566 results for Unitec, Journal article

  • Transferring literacy skills in the workplace

    Benseman, John (2010)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Implicit, if not explicit, in most workplace training programmes is the assumption that the knowledge and skills taught are not only internalised by the participants, but also transferred back into the workplace, with a resultant improvement in work performance by the workers and cumulatively for employers. There is, however, very little research evidence about how much this transfer of learning actually occurs and what factors might impede or facilitate this process. A recent study from New Zealand sought to provide some insights into this process. Based in Auckland, Fletcher Aluminium employs approximately 200 staff most of whom come from low-skill backgrounds. Eighty-five per cent of employees speak a language other than English (mostly Pacific languages) as their first language. This study identified a number of factors that could facilitate and impede the transfer of learning into people’s jobs. While the small sample means that it is not possible to indicate their relative importance, they still provide a useful starting point for follow-on studies.

    View record details
  • Australian journalism and war: Professional discourse and the legitimation of the 2003 Iraq invasion

    Dodson, Giles (2010)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper presents an original study of Australian journalistic professionalism as observed during the Iraq War, 2003. Through an analysis of both in-depth interviews conducted with Australian Iraq War journalists and news discourse produced by Australian journalists at Central Command and ‘embedded’ during the Iraq war, it is argued that professionalism provides the framework of intelligibility used by war journalists to produce accounts of war. Professionalism also serves as a ‘regime of truth’, through which the centrality of professional norms in journalism are articulated. The paper then demonstrates that professionalism, however, serves to justify and legitimate journalistic practice and meaning construction while obscuring the co-opted, functional role played by journalism within contemporary war administration and military strategy. Drawing on discourse analytic concepts, this paper argues professionalism operates as a form of ‘ideological fantasy’, which both militarises journalism and conversely journalises the military.

    View record details
  • The importance of letter knowledge in the relationship between phonological awareness and reading

    Blaiklock, Ken (2004-02-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Previous correlational and experimental research has found a positive association between phonological awareness and reading skills. This paper provides an overview of studies in this area and shows that many studies have neglected to control for extraneous variables such as ability, phonological memory, preexisting reading skills, and letter knowledge. The paper reports on the results of a longitudinal study that took account of these variables when examining the relationship between phonological awareness and reading for a group of children during their first two years at school. Children showed rhyme awareness before they began to read but were unable to perform a phoneme deletion task until after they had developed word reading skills. Concurrent and predictive correlations between phonological awareness scores and later reading were often significant and remained so after adjusting for verbal ability or phonological memory. Controlling for letter knowledge, however, reduced most correlations to nonsignificant levels.

    View record details
  • The continuing politics of mistrust: Performance management and the erosion of professional work

    Fitzgerald, Tanya (2008-08-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    For the past two decades schools and teachers in New Zealand and elsewhere have been the subject of and subjected to intense public scrutiny of their performance and professional activities. In effect, policy solutions have cast teacher and school performance as a ‘problem’ to be solved/resolved via the intervention of the State. Consequently, the policy remedy has been the introduction of audit mechanisms such as systems of performance management to define, regulate and control teaching and teachers. That is, the State has directly intervened in the professional work and activities of teachers based on the flawed assumption that teachers cannot be trusted and therefore require the intervention of the State and its agencies to ensure their performance is aligned with organisational objectives. And while one of the hallmarks of a profession and professional practice is adherence to a set of prescribed standards, performance management has rendered teachers accountable to the State, not professional peers. And, as this article outlines, this has served to de-professionalise teaching and teachers’ work.

    View record details
  • Nostalgia-related aspects of professional sport facilities: A facility audit of major league baseball and national football league strategies to evoke the past.

    Meyer, Katherine; Seifried, Chad (2010-01-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper focused on documenting how Major League Baseball (MLB) and the National Football League (NFL) utilize nostalgia through their sport facilities to showcase the past, present and even the future. This study involved the collection and examination of several facility elements through a facility audit. Data was collected on nostalgia inducing elements by using facility and renovation documents/blueprints and announcements, archived data, published websites, facility visits, and interaction/contact with front office employees. The collected information led the researchers to determine that MLB and NFL teams use specific strategies or tactics within their facilities to create or evoke nostalgia. Furthermore, there are opportunities for each organization to attract more live and remote spectators to their venue and organizational-sponsored events in order to establish or maintain membership in their fan nation through methods which center on enhancing the nostalgic experience.

    View record details
  • Lessons learnt from attempting to assess the evidence base for a complex intervention introduced into New Zealand general practice

    Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Horsburgh, Margaret; Bycroft, Janine; Mahony, Faith; Roy, Dianne; Miller, Denise; Donnell, Erin (2010-10)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Background and context. Currently, in New Zealand general practice, the introduction of new initiatives is such that interventions may be introduced without an evidence base. A critical role is to respond to the challenges of chronic illness with self-management a key component. The ‘Flinders Model’ of self-management collaborative care planning developed in Australia has not been evaluated in New Zealand. A study was designed to assess the usefulness of this ‘Model’ when utilised by nurses in New Zealand general practice. This paper describes the issues and lessons learnt from this study designed to contribute to the evidence base for primary care. Assessment of problems. Analysis of interviews with the nurses and the research team allowed documentation of difficulties. These included recruitment of practices and of patients, retention of patients and practice support for the introduction of the ‘new’ intervention. Results of assessment. A lack of organisational capacity for introduction of the ‘new’ initiative alongside practice difficulties in understanding their patient population and inadequate disease coding contributed to problems. Undertaking a research study designed to contribute to the evidence base for an initiative not established in general practice resulted in study difficulties. Lessons learnt. The need for phased approaches to evaluation of complex interventions in primary care is imperative with exploratory qualitative work first undertaken to understand barriers to implementation. Collaborative partnerships between researchers and general practice staff are essential if the evidence base for primary care is to develop and for ‘new’ interventions to lead to improved health outcomes.

    View record details
  • Conceptualising fun in mobile commerce environments

    Davis, Robert (2010)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Consumers use mobile commerce services to hedonically experience ‘fun’. This research explores what consumer-oriented service strategies have been adopted to enhance the fun experience. This research is a case study using grounded theory to develop the conceptual model, represented by 15 propositions, suggesting that attention be focused in three areas; content, social and self orientations. The first, relates to the way in which the service is constructed or the service content orientation. Secondly, the personal nature of the medium focuses attention on the consumer’s social orientation. Finally, the consumers’ self orientation. Managerial and research implications are discussed.

    View record details
  • The feasibility of assessing the Flinders Program(TM) of patient self-management in New Zealand primary care settings

    Horsburgh, Margaret; Bycroft, Janine; Mahony, Faith; Roy, Dianne; Miller, Denise; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Donnell, Erin (2010-12)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Introduction: The Flinders Program(TM) has been adopted in New Zealand as a useful and appropriate approach for self-management with primary care clients who have chronic conditions. The Flinders Program(TM) has not been evaluated in New Zealand settings. Aim: To assess the feasibility of undertaking a substantive long-term trial to gauge the effectiveness of primary care nurses using the Flinders Program(TM) to improve health outcomes for New Zealand populations. Methods: A pilot study was undertaken considering four components of feasibility of conducting a long-term trial: practice recruitment, participant recruitment, delivery of the intervention and outcome measures. This included comparing 27 intervention and 30 control patients with long-term health conditions with respect to change in self-management capacity—Partners in Health (PIH) scale—quality of care using the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) scale and self-efficacy across six months. Intervention participants received care planning with practice nurses using the Flinders Program(TM) in general practices, while control participants received usual care in comparable practices. Results: General practice and participant recruitment was challenging, together with a lack of organisational capacity and resources in general practice for the Flinders Program(TM). The measures of self-management capacity (PIH), quality of care (PACIC) and self-efficacy were useful and valuable primary outcome measures. Discussion: The overall findings do not support a substantive trial of the Flinders Program(TM) in primary care. Difficulties associated with participant recruitment and ability of practice nurses to undertake the Flinders Program(TM) within general practice need to be resolved.

    View record details
  • Women’s experience of ageing with a chronic condition

    Giddings, Lynne; Roy, Dianne; Predeger, Elizabeth (2007-06)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Aim. This paper is a report of a study to explore the experiences of ‘almost old’ women as they grow older while living with a chronic condition. Background. Little is known about the contextual effects of ageing and how it shapes and is shaped by a woman’s chronic illness experience. Nurses’ understanding of this phenomenon can have positive effects on how their client accesses and responds to healthcare. Method. Seven women aged between 50 and 58 years participated in this interpretive descriptive study that explored the issues of ageing with a chronic condition. Three focus groups were held between March 2003 and March 2004. Transcriptions were analyzed after each focus group. Participants were given the opportunity to respond to the findings as the analysis progressed. Findings. The experience of living with a chronic illness foreshadowed what was to come with ageing and embodied the ageing process: it was just part of their lives. Alongside this, the women now felt less out of place. Their peers were catching up and beginning to experience aspects of participants’ everyday reality. The women, however, experienced double jeopardy because ageing amplified the ongoing vulnerabilities of living with a chronic condition. Conclusion. Nurses who recognize the resourcefulness and expertise of women who live with a chronic condition can effectively be co-strategists in their helping them to age well.

    View record details
  • On performance of multicast delivery with fixed WiMAX telemedicine networks using single-carrier modulation

    Fong, Bernard; Hong, Guan Yue (2010)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    IEEE 802.16e fixed WiMAX provides a low cost solution for integrated multimedia access networks with a wide bandwidth making it particularly suitable for telemedicine applications. While a wide variety of modulation schemes are suitable for fixed wireless systems, single carrier modulations such as QAM offer advantages such as reduction in power requirements and system complexity compared to multi-carrier transmission systems. In this paper, we analyze the performance of QAM schemes used in a fixed WiMAX system that supports multicast distribution of real-time traffic for healthcare services by evaluation of system performance on a 10 GHz carrier. Results are presented by comparing the distribution of video data using QPSK and 16-QAM and bandwidth utilization is calculated for continuous data transmission in remote patient monitoring.

    View record details
  • Constructing worlds F4: An artist collective considered

    Jowsey, Susan (2011)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper investigates an artist collective that is comprised of a nuclear family, the parents and their two children. The key theme revolves around implications of power relations within this collective construct. The artist collective F4 operates between the realm of the subconscious and the analytical, in conjunction with the blend of ‘the imaginary’ and ‘the lived experience’ characteristic of the daily lives of children. This paper will within this context, explore the intrinsic relationship between process and concept; art and life within the artwork produced by the collective.

    View record details
  • Making research real: Embedding a longitudinal study in a taught research course for undergraduate nursing students

    Niven, Elizabeth; Roy, Dianne; Gasquoine, Susan; Ward, Frances; Schaefer, Barbara (2011)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Learning how and why scholarly research underpins and informs professional nursing practice is a continual challenge for undergraduate nursing students. They find the language and methods of research to be unfamiliar and unsettling. The work of educators thus becomes the process of breaking down barriers to students’ understanding of research processes and application. Such work is increasingly important in the current era of evidence based practice, where students must be competent in sourcing, critiquing and applying research to meet real clinical questions. In response, as lecturers who taught the course, Research for Health Professionals, we have reinvented how research is taught to second year undergraduate students. This article outlines our creative approach to facilitate students learning research theory and methodology by conducting a “real-life” research study in a local retirement community.

    View record details
  • Employee preferences for work-life benefits in a large New Zealand construction company

    Thurnell, Derek; Morrison, Emily Jane (2012)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The construction industry is a challenging environment in which to work, with job characteristics that are linked to work-life conflict, and it is important for its future sustainability that initiatives to support employee work-life balance are undertaken. 121 head office and site-based employees within a large New Zealand construction company rated their preferences for work-life benefits, and the results were compared with those of a similar previous (Australian) study. The most preferred work-life benefit factor (as for the previous Australian study) was found to be ‘wellness and personal development’. Results suggest that company provision of a wide variety of work-life benefits from which employees can choose during different stages in their life and career is ideal. Qualitative results suggest some work-life conflict associated with working long hours and weekend work exists. It is proposed that to attract and retain valuable employees, the New Zealand construction industry must provide useful work-life benefits, reasonable working hours, and supportive workplace cultures in line with such initiatives.

    View record details
  • Investigation of the internal functioning of the radial basis function neural network river flow forecasting models

    Fernando, Achela; Shamseldin, Asaad (2009-03)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper deals with the challenging problem of hydrological interpretation of the internal functioning of ANNs by extracting knowledge from their solutions. The neural network used in this study is based on the structure of the Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN) which is considered as an alternative to the Multi Layer Perceptron (MLPNN) for solving complex modelling problems. This network consists of an input, hidden and an output layer. The network is trained using the daily data of two catchments having different characteristics and from two different regions in the world. The present day and antecedent observed discharges are used as inputs to the network to forecast the flow one day ahead. A range of quantitative and qualitative techniques are used for hydrological interpretation of the internal functioning by examining the responses of the hidden layer neurons. The results of the study show that a single hidden layered RBFNN is an effective tool to forecast the daily flows and that the activation of the hidden layer nodes are far from arbitrary but appear to represent flow components of the predicted hydrograph. The results of the study confirm that the three neurons in the hidden layer of this model effectively divide the input data space in such a way that the contribution from each neurone dominates in one of the flow domains – low, medium or high – and form, in a crude manner, the base flow, interflow and surface runoff components of the hydrograph.

    View record details
  • Use of gene expression programing for multi-model combination of rainfall-runoff models

    Fernando, Achela; Shamseldin, Asaad; Abrahart, Robert (2012)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper deals with the application of an innovative method for combining estimated outputs from a number of rainfall-runoff models using Gene Expression Programming (GEP) to perform symbolic regression. The GEP multi-model combination method uses the synchronous simulated river flows from four conventional rainfall-runoff models to produce a set of combined river flow estimates for four different catchments. The four selected models for the multi-model combinations are the Linear Perturbation Model (LPM), the Linearly Varying Gain Factor Model (LVGFM), the Soil Moisture Accounting and Routing (SMAR) Model, and the Probability-Distributed Interacting Storage Capacity (PDISC) model. The first two of these models are ‘black-box’ models, the LPM exploiting seasonality and the LVGFM employing a storage-based coefficient of runoff. The remaining two are conceptual models. The data of four catchments with different geographical location, hydrological and climatic conditions, are used to test the performance of the GEP combination method. The results of the model using GEP method are compared against original forecasts obtained from the individual models that contributed to the development of the combined model by means of a few global statistics. The findings show that a GEP approach can successfully used as a multi-model combination method. In addition, the GEP combination method also has benefit over other hitherto tested approaches such as an artificial neural network combination method in that its formulation is transparent, can be expressed as a simple mathematical function, and therefore is useable by people who are unfamiliar with such advanced techniques. The GEP combination method is able to combine model outcomes from less accurate individual models and produce a superior river flow forecast.

    View record details
  • He tatau pounamu. Considerations for an early childhood peace curriculum focussing on criticality, indigeneity, and an ethic of care, in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Ritchie, Jenny; Lockie, Colleen; Rau, Cheryl (2011-12)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This article discusses some of the philosophical and pedagogical considerations arising in the development of a peace curriculum appropriate for use in early childhood education centres in Aotearoa New Zealand, with and by educators, parents/families and young children. It outlines contexts for the proposed curriculum, which including the history of colonisation, commitments to honouring the values and epistemologies of Māori, the indigenous people, and juxtaposes the proposed peace programme alongside current early childhood education pedagogical discourses in Aotearoa.

    View record details
  • Use of a supercomputer to advance parameter optimisation using genetic algorithms

    Fernando, Achela; Jayawardena, Amithirigala (2007-10)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Parameter optimisation is a significant but time consuming process that is inherent to conceptual hydrological models representing rainfall-runoff process. This study presents two modifications to achieve optimised results for a Tank Model in less computational time. Firstly, a modified Genetic algorithm (GA) is developed to enhance the fitness of the population consisting of possible solutions in each generation. Then the parallel processing capabilities of an IBM 9076 SP2 Computer is used to expedite implementation of the GA. A comparison of processing time between a serial IBM RS/6000 390 Computer and IBM 9076 SP2 supercomputer reveals that the latter can be up to 8 times faster. The effectiveness of the modified GA is tested with two Tank Models for a hypothetical catchment and a real catchment. The former showed that the parallel GA reaches a lower overall error in reduced time. The overall RMSE expressed as a percentage of actual mean flow rate improves from a 31.8% in a serial processing computer to 29.5% on the SP2 super computer. The case of the real catchment – Shek-Pi-Tau Catchment in Hong Kong – reveals that the supercomputer enhances the swiftness of the GA and achieves objective within a couple of hours.

    View record details
  • Ecological counter-narratives of interdependent wellbeing

    Ritchie, Jenny (2011)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper reports some insights garnered from a recent research project in Aotearoa (New Zealand) which explored possibilities for enacting ecological sustainability within early childhood education. The project was entitled: Titiro whakamuri, hoki whakamua. We are the future, the present and the past: caring for self, others and the environment in early years’ teaching and learning . The central platform for the study, which involved ten early childhood centres throughout the country, was a parallel philosophical approach of western theorising around an ethic of care, and Māori conceptualisations of inter-relatedness.

    View record details
  • The relationship between critical pedagogy and assessment in teacher education

    Keesing-Styles, Linda (2003-03)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Critical pedagogy has been debated for more than three decades and appears in many and varied constructions and characterizations. One of the key issues to be considered is the potential for implementation of critical pedagogy in institutionalised educational settings, where it has not always found a comfortable home. In this paper, the historical development of critical pedagogy is the focus of attention. Some of the central tenets are examined with a view to understanding how critical pedagogy has evolved over the years and what critiques are inherent within it or have been directed towards it. The paper then focuses on the issue of assessment, particularly in teacher education, and the possibility of incorporating some of the principles and practices of critical pedagogy in the assessment process in this setting. The work of several writers is considered in relation to the establishment of empowering processes, not only for learning, but also for assessment.

    View record details
  • Work realities: Migrants preparing for the experience of work

    Cooke, David; Brown, T. Pascal (2006)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Migrants entering cooperative work placements face layers of challenges that become apparent in scrutinizing workplace data. Drawing on authentic voice recordings of two worksites in Auckland, this paper traces three themes of workplaces: the exercise of power; the culture of the workplace; and work relations. It analyses the dynamics of a management meeting as it decides to require greater productivity from its workers. Then it describes the interactions of factory workers, focusing on its collaborative work culture and working relations. The paper derives implications for language education, especially in relation to migrant learners preparing for the workplace.

    View record details