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) for tsunami victims on the west Coast of Aceh, North Sumatra is documented. And in this program the obvious mitigation need was for “tsunami proofing” of housing. Drawing on the tsunami report by Wilkinson, the paper highlights the process, design and planning considered as part of this mitigation and the practicalities of “balancing” the wishes of people to return home to sites ravaged by the tsunami against the responsibility to ensure “safe” housing (Wilkinson, 2005). The starkness of the engineering “numbers” against the social costs is compelling and the paper highlights in practical terms the difficulties sometimes faced to reduce and thus “mitigate”.

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  • Measuring the qualitative aspects of a reconstruction programme: Aceh, Indonesia

    Potangaroa, Regan (2006)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Aid Agencies are accountable for the funds that they administer and consequently there is a reporting requirement to demonstrate that any intervention (such as a permanent housing program) is beneficial to those that the Agency seeks to assist. The WHO Quality of Life Tool (WHO QLT) is one such measure of well being and has been extensively used since it was developed in 1996 (predominantly in the health sector). However, it does requires a before and after study to produce results. This is not necessarily problematic but the paper reports on the application of the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Survey tool that consists of 42 questions (hence its name DASS42) as part of a shelter program for the West Coast of Aceh following the December 2004 tsunami. The advantage of the DASS42 is that it can quantify results based on one survey (Lovibond, 1995). The DASS42 was developed at the University of New South Wales, Australia and while it enjoys wide acceptance this was the first time it was applied to a shelter program. The results from the DASS42 can be used to prioritise beneficiaries and when combined with the Disaster Life Continuum Model (rather than a 4 R Model) provides insights into the psycho-social status of beneficiaries. The paper outlines how the DASS42 was used to quantify the impact of the tsunami disaster in terms of gender, age and resilience of the Acehnese people. The survey was completed by 600 respondents at 5 different locations along the West Coast during the first two weeks of March 2005, less than 3 months after the tsunami.

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  • Leadership learning: The praxis of dilemma management

    Cardno, Carol (2006)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    No abstract available yet

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  • Rod bilong kago/rod bilong independens? Cargo cults, the colonial press and independence movements in Melanesia.

    Cass, Philip (2002)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Looks at the colonial press and independence movements in Melanesia ...

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  • Newspaper Archiving In The UAE

    Cass, Philip (2001)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper is a preliminary survey of newspaper archives and holdings in the United Arab Emirates. In order to provide an indication of the extent of the holdings available to researchers, it looks at commercial, government and university archives in the emirates of Sharjah, Dubai and Abu Dhabi. The paper also presents a brief explanation of the origins of the UAE press and compares the fate of those early newspapers with the effort being made to preserve the second generation of Emirati publications

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  • ‘Irreverent, tendentious and eagerly read:’ The role of the press in developing a political consciousness in Melanesia.

    Cass, Philip (2012)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper examines the role of the press in Anglophone Melanesia (Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Vanuau and Fiji) in developing a political consciousness among its readers in the period before independence. The paper argues that while the press was successful in creating such an awareness, it did not and has not succeeded in creating a widespread national consciousness that supercedes regional, ethnic and clan loyalties and that this has hampered the efficient functioning of the inherited Westminster model of government.

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  • Narratives of relatedness in ecological sustainability in early childhood education in Aotearoa

    Ritchie, Jenny (2010-01-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper provides an overview of the context and some preliminary findings from a current two year Teaching and Learning Research Initiative (TLRI) funded study, “Titiro whakamuri, hoki whakamua: We are the future, the present and the past: caring for self, others and the environment in early years’ teaching and learning”. Central to the study has been the recognition of interdependent inter-relatedness as expressed in kaupapa Māori notions of manaakitanga, aroha, and kaitiakitanga, as well as in the ‘ethic of care’ outlined in the work of some western educational philosophers (P. Martin, 2007; Noddings, 1994). Whilst the data gathered from the ten different early childhood centres is extensive, this paper considers that contributed from Richard Hudson Kindergarten in Dunedin.

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  • Design process: Transfer and transformation

    Wagner, Cesar; Archbold, Richard (2010)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper is drawn from research into the learning process provided by a design studio exercise where students are asked to design an extension for an iconic modernist building in Brazil. The design problem becomes an exercise in appropriate contextual response, not just to the specific site location, and local culture, but also to the architectural language and function of an existing modernist building. The Modern movement saw in Brazil not just the rising of a talented group of young architects, committed to the design and aesthetics of the new movement, but also the development of a distinctive and unique architectural language. From the 1920s onwards the possibility for the legitimacy of any architectural work appeared to be found in the scope of the object and its specific situation, and no longer in some previous classical order. This is evidence, in the case of Brazil, of the importance attributed to the locality in pre-Brasília architecture and on the healthy relationship between form and technique. Since 2007, the Brazil Studio design course at the Department of Architecture at Unitec New Zealand, has challenged students with ideas of adaptation, transformation, and appropriate responses to strong existing contexts. This paper investigates the learning process of transfer of knowledge through the analysis and transformation of a modernist masterpiece.

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  • Intentional immigrant entrepreneurs

    Cruickshank, Prue (2010-01-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

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  • The cluster approach revisited

    Kestle, Linda; Potangaroa, Regan (2010-05-14)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The UN Cluster approach came from the Humanitarian Response Review (HRR) commissioned by the UN in 2005. The intention of that review was to address apparent failures in the speed, quality and effectiveness of humanitarian responses and in addition the lack of any common basis for assessing and comparing levels of need. Levels and techniques of funding were also found to be inadequate. The Cluster Approach would identify lead organizations for typically 10 key areas or clusters such as Food and Nutrition, Water and Sanitation, Health, Emergency Shelter, Early Recovery and Reconstruction, IT Telecommunications, Logistics, Camp Management and Protection and Education (as happened in Pakistan after the 2005 Kashmir Earthquake). One of the case study areas used for the HRR was the West Darfur situation. And this paper re-visits that situation based on data collected there in June 2004 as part of testing of the Kestle Framework. The paper revisits the development and validation of that framework and then compares it to the Cluster Approach and suggests a way to move ahead by merging the framework into the Cluster Approach to produce an enhanced more robust approach.

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  • “Should I stand back, or should I lead?” Developing intentional communal cultures of emergent and distributed forms of leadership in educational settings

    Youngs, Howard (2008)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The day to day practice of leadership in education can oscillate from being a rewarding activity one moment, to one that can be littered with confusion and dilemmas the next. Leadership practice can so often lie beyond what is prescribed and standardised, every situation brings with it a uniqueness that cannot be replicated. Leadership can be individual, role-based, conjoint and extremely fluid and emergent; it can often exist in places where we are not looking for it. This paper is informed by 32 studies of distributed forms of leadership practice from around the world and focuses on the issue of intentionality and how it is related to developing communal cultures of emergent and distributed forms of leadership. On one hand, leadership can be intentionally given out to others as a means of leadership development and also as a way of coping with the intensification of work. On the other hand leadership emerges when formal leaders intentionally stand back and allow others to flourish, be they children, adolescents, adult students, parents/caregivers, or staff. Linked to this issue is the distribution of power in our educational settings, trust, and the importance of open and transparent communication.

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  • Exploring service industry culture transformation as a consequence of legislative change: The case of the Real Estate Agents Act 2008

    Davis, Robert; Crotty, Mary; Hawkins, Roger (2010)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In 2009, data was collected to explore industry transformation as a consequence of legislative change, that is, as a consequence of the Real Estate Agents Act 2008. In this paper we explore the response of key industry stakeholders to this legislation. The data consists of the qualitative interviews of 23 industry participants in Auckland, New Zealand. These participants included; industry trainers, potential and existing real estate agents as well as franchise owners and independent companies. Our analysis uses grounded theory as the mode of analysis. We also use the 4 core properties of service culture advocated by Ostrom et al., (2010) to guide our analysis. The research implications and limitations are discussed.

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  • Exploring entrepreneurship in Tonga: Factors that constrain and promote entrepreneurial activity

    Solomona, Malama; Davis, Robert; Talakai, Malia (2010-01-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In 2009, data was collected to explore entrepreneurial behaviour in the Kingdom of Tonga. 30 national experts were interviewed to understand the factors that constrain and promote entrepreneurial activity. Data collection was guided by a conceptual model that is based on the National Expert component of the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM). Our analysis of the data used grounded theory as the mode of analysis because of the lack of tested theory regarding entrepreneurship in the Pacific. The research implications and limitations are discussed.

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  • “Got any piggy sound effects? Always amusing. Oink moo quak”: Exploring consumer interactivity in response to campaigns coupling ubiquitous media

    Davis, Robert; Tiseli, Tuna (2010-01-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Consumers use mobile phones to interact with media related content. We explore their interactive response with radio content using the LOOP model that defines interactivity as: synchronicity, two-way dialogue, contingency, and control. We use the text data of 24 consumers who over a 3 year period had texted into the radio station. We found that being interactive creates a sense of belongingness to a community. The interactions between participants are symbolic of the relationship between siblings and ‘best friends’. Interactivity is driven by self congruity and the communities shared aim; co-creation of the avant-garde. They protect and must feel in control of the content but also the way the community is perceived and behaves. The interactive experience is optimized when two-way dialogue is contingent and synchronous for station, consumer and community. Involved and in control of the content and process of interactivity. The research implications are discussed.

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  • Raising the bar on self-access centre learning support

    Dofs, Kerstin; Hobbs, Moira (2010-01-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Tertiary Learning Advisors reflect on their ‘good practice’ through three key terms: utilisation, effectiveness and individual student support. We ask ourselves: Are the facilities and the advisory service support structures utilised fully? How effective is our learners’ study? What is best practice regarding the way we support our students? This article has two main sections. The first consists of a summary of individualised student support followed by two examples of practice in this area; these include an outline of three studies focusing on support for independent language learning conducted at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) from 2006 to 2009 (Dofs & Hornby, 2006; Dofs, 2009a; Dofs, 2009b), and an up-to-date description of independent language learning in the Independent Learning Centre (ILC) at Unitec. The second section comprises a progress report from a study about the current state of ILCs in New Zealand, the issues facing them, and how these might be addressed. The main themes emerging from both the research in progress, and from the authors’ own experiences, fall into two main categories: the philosophical position of independent learning/autonomous learning in the ILC within the institute, and the implications of managing a centre to be of most benefit to students. The latter were evident in the utilisation of the ILC at one of the institutions where research led to the conclusions that it is not enough to simply provide an ILC; students also have to learn how to study independently, how to use self study materials, and how to plan for their self studies, and the ILC should provide this support, in liaison with classroom teachers.

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  • Factors associated with the recovery of housing prices in Hong Kong

    Ge, X .J.; Poon, K. M.; Boon, John (2006-01-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In the period 1999 – 2004 housing prices in Hong Kong sunk to a low point in mid 2003 and then rose again. This paper investigates which factors are associated with those price movements. The paper starts by reviewing literature on housing prices including both price determinants and research methodology. Data published by the Hong Kong Government is used for the study. The housing price variables are grouped together as macro economic factors, demographic factors, housing related factors and housing supply factors. The 2-Stage Least Square (2SLS) Method of regression analysis is used in order to reduce the bi-direction effects between dependent and independent variables. Results show that economic conditions are the most important external influencers of housing prices. The model developed can be used to predict the trend of housing prices.

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  • Management of New Zealand quantity surveying practices: A longitudinal study

    Boon, John (2008-08-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This is a study of the management and strategy of quantity surveying firms in Auckland from the bottom of the property cycle in the late 1980’s to just past the next peak in 2008. Over the period the firms have developed a degree of differentiation based on the needs of clients for varying degrees of sophistication of service. This in turn leads to price differentiation. The firms who have become market leaders are all part of international groups and are able to use the expertise from within those groups to provide higher levels of sophistication of service. At the same time all firms have moved away from using contract labour and outsourcing as a means of having some flexibility in their cost structure. Because of this they may be vulnerable to incurring losses during the current downturn.

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  • Educating with certainty for future career uncertainty?

    Monteiro, Sylila; Sharma, Rashika (2010-04-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Proficiency in generic skills becomes an imperative and sustainable approach in education today, to ensure future career certainty. The impact of technological change dictates that the future will belong to the knowledge worker who embraces the concepts of lifelong learning and self-directed learning. Education of today might be obsolete tomorrow as new positions are created and existing jobs become redundant. The continued process of economic globalization challenges education as a means of achieving individual success for future career evolution. The approach to life long learning involves reconceptualising of programmes as “Living Curricula” rather than a collection of courses. Learning becomes conversations between educators, learners and the community. This requires the integration of the programs with the real world. For this to occur the programs should be genuinely dynamic, resourceful and resilient on the part of both educator and learner. This resourcefulness and resilience ensures adaptability to evolving unidentifiable job requirements in an uncertain future. The living curricula promote student competences and lifelong skills by immersing the student into current real world workplace situations in preparation for change and future career uncertainty. Interdisciplinary collaboration is essential for educators today. The programs that integrate practice-based, place-based, project-based and problem-based learning are the core of the living curricula. This holistic approach ensures the inculcation of transferable skills and equipping the learner for the on-going global challenges presented in their future careers. This paper expounds the relevance of the synthesis of knowledge, skills and competencies in the teaching and learning practices currently adopted at Unitec Institute of Technology, New Zealand as a precursor to future career evolution.

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  • The interplay of market forces and government action in the achievement of urban sustainability: The case of Auckland, New Zealand

    Boon, John (2009-04-01)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This is a case study of urban intensification in the central business district (CBD) of Auckland. The city is the commercial centre of New Zealand with a population of 1.3m. It is a sprawling city with low population density and a high dependency on private motor vehicles for transport. Auckland has recognised the need to contain urban growth within its existing urban perimeter and achieve greater intensification. Progress has been made in this regard within the CBD where significant growth in inner city residents is evident. This has been achieved through private developers reacting to market demand rather than through public sector initiatives. The availability of finance for development and investment is seen as a key enabling element. Tax advantages for investment in property and planning bonuses for residential development are also significant elements in the complex mix of matters that has enabled this urban intensification. However the quality of development is marginal. Services for the expanded inner city population have developed in line with growth.

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  • Generative urban design with cellular automata and agent based modelling

    Popov, Nikolay (2010)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    This paper reports on initial findings of a bigger research project that set out to explore the potential of generative algorithms in landscape architecture, urban design and architecture. The paper focuses on how urban morphologies of unplanned settlements can be modelled as emergent phenomena using parallel computing. Theoretically the research stems from Hiller’s discourse about space syntax, summarised in Section 2. The paper outlines the concepts behind generative design and illustrates the principles of Cellular Automata and Agent Based Modelling using some simple examples. The models are described in detail and their potential usefulness in design education is demonstrated. The potential of using such models in design practice is also evaluated.

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