72 results for University of Canterbury Library, Unclassified

  • Harassment, Privacy and Alison Mau

    Cheer, U. (2010)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Privacy has been in the news again. Alison Mau made complaints on the tele that she was being stalked by media. (this was denied). This story involves aspects of spying, or surveillance, and so it is timely to discuss some recommendations made by the Law Commission in its on-going investigation into our laws of privacy (Invasion of Privacy: Penalties and Remedies (Report 113, January 2010).

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  • Using trespass in newsgathering

    Cheer, U. (2010)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    It doesn’t happen often in New Zealand, but sometimes media use disreputable methods to obtain stories. One of these is trespass. Unauthorised entry on to another’s land is a trespass and is wrongful. The occupier of the land may bring a civil action for damages and, in some circumstances, a criminal prosecution may also result.

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  • Official Information and MP Spending Details

    Cheer, U. (2010)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Today I thought I’d talk about aspects of the law relating to official information, in the light of the ongoing story about release of details of MP’s spending.

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  • Compelling journalists to disclose sources

    Cheer, U. (2010)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Courts continue to struggle world-wide with the issue of whether journalists should have immunity or privileges preventing them from being compelled to disclose confidential sources. There have been few subpoenas issued to journalists over the years in New Zealand but none have resulted in imprisonment. It is apparent police have been reluctant to involve journalists in criminal proceedings and where they have been, courts have worked hard to find pragmatic solutions.

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  • Singh Case and the Campaign to Reform UK Defamation Law

    Cheer, U. (2010)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Recently, the Simon Singh defamation case became a cause celebre in the UK for a push for big changes in defamation law, which might have relevance to our law. However, some aspects of the campaign for change have been misinformed and misdirected. In a number of recent cases in the United Kingdom, professional bodies or companies have sued individuals who have criticised the support given by such bodies for the practices of their members or application of scientific methods. Simon Singh, a science writer, was sued by the British Chiropractic Association for questioning the evidence for its medical claims, and Peter Wilmshurst, a cardiologist, is being sued over his criticisms of an American company’s heart implant trial. A movement has grown up around these cases where concern has arisen about the chilling effects of the law on scientific criticism.

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  • Public interest, Torstar and the Lange Cases

    Cheer, U. (2010)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    I want to discuss the very recent decision of the Supreme Court of Canada in the Torstar case. The New Zealand leading case in this area, the Lange case, was significantly influenced by the Canadian Charter and by the contemporaneous development of human rights jurisprudence in a number of jurisdictions. Now it seems the New Zealand jurisprudence has played a significant part in this recent development of Canadian defamation law. This important decision has opened up the law of defamation for media in Canada. It also demonstrates nicely how common law systems of law are part of a robust process of fertilisation and cross-fertilisation of ideas, analysis and experience. The Supreme Court used a comparative analysis to reach its decision, by looking at developments elsewhere, including New Zealand. And in turn, this decision could influence where our law goes in the future.

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  • Thornton v Telegraph Case and Defamation

    Cheer, U. (2010)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Today it’s back to defamation law, that good old stand-by! A lot is happening in this area in the UK, where, as I think I’ve noted previously, there is an ongoing campaign to free up the laws, and where London is being labelled the ‘libel capital’ of the world, a rather exaggerated claim. In any event, listeners might remember the Singh case discussed previously, where best-selling author Simon Singh had published an article criticising chiropractic and the British Chiropractic Association in the Guardian in 2008. When the BCA sued him, all sorts of prominent people, like Stephen Fry, PEN authors, etc, began to call for change to libel laws, although on rather confused grounds, it has to be said. The main complaints appeared to be about the outrageous cost of defending defamation actions, as well as suggestions that it is too easy for non-English nationals who don’t live in the UK to sue there. Singh won his appeal and the case by the BCA has been dropped, but the campaign has continued, with the new coalition government being convinced to support a review of the laws with a view to reform.

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  • Submission on draft Tertiary Education Strategy 2010-2015

    Tobias, R.M. (2009)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    This submission reviews the draft Tertiary Education Strategy as it affects adult learners in general and in particular learners and practitioners in adult and community education (ACE). It is written from the perspective of someone who is committed to adult learning and community education in all their forms. The submission identifies a number of positive features of the document. However much of the submission focuses on its limitations. These include the lack of recognition of organisations such as the WEAs, the apparent lack of appreciation of the potential benefits and breadth of scope of ACE, the limited understanding of adult learners and their learning, including their achievements in ACE programmes and in formal tertiary studies, and the apparent failure to recognise that the contributions of tertiary education institutions should go beyond the constraints of credentialing and include ACE programmes which are credential-free. The submission argues that several of these limitations are likely to reduce the probability of achieving the objectives set out in the document and the paper concludes with a summary incuding some key recommendations.

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  • Could your school have a STEM emphasis?

    Conner, L. (2013)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    There are various descriptions of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics education around the world. In the USA it includes the fields of Chemistry, Computer and Information Technology Science, Engineering, Geosciences, Life Sciences, Mathematical Sciences, Physics, and STEM Education and Learning Research. Partly differences in what is included in STEM arise due to different views of technology and the levels of integration of the subjects as they are combined or not, in curricula design. In the international arena, technology tends to be synonymous with ICT. In New Zealand, we have a separate subject domain called technology that includes design for innovation through technological practice, knowledge, and understanding about the nature of technology. Effective communication, including the use of information technology, collaboration, problem-solving, creative and critical thinking skills are fundamental to STEM.

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  • Improved Management of Flood Risk : The New Framework

    Day, Terry (2005)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Poster detailing improved management of flood risk.

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  • Notes from the field: Research and the Indecency of Thinking

    Cooper, G. (2014)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • LARSP reference data for 2- and 3-year-old children

    Klee, T.; Gavin, W.J. (2010)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    The material in this document accompanies a manuscript submitted for publication.

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  • Transcription manual based on modified SALT transcription format

    Klee, T. (2010)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Reducing beam hardening effects and metal artefacts in spectral CT using Medipix3RX

    Rajendran, K; Walsh, M. F.; de Ruiter, N. J. A.; Chernoglazov, A. I.; Panta, R. K.; Butler, P. H.; Bell, S. T.; Woodfield, T. B. F.; Tredinnick, J.; Healy, J. L.; Bateman, C. J.; Aamir, R.; Doesburg, R. M. N.; Renaud, P. F.; Gieseg, S. P.; Smithies, D. J.; Mohr, J. L.; Mandalika, V. B. H.; Opie, A. M. T.; Cook, N. J.; Ronaldson, J. P.; Nik, S. J.; Atharifard, A.; Clyne, M.; Bones, P. J.; Bartneck, C.; Grasset, R.; Schleich, N.; Billinghurst, M.; Butler, A. P. H.; Anderson, N. G. (2014-02-05)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    DICOM Raw Data, with explanatory text files.

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  • How the law attempts to deal with hoaxes and pranks in the media that lead to harm

    Cheer, U. (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Today I can’t avoid talking about how the law attempts to deal with hoaxes and pranks in the media that lead to harm, following the shocking outcome of the prank by Mel Greig and Michael Christian, hosts of 2Day FM Radio station in Sydney.

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  • Practical, Legal and Ethical Issues Surrounding Disaster Reporting in Christchurch in the Last Two Years

    Cheer, U. (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    I want to talk a bit about a media project that I started work on over the summer, which is part of a larger project the Faculty of Law at Canterbury is carrying out, investigating the many legal issues that have arisen from the earthquakes.

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  • Bob Ham (1937-2012): A Pioneer in Waste Management

    Milke, M. (2013)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    This special issue of Waste Management is a series of papers in memory of Bob Ham. The papers are by former students and close colleagues, and also by researchers following along the paths blazed by Bob. As a preface to these papers, and a tribute to his memory, a number of contributors have provided their reflections.

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  • After the quake

    Milke, M. (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    This is a book review, though not classified that way by the journal.

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  • Dooley v Smith and Karam v Fairfax: Defamation and public interest cases

    Cheer, U. (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    I want to discuss two New Zealand defamation cases today, both of which tend to show an increasing relaxation or opening up of the law in ways which will benefit media.

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  • Scientific Writing for Young Astronomer, by Christiaan Sterken (EDP Sciences, Les Ulis, France), 2011

    Brogt, E. (2013)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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