18 results for University of Canterbury Library, Journal article

  • Shaking Loose the Resonances

    Eggleton, D. (2014)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Comparing Acquisition, Generalization, Maintenance, and Preference Across Three AAC Options in Four Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    McLay, L.; van der Meer, L.; Schäfer, M.C.M.; Couper, L.; McKenzie, E.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Lancioni, G.E.; Marschik, P.B.; Green, V.A.; Sigafoos, J.; Sutherland, D. (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    We compared acquisition, generalization, maintenance, and preference for three AAC options. Four children with autism spectrum disorder were taught to use (a) a manual sign, (b) a picture exchange card, and (c) a speech-generating device to request toys. Intervention was staggered across children in a delayed multiple-probe design with acquisition and maintenance compared in an alternating treatments design. Generalization to new settings and people and preference for using each option were assessed. Three of the four children reached the acquisition criterion with each AAC option in 15 to 65 trials. One child learned to use the speech-generating device and picture exchange card in 20 and 40 trials, respectively, but failed to learn the manual sign. Two children showed generalization across settings and people with picture exchange and the speech-generating device and one child showed generalization with all three options. One child showed generalization across settings with the picture exchange card. Maintenance was relatively better with the speech-generating device and picture exchange card and the children most often chose the speech-generating device during the preference assessments. The results suggest comparable acquisition, but better generalization and maintenance with AAC options that involve selecting a graphic symbol.

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  • Messy Fun With Balloons and Paint

    Hurrell, J. (2011)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The influence of local culture on the ideology of Samoan journalism

    Kenix, L.J. (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Much research implicitly suggests that journalism values arise from culturally removed organizational structures and shared occupational training. Further, few studies examine the perspective of journalism from both audiences and journalists. These omissions are important given the essentiality of mutually constructed and culturally embedded normative behaviours within journalism. This research examines audiences and journalists in Samoa, a country purposefully selected as a recently independent, post-colonial, country that relies upon a very traditional, shared national identity for it’s relatively nascent identificatory cohesion. This study aims to gain a better understanding of how local culture can set parameters and expectations for journalism; how journalists negotiate culture into their own professional ideology; and how audiences understand journalism within a cultural context.

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  • Five Diverse Videos at Lett

    Hurrell, J. (2012)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Christchurch Art Gallery's 10th Anniversary

    Feeney, W. (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    The CAG has put together a commemorative event like no other and this is no doubt due to a combination of curatorial intention and practical necessity. As a public arts project, the emphasis in Populate! is on murals, gallery exhibitions or large-scale reproductions of artworks rather than sculpture, a decision probably made by necessity.

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  • Steve Carr Assortment

    Hurrell, J. (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • In Praise of 'Invention, Forward Thinking and Liberty'

    Hurrell, J. (2013)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Risk-based structural fire design

    Abu, A. (2014)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    To date, structural fire design has been largely based on extreme fire scenarios. Now the University of Canterbury is investigating using probabilistic assessment to improve building performance during fires.

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  • Respiratory mechanics assessment for reverse-triggered breathing cycles using pressure reconstruction

    Major, V.; Corbett, S.; Redmond, D.; Beatson, A.; Glassenbury, D.; Chiew, Y.S.; Pretty, C.G.; Desaive, T.; Szlávecz, A.; Benyo, B.; Shaw, G.M.; Chase, J.G. (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Monitoring patient-specific respiratory mechanics can be used to guide mechanical ventilation (MV) therapy in critically ill patients. However, many patients can exhibit spontaneous breathing (SB) efforts during ventilator supported breaths, altering airway pressure waveforms and hindering model-based (or other) identification of the true, underlying respiratory mechanics necessary to guide MV. This study aims to accurately assess respiratory mechanics for breathing cycles masked by SB efforts. A cumulative pressure reconstruction method is used to ameliorate SB by identifying SB affected waveforms and reconstructing unaffected pressure waveforms for respiratory mechanics identification using a single-compartment model. Performance is compared to conventional identification without reconstruction, where identified values from reconstructed waveforms should be less variable. Results are validated with 9485 breaths affected by SB, including periods of muscle paralysis that eliminates SB, as a validation test set where reconstruction should have no effect. In this analysis, the patients are their own control, with versus without reconstruction, as assessed by breath-to-breath variation using the non-parametric coefficient of variation (CV) of respiratory mechanics. Pressure reconstruction successfully estimates more consistent respiratory mechanics. CV of estimated respiratory elastance is reduced up to 78% compared to conventional identification (p < 0.05). Pressure reconstruction is comparable (p > 0.05) to conventional identification during paralysis, and generally performs better as paralysis weakens, validating the algorithm’s purpose. Pressure reconstruction provides less-affected pressure waveforms, ameliorating the effect of SB, resulting in more accurate respiratory mechanics identification. Thus providing the opportunity to use respiratory mechanics to guide mechanical ventilation without additional muscle relaxants, simplifying clinical care and reducing risk.

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  • Felt Job Insecurity and Union Membership: The Case of Temporary Workers

    De Cuyper, N.; De Witte, H.; Sverke, M.; Hellgren, J.; Naswall, K. (2014)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    The present study investigates the relationship between felt job insecurity and union membership accounting for potential differences between temporary and permanent workers. Consistent with the idea that felt job insecurity leads workers to seek social protection from the unions, and with earlier studies, we hypothesize a positive relationship between felt job insecurity and union membership (Hypothesis 1). Furthermore, we argue that this relationship may be stronger among temporary compared with permanent workers (Hypothesis 2): insecure temporary workers are in a situation of 'double vulnerability', hence they have strong motives for unionization. Hypotheses are tested in a cross- -sectional sample of 560 Flemish (Dutch-speaking part of Belgium) workers. Our results were as follows: the relationship between felt job insecurity and union membership was not significant. The interaction term between contract type and felt job insecurity was significantly related to union membership: the relationship between felt job insecurity and union membership was positive among temporary workers, but not among permanent workers. This pattern of results may inspire unions to target future recruitment strategies on temporary workers. A route for future research could be to test our hypotheses also longitudinally.

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  • Horrible truth behind the lives of mentally challenged women: A follow up

    Ramavat, Suman (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    The following work is a follow up of my social commentary Rehabilitation of Mentally Ill Women in India published September 2016 in the International Journal for Intersectional Feminist Studies. The social commentary discussed the conditions of and chances of rehabilitation of mentally ill women who were being treated in government mental health hospitals. Sexual harassment and ill-treatment of mentally ill women were the main issues in my commentary. Interestingly, news surfaced the Indian media in the month of February 2017 which highlighted the ill treatment of mentally ill women by the institution’s staff. The news reported that eleven patients died due to negligence. Naked female patients, when they were waiting in queue for their turn for the shower, were recorded in the security cameras by a male employee. In this social documentary, I will discuss some of the reasons behind these incidences happened and some solutions to resolve them.

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  • The Marxist analysis of Manjula Padmanabhan’s “Lights Out”

    Bhargavi, G Vasishta (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    The societal rules have been largely shaped by the male-dominated legislators and forces where there is a limited right to exist for a woman. The woman though married or unmarried or a prostitute the way the society looks at her is not changing though we are globalized. Indian women, in some ways, have also made some strides. Millions of women have joined the workforce. Leaders like the Prathibha Singh Patel, Sushma Swaraj, Anandiben are role models who show that women can rise to great heights. But one of the greatest tragedies in our country is that women are on their own when it comes to their safety. According to many studies, it’s understood that most of the rape cases of rape are never reported because of the stigma surrounding gang rape. Considering this wide scenario, this article touches on Indian women’s vulnerability with a Marxist approach. I have applied the Marxist approach to analyse literary text, Lights Out by Manjula Padmanabhan in Indian English Theatre. In her work, the author proposes the urgent need to address women’s subordinated position as they are subjected to different forms of discrimination. In this article, I have focused on difference issues such as gender discrimination, injustice, and fear of the law, police and judicial apathy. I conclude by suggesting recommendations for the improvement of women’s situation in India.

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  • Voices of dissent in the poetry of Imtiaz Dharker

    Das, Soma (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Feminism as a movement acquired momentum in the last century. Feminist theorists from all corners of the world have put forward their views and ideologies to analyse and interpret the rights and duties, the laws and regulations which are exclusive to women. They have discussed, debated and deliberated on sundry affairs concerned with a woman, right from domestic drudgery to her involvement in official engagements, from cultural taboos inflicted on her as a girl in childhood to her perils even in old age, from puberty to post-menopause stage in her life. The heat of feminist discourse has hit contemporary Indian women poets writing in English, and therefore they have documented their perspectives through poetry leaving poignant impressions in the readers’ minds. This article is an evaluative approach to explore the impact of culture and religion, mostly Islam and partly Hinduism in different aspects of women’s lives. Her poems exhibit how the dictates of religious authority and tradition wipe away equality, compassion, and humanity and stifle a woman’s life to denigrate her personality to such an extent that she is rendered into self-depreciative non-entity in her own vision.

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  • Reproductive health status of scheduled and non-scheduled castes women of Ludhiana district in Punjab

    Sharma, Nishu; Sharma, Shalini (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    In India, access to healthcare facilities in rural areas remains significantly underdeveloped regarding health infrastructure. The present investigation endeavors to analyse the caste variation in the reproductive health status of Scheduled castes and Non-Scheduled castes. The study was conducted in rural areas of Ludhiana district of Punjab of India. It was conducted on 120 women in their reproductive age (15-45) that had given birth during four years preceding the study. It was conducted in villages which were randomly selected. Evidence suggests that demand-side barriers may be as important as supply factors in deterring patients from obtaining treatment. Relatively little attention is given, either by policy makers or researchers, to ways of minimizing their effect

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  • Humour: As a tool for gender construction and deconstruction

    Mushtaq, Sabah Al (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    This article adopts a social interactionist and constructionist approach to analyse humour as a tool for gender construction and deconstruction mainly about two genders, men and women. That is explained by highlighting the relationship between gender (as systems of meaning) and language, followed by over viewing three major standpoints about gender-based differences. These three standpoints are essentialist, social interactionist, and social constructionist approach. Further, I will discuss the importance of various variables like social, political and cultural backdrops in determining a “gender- based” mode of discourse. The article will conclude that socio-cultural context is very important to understand the role of feminist humour in gender construction and deconstruction. The point has been made that humour is used as a tool in the same gender and mix gender scenarios and social interactions to construct and deconstruct ‘masculine men’ (how a “Man” is supposed to behave) and ‘feminine women’ (how a “Woman” is supposed to behave). This process also mirrors the prevailing social constructions of gender.

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  • Synthetic shorelines in New Zealand? Quantification and characterisation of microplastic pollution on Canterbury's coastlines

    Clunies-Ross, P.J.; Smith, G.P.S.; Gordon, K.C.; Gaw, S. (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Microplastics are persistent environmental contaminants found in marine environments worldwide. Microplastic particles isolated from coastlines in the Canterbury region of New Zealand were quantified and characterised. Sediment samples were collected from ten locations representing exposed-beach, estuarine and harbour environments in both urban and non-urban settings. Particles were isolated from sediments using a NaCl density-separation procedure and quantified and characterised with a combination of optical/fluorescence imaging and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Microplastics were detected at 8 out of 10 locations, at concentrations ranging from 0 – 45.4 particles kg⁻¹ of dry sediment. The majority of microplastics were identified as polystyrene (55%), polyethylene (21%) and polypropylene (11%). Microplastic concentrations in exposed-beach environments were significantly greater than harbour and estuarine environments.

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  • Seismic vulnerability assessment of residential buildings using logistic regression and geographic information system (GIS) in Pleret Sub District (Yogyakarta, Indonesia)

    Saputra A; Rahardianto T; Revindo MD; Delikostidis I; Hadmoko DS; Sartohadi J; Gomez C (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Background: The Southeast of Yogyakarta City has had the heaviest damages to buildings in the 2006 of Yogyakarta Earthquake disaster. A moderate to strong earthquake of 6.3 Mw shook the 20 km southeast part of the Yogyakarta City early in the morning at 5:54 local time. On top of extensive damage in Yogyakarta and Central Java, more than 5700 people perished; 37,927 people were injured in the collapse of more than 240,396 residential buildings. Furthermore, the earthquake also affected the infrastructure and local economic activities. The total damages and losses because of the earthquake was 29.1 trillion rupiahs or equal to approximately 3.1 million US dollar. Two main factors that caused the severe damages were a dense population and the lack of seismic design of residential buildings. After reconstruction and rehabilitation, the area where the study was conducted grew into a densely populated area. This urbanistic change is feared to be potentially the lead to a great disaster if an earthquake occurs again. Thus, a comprehensive study about building vulnerability is absolutely needed in study area. Therefore, the main objective of this study has been the provision of a probabilistic model of seismic building vulnerability based on the damage data of the last big earthquake. By considering the relationship between building characteristics, site conditions, and the damage level based on probabilistic analysis, this study can offer a better understanding of earthquake damage estimation for residential building in Java. Results: The main findings of this study were as follows: The most vulnerable building type is the reinforced masonry structure with clay tile roof, it is located between 8.1-10 km of the epicentre and it is built on young Merapi volcanic deposits. On the contrary, the safest building type is the houses which has characteristics of reinforced masonry structure, asbestos or zinc roof type, and being located in Semilir Formation. The results showed that the building damage probability provided a high accuracy of prediction about 75.81%. Conclusions: The results explain the prediction of building vulnerability based on the building damaged of the Yogyakarta earthquake 2006. This study is suitable for preliminary study at the region scale. Thus, the site investigation still needs to be conducted for the future research to determine the safety and vulnerability of residential building.

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