162 results for Unitec, Unclassified

  • The old North Shore. A heritage walkway: Rahopara Pa to Campbells Bay beach

    Woodruffe, Paul; Henderson, Ian; Corbet, Rob (2011)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    There are many interesting heritage sites and buildings within what used to be called North Shore City, most of these are protected, documented, valued by the local residents and enjoyed as a destination by visitors. What this exhibition explores are four significant sites that lay just beyond the better known and documented sites of Devonport, Takapuna and Northcote. These sites are situated in Castor Bay and Campbells Bay, and are within easy walking distance from each other. The sites vary in origin from an 17th century Maori settlement, to a 21st century environmental restoration project. All the sites except one have been researched and documented to varying degrees, the one site that was not; Memorial Avenue in Centennial Park, lay neglected by the city authorities for decades until 2009 when the Takapuna Community Board commissioned the everyday collective to undertake a site analysis, this resulted in a heritage classification for the avenue being established within the new management plan for the park. This document puts forward a proposition that links all four sites together as a heritage walkway connecting to the existing NZ Coastal Walkway system that runs along the eastern bays coastline. All these sites contain, or lay adjacent to, valuable architectural or landscape features that contain important stories from the past, stories that share common ground in the rich tapestry of the old north shore.

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  • Development of a calibrated numerical computer model of the Raglan coast, bar and harbour

    Phillips, David (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Teaching narrative counselling as a transformative practice: A pilot study investigating whether student learning is akin to client experiences

    Lewis, Dorothea; Gremillion, Helen; Cheshire, Aileen (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The aims and objectives of this pilot project are to 1) develop best practices in the teaching of narrative work; 2) provide a unique and powerful lens for understanding the effectiveness of narrative therapy; and 3) identify intersections between teaching and professional practice in this field. Students in the 2009 PGDip Counselling course at Unitec were interviewed about their positive learning experiences to determine whether these experiences are akin to extant client accounts of successful therapeutic work. Similarities between these two sets of experiences would allow research on teaching practice in this field to inform understandings of effective narrative work. The researchers found that there are indeed significant similarities between these two sets of experiences. Specifically both the teaching and the practicing of successful narrative ideas entail 1) decentring “expert” knowledge; 2) centering the agency of learners (students and clients); and 3) the creation of reflective, interactive, and dialogical space. Positioning theory has emerged as a useful set of ideas for capturing these conclusions, which speak to aim/objectives #2 and #3. Aim/objective 1 will follow from publication and further research.

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  • Stained carpet: A case study of the collapse of Feltex Carpets Ltd

    Slessor, Andrew (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • The experience of women with chronic illness aged between 65 to 74 years: A qualitative participatory study

    Roy, Dianne; Giddings, Lynne (2008)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Biosecurity and weed management: Taking into account the biodiversity value of woody invasive alien plant species (invertebrate identification)

    Blanchon, Dan (2010-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • The financial effects of the adoption of New Zealand equivalents of International Financial Reporting Standards (NZ IFRS)

    Rainsbury, Liz (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Prevalence of internal parasites of Oligosoma infrapunctatum on Mokoia Island

    Schragen, Sabina; Perrott, John (2011-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    One five day trip to Mokoia Island was planned for December 2010 and successfully completed in this research period. We were able to catch 30 skinks and collect two faecal samples. However, because of heavy rain we were not able to collect any blood samples of diagnostic value. We discovered an external parasite which was identified by Allen Heath AgResearch as Neotrombicula sphenodonti . This mite has not previously been described on Oligosoma infrapuncatum and is of interest for herpetologist, entomologists and ecologists nationally and internationally. No eggs of Nematodes were discovered, the methodology for the extraction of nematode eggs from ethanol preserved faeces needs further testing to confirm that we are not seeing false negative results. Reinvestigation of previously taken blood samples revealed that there are some interesting findings which after discussing with Dr Richard Jacob-Hoff, New Zealand Centre for Conservation Medicine (NZCCM) need further investigation. Again these blood samples taken in 2008 were taken in the rain and are not of diagnostic value. John Perrott and Sabina Schragen presented the research results from 2008-2010 at the biannually conference of the Society for Research on Amphibians and Reptiles in New Zealand. The abstracts are attached and will be published in the New Zealand Journal of Zoology later this year. Please note that the discovery of the mite is not mentioned in the abstract as was found at the time of writing.

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  • Design for an energy regeneration system with an air motor in a golf cart

    Qi, Tom; Hawkins, David (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Investigation into the psychological and physical effects of participating in a mass “depopulation” operation

    Dale, Arnja (2011-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Worldwide, animal welfare investigations result in the discovery of commercial farming operations where large numbers of animals are suffering requiring quick and humane euthanasia. These events called “depopulation” operations are likely to be a traumatic experience for the personnel involved. In 2008, 13 Animal Welfare Investigation students voluntarily participated in a depopulation operation carried out by Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAF) and the New Zealand Food Safety Authority (NZFSA), performing manual euthanasia, involving a mass number of poultry (5000 chickens) conducted to mitigate current and future suffering. Questionnaire evaluation of the psychological and physical effects experienced as a result of participating in this depopulation operation was conducted. The majority of students had an experience where the euthanasia technique used did not effectively kill the chicken (77%). 62% indicated that having leather gloves, a broiler suit and a mask was helpful in detaching themselves from the situation. During the operation the following physical and emotional symptoms were experienced (moderate-extreme); emotionally switched off (77%), anger (62%), sweating (53%), physical pain (53%), disgust (46%), extreme shaking (38%), grief (38%) and had difficulty eating lunch (38%). 69% did not find that the euthanasing of the birds become easier throughout the day. 85% now view chickens differently, however none regretted participating in the operation. The majority (88%) felt that the blame for the mass euthanasia lay with the farmer and that they were “helping the animals”. During the first few days following the operation 62% experienced intrusive memories and flashbacks (moderate-extreme). Some students continued to experience emotional responses 4 months and 12 months post the operation however this was only in one or two cases.

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  • Ancient imagery: Digital visualisations of the Auckland isthmus

    Egginton, Zane (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Corrective measures: Actual and virtual interactive narrative

    Jowsey, Susan (2011)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Within the framework of the project these outcomes have been broadly addressed, however, the projects focus expanded in response to the lived experience of the fellowship at the International Studio and Curatorial Programme. The fellowship at the ISCP in Brooklyn, New York, provided a significant amount of time to devote to both the practice of art production and to the collaborative process. The nature of the artwork shifted in both concept and means of production with the result that the work now has several significant strands occurring simultaneously. These strands are interwoven but also exist as discrete practices - the interactive potential of the photograph, the object and moving image is still under exploration, but has become a key feature in all new proposals, of which currently there are proposals awaiting response in Berlin, Manhattan, Istanbul and Bulgaria. Whilst it is planned to continue to explore the potential of viewer interaction in the work, the integration of object, static image and moving image in a single installations has allowed us to broaden the narrative potential of pieces produced. Alongside the interactive body of work sits the static image, which has developed significantly, the fellowship provided an opportunity to work exclusively within a studio context, the decision not to engage in the American landscape but to situate all the portraiture in a neutral environment was planned from the outset, however, the potential of this decision to allow for image manipulate was not fully understood until approximately 3 months into the fellowship. The use of a black background has enabled digital construction and reassembling to occur, putting in flux the state of relativity occupied by the protagonists being photographed. This freedom from the landscape has two functions, it removes the image from the limitations of site specificity and it removes the impetus to perform, at any given moment the narrative, by this I mean we do not have to predetermine the relationship, rather are constructed in post production. This transformation allows imagery shot at different times to exist in temporal relativity - for example retrospectively shot imagery and contemporary images can exist in the same moment as one. To this end work can be construct work in a non linear manner and is no longer constrained by time and understanding, the narrative is now able to bend and flex in response to shifts in its telling. This mode of working reflects the interactive and iterative ideas already present in the work. The third element that has occurred is also interactive in yet another sense. It involves the addition of elements directly onto or into the surface of the photograph by ripping and stitching the surface of the image. Here found imagery, drawing, old photographs, materials such as wool, clothing, plaster, have been used to disrupt the surface of the portrait. Altering the narrative potential of the image and transforming it into a haptic experience. Each of these developments can be attributed directly to the period of sustained practice able to be achieved by the six month fellowship at the ISCP. Highlights of this time were the Open Days Event at the ISCP which is a four day event with a large Opening to which dignitaries from many different countries are invited. [There are 30 artists at the ISCP at any one time who are drawn from all over the world: Europe, America, Asia and Australia and New Zealand] The Open Days achieved for the first time last year, a listing in the New York Times, What’s On. Around 2000 people attend the open days making it an important time for meeting people and discussing the work. A widely circulated broadsheet is produced with photographs of artists work and a small statement to coincide with this event. Other highlights were being selected for an International peer reviewed Photography Exhibition to be held in Chelsea Manhattan, at the Joy Wai Gallery in the Spring of this year. A full colour A4 sized catalogue has been produced to accompany this exhibition. Work produced at the ISCP was also selected in a juried exhibition in Chicago at the ARC Gallery. [School of the art institute of Chicago] This exhibition was held in February 2011. A major quality assured exhibition showcasing the work produced during the ISCP fellowship will open at the Galleries of Contemporary Art run by the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs on the 29th of April 2011. My co-researcher Assoc. Prof Marcus Williams and myself were invited to give talks to the students at the Tisch School New York, Georgia State University and Rochester Institute of Technology, Parsons New School New York. We were interviewed by William Pym, Asia Art Pacific Magazines managing editor, for a new web based project the magazine is working on based on artists working abroad for a period of time. To be launched 2011. We participated in a number of artists projects at the ISCP, one of the key features of an international fellowship is the ability to meet and work with artist from all over the world and to maintain a relationship and network with these people. In conclusion the time spent on this fellowship was important in furthering the development of a framework for both the narrative and the integration of multi media into the working process of F4. Further to this I have been accepted to present a paper of at the 6th International Conference on the Arts in Society in May 2011 at the Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Berlin, Germany. I have just received notification of selection for the Kaunas Biennial in Lithuania, an International juried art biennial to be held in September 2011.

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  • A living curricula: Conversations about learning and teaching

    Marshall, Steven (2011-05)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Unitec New Zealand’s ‘Living Curricula’ is both an Academic Strategy and an aspiration for a unique institutional culture. The Department of Performing and Screen Arts has developed course curriculum that crosses discipline boundaries and exploits collaborative opportunity to leverage economical solutions to ever-growing sector and system constrains. A living curriculum is defined not as the information content of a program, but rather as the programs’ learning experience (Unitec, 2010). Living curricula learning experiences emphasize the links and application of theory/knowledge and work experience/practice. Knowledge is both applied in practice and drawn from practice. Therefore the process of developing a living curricula involves ‘conversations’ about enquiry, knowledge, practice, learning and teaching approaches which focus on engagement between and among learners, teachers, practitioners, communities, scholars, and with self and texts. Embedded within a ‘living curricula’ is the concept of Ako, a Maori word which means to learn, study, instruct, teach or advise. Ako describes a teaching and learning relationship where the educator is also learning from the student and where educators’ practices are informed by the latest research and are both deliberate and reflective.

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  • Our children, our choice: Priorities for policy.

    Ritchie, Jenny; Harvey, Nola; Kayes, Marianne; Smith, Carol (2014-06)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Children’s rights were invited late to the table of human rights’ discussions. Since the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCROC) in 1989, there has been growing recognition of the rights of even very young children. Aotearoa New Zealand has pledged certain rights to our children, founded in recognition of Te Tiriti o Waitangi (1840), the laws of the land, and international treaties. As well as UNCROC, we are signatories to the United Nations International Convention of the Rights of Indigenous People (2007). In addition to the most basic protected rights explicitly stated in national and international treaties and laws, there are moral imperatives to protect the most vulnerable. We live with our children in communities as much as we live in political states and interconnected economies. These children’s rights include, but are not confined to: care and protection, food, shelter, and education. Implicit in these rights is quality of life: children have the right to access such qualities and conditions as: loving and respectful care; protection from mental, emotional and physical maltreatment; nutritious food to support health and growth; access to warm, dry shelter; and access to appropriate education. In 2014, we are failing in our pledges to honour the rights of our children. The nature and quality of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECCE) provision becomes more critical as children are expected to spend ever more time in care. About Child Poverty Action Group Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) is an independent charity working to eliminate child poverty in New Zealand through research, education and advocacy. CPAG believes that New Zealand’s high rate of child poverty is not the result of economic necessity, but is due to policy neglect and a flawed ideological emphasis on economic incentives. Through research, CPAG highlights the position of tens of thousands of New Zealand children, and promotes public policies that address the underlying causes of the poverty they live in.

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  • Chaos to Capability : Educating Professionals for the 21st Century

    Hays, Jay (2015-10-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Built on two decades of research, thought, writing, and teaching, in Chaos to Capability: Educating Professionals for the 21st Century, Hays argues that a transformation in higher education teaching and learning is crucial and possible. Convincing evidence indicates that conventional university education inadequately equips graduates for the complexity, contention, and contestability they will confront upon entry into their professional careers and pressing needs locally and globally for initiative and self-direction, creativity, and collaboration. This monograph explores these insufficiencies, presents a core set of capabilities and dispositions required of professionals in the 21st Century—a curriculum for the modern age—and discusses practical issues and implications with respect to implementation. Topics addressed include (1) educating for uncertainty and unknowability, (2) the vicious-cycle, unanticipated consequences of conventional approaches to education, (3) the requisite paradigm shifts and role transitions in teaching and learning, (4) unlearning, threshold concepts, and transformational learning, and (5) the paradoxical nature of chaos and its contribution to capability-building. Key contributions include models of the learning continuum, with its portrayal of and distinctions between learning backward and learning forward, and the cube, which depicts the intersection of capabilities, dispositions, and discipline-specific knowledge and skill. Hays concludes by claiming that the attributes, meta-abilities, and dispositions catalogued in Chaos to Capability comprise a "curriculum for the unknown", the requisite repertoire of professionals and professional practice for the new millennium global world. This curriculum is attained, he suggests, not by greater quantity of content, but of more encompassing, holistic, and authentic design and delivery. Guidance provided on how to do this may help educators develop programmes more in keeping with realities of the 21st Century.

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  • More than a bridge builder

    Gong, Hong-Yu (2015)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    For around thirty years, from the early 1980s to the present day, Jack Body has been the single most powerful force in the introduction of China's multi-faceted musical culture to New Zealand. As far as I can now reconstruct the sequence, Jack came to 'discover' Chinese music through Chinese composers; he came to Chinese composers through a preoccupation with sounds. Jack's acquaintance with Chinese music started in the early 1980s, if not earlier, when, as a co-organiser of the Asia Pacific Festival and Composers' Conference, he invited Chinese composers from Taiwan (Hsu Tsang­ Houei), the United States of America (Chou Wenchung) and the People's Republic of China (Qu Wei and Ye Xiaogang) to Wellington. A most original composer, Jack'sapproach to Chinese music is intuitive rather than cerebral. He looked at China from three different perspectives: first, his fascination with Asian traditional music and the contemporary compositional scene, which led him to conduct extended fieldwork in China's south and north-west and to have frequent contact with Chinese composers of different generations and diaspora; second, his interest in ethnomusicology, which enabled him to accumulate the data that would engender creative outputs; and third, his love of documenting, which would add an archival dimension to his efforts.

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  • “Cool” Asia in a local context : East Asian popular culture in a New Zealand classroom

    Kolesova, Elena (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The central issue is not only what can every discipline learn from popular culture, but also how can popular culture become a successful tool of learning for different disciplines. The fact that it is such an attractive tool of learning for students does not make it easier to answer the question of what we, as teachers of popular culture, want our students to learn and understand when we use this powerful tool in our classroom. The course East Meets West was introduced in 2003 as a part of a suite of ‘global electives’ for all students enrolled in degree level programmes, e.g. Marketing, Business Management, Sports Management, Communication Studies etc at Unitec Institute of Technology, New Zealand. However, the majority taking the course were Bachelor of Arts [BA] students majoring in Japanese, Chinese or European languages. Some students were choosing to study Asian languages and, first of all, Japanese language to satisfy their obsession with East Asian popular culture. Japanese popular culture certainly played a key role, but interest in popular culture from other East Asian countries was equally present. Since 2010 the majority of students enrolled in this course were students enrolled in Communication Studies. Similarly to the BA students, their interest in this course was equally determined by their previous engagement with East Asian popular culture. The aim of the course has been to explore the influence of East Asian popular culture on the Western popular culture. The main emphasis was on visual popular culture, e.g. anime, film, advertising or street fashion. However, other genres or types of popular culture were also considered.

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  • The migrant and the media : maintaining cultural identity through ethnic media

    Noronha, Sandra; Papoutsaki, Evangelia (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Evidence shows that mainstream media in New Zealand does not fully address the communication needs of these ethnic groups nor does it represent them in a balanced way (Robie, 2009). This is where ethnic, migrant, diaspora media play an important and supporting role by providing an alternative to an increasingly homogenised mainstream media. For ethnic communities, access to such media gives them an avenue to understand more clearly issues affecting their community, a stronger sense of identity and social cohesion and a connection to a perceived transnational community. While there is an increasing concern that mainstream media fails to reflect migrant issues and concerns, a plethora of migrant media exists in parallel that helps fill this gap (Williamson and DeSouza, 2006). Auckland alone has a vibrant ethnic media scene with media spread across print, radio, and web. Its strong Pacific Islands population, for instance, has created a lively media scene with a strong radio and online media presence contributing to the creation of a distinctive cultural diasporic identity (Papoutsaki and Strickland, 2008). With this background, this essay explores the function of different migrant media in New Zealand drawing examples from across the board with a particular focus on Indian media. This includes traditional media (i.e. print, TV, magazine, and radio), and online media. In this, the traditional communication networks of ethnic community and religious associations and their use of web, films and events is also taken into consideration. By exploring the role, challenges and potential of ethnic media, this essay seeks to understand how these media represent the diverse voices of migrant groups, in addition to providing content relevant to their needs as migrants (i.e. content that counterbalances the mainstream host culture as it is represented in the mainstream media).

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  • Race, racism in everyday communication in Aotearoa / New Zealand

    Revell, Elisabeth; Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Kolesova, Elena (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This essay is based on theories of ‘new racism’, which explain how race and racism continue to play an integral role in our lives, but in subtle and often hidden ways. This approach informs the discussion in this essay that focuses on some of the issues that emerged from a critical collaborative autoethnographic project that explored how race is manifested in everyday communication interactions in New Zealand. The discussion, more specifically, draws on what we call here ‘conversational tact’ and its three sub-themes of ‘everyday racialised ethnic terms’, ‘the everyday racialised use of ethnic stereotypes’, and ‘everyday censorship and silence around race in conversation’. These themes have been chosen as the focus of this essay because they sit together under a larger theme that looks at the way in which people communicate race through their everyday patterns of speech and vocabulary in New Zealand and help us unmask ‘racial micro aggressions’ (DeAngelis, 2009; Sue et al, 2007).

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  • Theory U and team performance: presence, participation, and productivity

    Hays, Jay (2014)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This chapter applies Scharmer’s Theory U to team performance, productivity, and learning. Key topics covered include counterproductive thought patterns, or habits, and how they can be overcome; the complementary notions of collective presence and authenticity; and the critical contributions of shared reflection and dialogue to team learning and evolution. These and other elements of Scharmer’s Theory U enable extraordinary collaborative effort and confer team advantages in terms of innovation, competitiveness, and sustainability. Strategies presented for promoting team evolution help readers to see how Theory U might be put into practice in their respective organisations and communities.

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