3,868 results for University of Canterbury Library, Masters

  • Saltwater Modelling of Fire Gas Flow through a Horizontal Ceiling Opening

    Le Quesne, Marcus Andrew (2010)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    When fires occur in domestic or commercial buildings it is the smoke from the fire that leads to far more injury and death than the heat produced from the flames. Understanding the movement of smoke within the fire compartment and through openings in the enclosure is critical for designing buildings to prevent fire fatalities. Prediction of the movement of smoke is a complex phenomenon and is a continued focus of research throughout the world. Work has been conducted in the past on the exchange flow rates through vertical openings, but very little has been done on horizontal ceiling openings. Current smoke transport calculations are most often carried out using standard vent flow models that do not accurately take in to account the buoyancy component of the flow. The fire zone model BRANZFire was developed with a ceiling vent flow algorithm based on the work of Cooper who found there was very little data on which to base his predictions. This report aims to provide additional experimental data on exchange flow rates through horizontal ceiling openings through the use of saltwater modelling and compare this to the work previously undertaken by Cooper. Taking measurements of fire phenomena in hot and smoky environments can be difficult and expensive because the sooty environment and high temperatures involved can damage equipment and make taking accurate readings a challenge. Herein this problem is overcome through the use of a saltwater analogue system to model the conditions in a real fire scenario. The density difference created by a fire between the hot fire gases and the ambient air is replicated by using fresh and saltwater. The orientation of the experiment is inverted compared to the real life scenario as the saltwater which has the higher density is added to the fresh water. The saltwater is injected from a source on the ‘floor’ of the compartment into a tank of fresh water which generates a buoyant plume that ‘rises’ to the ceiling forming a distinct upper layer. Fluid in this layer exchanges with the ambient fluid through the ceiling opening. The saltwater is dyed and Light Attenuation (LA) is used to discern the density of the fluid and hence the amount of mixing that has occurred. This can then be used to determine the amount of exchange flow through the ceiling vent. An integral model for the descent of the interface between the hot smoky zone and the cool ambient zone has been developed and was found to perform well when compared with the saltwater experiments and another predictive model developed by Turner and Baines. The model was then developed further using mass conservation conventions to calculate the exchange flow through the ceiling opening. The exchange rate through the ceiling opening was calculated and was found to compare well with Cooper’s algorithm when an equivalent fire size of 323 kW was used but differed significantly when a fire twice this size was considered. It was found that Cooper’s method did not adequately take into account the difference in fire sizes as the exchange flow predicted was almost identical between fire sizes for a particular ceiling vent. The implications of this are that the exchange, and hence the mixing and the amount of smoke, may be under predicted using larger fires in BRANZFire and this could lead to non-conservative design.

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  • Project Management Internship in Post-Earthquake Christchurch: A review of experiences gained and lessons learned

    Helm, Benjamin (2013)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This report discusses the experiences gained and lessons learned during a project management internship in post-earthquake Christchurch as part of the construction industry and rebuild effort.

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  • The effect of the Canterbury earthquakes on alcohol consumption and motivations for drinking among psychologically resilient individuals

    Marie, Leila Michele Anastasia (2014)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Individual responses to natural disasters are highly variable. The psychological and behavioural response trajectories of those who manage to cope well with adverse life events are in need of further investigation. Increased alcohol use is often observed in communities exposed to mass traumas, particularly among those exposed to severe levels of trauma, with males drinking more than females. The current study examined patterns of alcohol use and motivations for drinking among a sample of psychologically resilient individuals with varying levels of exposure to the Canterbury earthquakes (N = 91) using structured and semi-structured interviews and self-report measures. As hypothesised, there was a significant increase in alcohol consumption since the earthquakes began, and males reported significantly higher levels of pre-earthquake and current alcohol consumption than females. Contrary to expectations, there was no association between traumatic exposure severity and alcohol consumption. While participants reported anxiety-based coping motives for drinking at levels comparable to those reported by other studies, depression-based coping motives were significantly lower, providing partial support for the hypothesis that participants would report coping motives for drinking at levels comparable to those found by other researchers. No gender differences in drinking motives were found. As expected, current alcohol consumption was positively correlated with anxiety and depression-based coping motives for drinking. Psychological resilience was not significantly associated with alcohol use, however resilience was negatively associated with depression-based coping motives for drinking. These findings have inter-generational and international implications for post-traumatic intervention.

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  • The dilemma of aural skills within year eleven music programmes in the New Zealand curriculum.

    Aburn, Robert John (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis investigates a perceived dilemma, music teachers and students have about the significance and value aural and listening skills have in relation to Year 11 Music under the National Certificate in Educational Achievement (NCEA). The study considers four teachers’ approaches to the teaching and learning of aural and listening skills, which are based on their own contextual experiences. These experiences have assisted the teachers in the construction of their own knowledge on which they base their own beliefs and pedagogical approaches. The teachers involved in this research collectively agreed that there were three important domains of musical activity, those of performing, composing and listening. Without the ability to ‘listen’, the other two musical activities become pointless. Aural training has been developed over time as a means of promoting critical listening and the ability to perceptively respond to aural stimuli. While there is dissent on the value music educationalists place on one aural skill over the other, it is generally agreed that a unified approach between aural recall and aural notation is the best approach. An area of contention that has emerged from this research is the dichotomy between the performance practices of students focusing on the performance of classical and contemporary music. The discrepancy between students’ understanding of traditional music notation is one of the biggest tensions teachers face. With the perceived emphasis on traditional western notation, some teachers in this research believe that NCEA music assessment focuses on the teaching of traditional classical music notation and theory. Other teachers involved, dispute this fact and strategically decide not to enter students for the external aural examination. For these teachers, their approach is focused on the development of general musicianship skills as a means of further enhancing student performance work. This thesis is practitioner research and developed from a teaching inquiry in an attempt to bring meaning and insight to an area of work that is believed to be critical to the holistic musical development of students.

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  • “Can the EU be a credible international security actor without the integration of the Member States’ militaries?”

    Comery, James (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Like a phoenix rising from the ashes, Europe emerged from World War Two as something akin to a new creation. Gone were the days of aggressive militarism and war, in its place would be civilian power and democracy; or so Europe hoped. The 20th and 21st Centuries have witnessed some of the most barbaric acts in human history; this barbarity has led Europe on a quest to form a truly integrated European defence force with which to bring peace and justice both within its own borders and also to the world. By utilising Jutta Weldes’ Constructivism framework, this thesis unravels and exposes the way in which the constructed identities of the European Union and its forbears have driven this quest in the post-war years; it also explores the interface between these identities and the EU’s relationship with NATO, the United States, and its own constituent Member States.

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  • Momentum in the foreign exchange market.

    Grewal, Armand (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper investigates the existence of price momentum in the Foreign Exchange market before and after the Global Financial Crisis, by analysing a sample of 18 currency pairs between 2002 and 2013. Using a portfolio formation approach, average spot and excess returns are calculated for investment horizons ranging from one day to one year. Secondly, this paper investigates a possible link between price momentum and the market positioning of speculators by using the US Commodity Futures Trading Commission’s Commitments of Traders report. The results suggest that price momentum in the Foreign Exchange market may be most prevalent over shorter time frames of up to one day. The fall in interest rates after the Global Financial Crisis has reduced the returns from momentum over longer time horizons, with these returns being higher for minor or exotic currency pairs. Lastly, changes to the market position of speculators often precedes the movements in the exchange rate over the following weeks, suggesting that speculators' actions may be an indicator of price continuations.

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  • The textual inscription of self : place in the retrospective childhood.

    Mizusawa, Ken (2000)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis is a study of five retrospective childhoods; namely, Frank McCourt's Angela's Ashes: A Memoir, Harry Crews' A Childhood: The Biography of a Place, Wole Soyinka's Ake: The Years of Childhood, Maxine Hong Kingston's The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood among Ghosts, and Kyoko Mori's The Dream of Water: A Memoir. I refer to them as retrospective childhoods in order to collapse the distinction between the memoir and autobiography, because, as Philipe Lejeune points out, as soon as the author allows the child to speak with his own voice, all autobiographical texts regardless of labels, are seen to

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  • Parents' need for and experiences of teen triple P following the Christchurch earthquakes.

    Burley, Joanna Susan (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Triple P parenting programmes have provided promising results for children and families in recent years. The aim of the current project was to explore the experiences of families leading up to participating in a Teen Triple P programme three years following the Christchurch earthquakes and their need for assistance in the management of their teenagers. Parents were interviewed prior to the commencement of the Teen Triple P programme and after its completion. Parents were also asked to complete a journal entry or engage in two brief telephone conversations with the researcher outlining their experiences with the Teen Triple P programme. These outlined the perceived fit of the programme to the needs of the family. Parents provided insight into their family’s experiences of the Christchurch 2010 and 2011 series of earthquakes and the perceived impact this had on their lives and the management of their teenagers. The results indicated that parents felt more positively about their parenting behaviours post-programme and were able to identify changes in their teen and/or family that they felt were as a response to participation in Teen Triple P. Parents provided rich descriptions of their earthquake experiences and the immediate and long-term impacts they endured both individually and as a family. Parents did not feel that the earthquakes fed into their decision to do a Teen Triple P Programme. The results helped improve our understanding of the effectiveness of Teen Triple P as a parenting programme as well increased our understanding of the challenges and needs of families in post-earthquake Christchurch.

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  • An arrangement of tablets for supporting collaborative learning

    Smart, Charles Macfie (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis details the design and implementation of a system that uses tablets to create a plat- form for co-located collaboration. Previous research has demonstrated the potential of touch tables for facilitating collaborative work, and this system seeks to create a similar working space and determine whether similar collaborative benefits can be achieved. An evaluation is carried out comparing the tablets system to a laptop and a touch table in terms of facilitat- ing collaboration. The tablets system is shown to have similar collaborative potential to the touch table. This offers a cheaper, more accessible alternative to touch tables for facilitating computer-supported collaborative learning.

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  • The adoption of cloud computing for small and medium accounting firms.

    Ma, Xinding (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the current state of cloud computing within the accounting industry, by studying how cloud computing technology had been used by accounting firms, and the factors that led to this rapid growth of cloud computing over the last few years. There is virtually no prior empirical research on cloud computing in the context of accounting. Design and Methodology: the case study methodology is used, which consisted of six accounting firms. Semi-structured interviews are carried out with key personnel in the firms, focusing on how cloud-based software is used, and the reasons why they chose cloud-based software. Findings: findings suggest that cloud computing should be differentiated into two categories: externally-focused and internally-focused. Cloud-based accounting software is widely used by the firms, and it improved the ability for accounting firms to collaborate with their clients, hence a competitively viable tool. Internally-focused cloud-based software, however, was not popular among the accounting firms. Originality/value: this study highlights the importance of defining the scope of cloud computing (and information systems in general), and the introduction of strategic value into adoption studies. Moreover, this study provides some empirical evidence into the under-researched area of cloud accounting.

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  • Theatre as a way of discovering common ground between separate ethnic and cultural groups.

    Dupres, Diane Elizabeth (2014)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Theatre theorists and practitioners around the world have taken on the challenge of developing strategies for bringing diverse peoples together through the use of a range of activities and techniques, many culminating in public performances designed to celebrate a new or restructured sense of community. Starting from the foundation provided by Victor Turner, whose ideas of social drama and communitas are essential to this research, the author looks at some of the theorists and practitioners – in particular, Dorothy Heathcote and Augusto Boal– who have worked in this area, in order to explore their ideas and methods for using theatre for social change. The work of these theorists and practitioners helped the author to develop a theatrical model that could be employed for her own project. This thesis culminates in an analysis of the work done to produce a community-based performance and to propose, as a result, a model for approaching this sort of work in the future.

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  • Charities in the contract culture : the unintended consequences of partnership and intervention in the free market.

    Stott, Emily (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis looks at New Zealand charities and their role within the mixed economy of welfare since the introduction of the contract culture in the late 1980s. Interviews with 11 charity workers across 8 different charities were conducted. It is a mixed methods research design which combines grounded theory analytical methods with a comparative analytical strategy of engaging with Milton Friedman’s conception of liberalism. This thesis argues that how charities cope, and the tensions they experience in the contract culture are an unintended consequence of the failure of the implementation of the ideal neoliberal free market. It is important to understand the significance of the failure to implement a free market as it explains why charities still struggle with their autonomy. Finally, recommendations are made for the removal of government paternalism and intervention in the contracting process to provide a more competitive market. This would enable the implementation of a successfully cost-effective and innovative contract culture.

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  • Design of Loadbearing Light Steel Frame Walls for Fire Resistance

    Gerlich, J T (Hans) (1995)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Light steel frame (LSF) building systems are becoming more prevalent in commercial, industrial and residential construction in New Zealand. Tested fire resistance ratings are generally available for non-loadbearing LSF drywall systems lined with gypsum plasterboard. No test information exists for loadbearing systems. Current solutions are based on limiting steel temperature. This study investigates the parameters which affect the performance of loadbearing LSF drywall systems exposed to fire. Structural design codes for cold-formed steel members are compared. Methods are presented for calculating the reduction of steel strength and stiffness at elevated temperatures, and for predicting the deformations resulting from temperature gradients and P-∆ effects. Heat transfer modelling by computer is used to predict steel framing temperatures for systems exposed to the standard ISO834 time-temperature curve and real fires. Three full-scale furnace tests were carried out to evaluate analytical predictions. A model is proposed for predicting the performance of loadbearing LSF systems exposed to fire. Results are within 80-90% of test results. The current practice of designing to a limiting steel temperature results in unduly conservative predictions, particularly for systems with low applied axial loads. It was also found that fire tests may give non-conservative results for systems with low stud loads due to frictional restraints.

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  • Fire Response of HVAC Systems in Multistorey Buildings: An Examination of the NZBC Acceptable Solutions

    Dixon, M. J. (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    It is recognised that smoke is the major killer in most fires. In buildings with mechanical heating, ventilation or air conditioning (HVAC) systems the traditional reaction to a fire was to shut the HVAC system down, although in recent years some buildings have included a smoke management mode as part of their HVAC system, and/or have dedicated smoke management equipment (eg stair pressurisation). The current Building Code Approved Documents give little guidance on the appropriate actions for HVAC systems to take in the event of a fire, and some requirements of the Acceptable Solutions are unclear. The objective stated in the Approved Documents is to avoid allowing smoke to spread to other firecells via the air conditioning system. HVAC systems can be utilised to actively manage smoke movement and can achieve this in a variety of ways. This report attempts to provide some improvements to the Approved Documents and to give general guidelines to assist non-mechanical fire engineers and non-fire mechanical engineers in designing or specifying appropriate responses to a fire in a typical multistorey building. The report does not examine smoke control in atria or other large spaces. The various generic classes of ventilation or air conditioning systems are described and the appropriate behaviour of each under fire conditions is discussed. Results of some computer modelling of air (and cold smoke) flows around typical buildings are presented. The modelling indicates that the current levels at which active smoke control is invoked in the Acceptable Solutions are appropriate. It also suggests that the frequent practice of shutting off the ventilation system on a fire alarm may not be the best solution to managing smoke flows within the building. Particular sections of the Acceptable Solutions relating to mechanical ventilation which are unclear or confusing are also discussed with suggested amendments proposed.

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  • Report on fire in atrium buildings problems and control : including a case study on the Pan Pacific Hotel Auckland.

    Antonio, L. (1992)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Atrium buildings are now becoming a common feature in New Zealand with this new structural form being applied to hotels, office blocks and hospitals. Being a new form of structure, there has been little study or experience of how these buildings perform in the event of fire. In an effort to investigate just how safe atrium buildings are, this report will outline problems specifically associated with atria. The fire protection and safety systems employed which can most effectively be used to protect property and save lives. By the use of case studies, typical fire control measures installed in atrium buildings are described, with a report on how these were installed in the Pan Pacific Hotel, Auckland, together with a brief description of recent incidents of atrium building fires. It should be made clear, how recent studies have led to the establishment and subsequent development of design guidelines and codes for fire safety in atrium buildings.

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  • Wearable Tools for Affective Remote Collaboration

    GUPTA, KUNAL (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Affective computing is the study and development of systems that can recognize human emotions and feelings. Emotions are always an interesting topic of research and these days researchers are trying to develop systems which can recognize, interpret and process emotions based on human physiological and neural changes for the development of well-being. As the market for wearable devices is expanding, it provides more opportunity of research in emotion sharing with remote person. This Master’s thesis investigates the possibility of using wearable devices for affective remote collaboration. Previous research about affective computing, affective communication and remote collaboration using wearable devices is reviewed before starting the design process. Three wearable devices were developed, evaluated and discussed, two for emotion sharing between remote people, and the third for preliminary research to explore if eye gaze information can increase co-presence in remote collaboration. Conclusions and Future work are discussed based on the results from the research evaluation.

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  • The Civil Law Influence on the Evolution of Testamentary Succession

    Breach, Lindsay Dean (2013)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    n/a

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  • An Independent Review of Project Management Processes for CERA’s Port Hills Land Clearance Programme

    Patterson, Todd Keith (2014)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This report to RCP Ltd and University of Canterbury summarises the findings of a 5 month secondment to the CERA Port Hills Land Clearance Team. Improvement strategies were initiated and observed. The Port Hills Land Clearance Programme is the undertaking of the demolition of all built structures from the Crown’s compulsory acquired 714 residential red zoned properties. These properties are zoned red due to an elevated life risk as a result of geotechnical land uncertainty following the 2011 Canterbury Earthquakes.

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  • Fire Design of Single Storey Industrial Buildings

    Cosgrove, B W (1996)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This report aims to establish a design methodology for meeting basic fire safety objectives within single storey industrial buildings using a 'common-sense' approach. A wide range of fire safety issues are addressed, ranging from environmental protection to life safety and structural performance. The emphasis is on meeting the performance requirements of the New Zealand Building Code for fire safety and hazard management. Given that industrial buildings are likely to fall into a high fire hazard category, alternative fire engineering design methods are deemed necessary for Building Code compliance. Attention is also given to issues that are not part of Building Code requirements or acceptable solutions. A fire safety strategy is recommended for an industrial site, with the focus on establishing a level of 'acceptable loss'. A risk assessment provides the means to meet loss control objectives. This should form the basis for a new buildings' fire protection design, plus the on-going fire safety management programme. Automatic alarms are considered essential for life safety and property protection, with sprinklers being the only method of controlling a fire within a typical industrial complex. The Fire Service cannot be expected to attack and suppress a fire from receiving an alarm call without sprinkler support. The Fire Service can, however, be expected to control the spread of fire to neighbouring property given certain conditional events work in their favour. The act of prewetting neighbouring combustible surfaces and thereby increasing the critical radiation intensity for pilot ignition, is considered very effective in preventing fire spread. Increasing fire rating requirements for boundary walls based on withstanding equivalent fire severities for the 'design' fire, is considered overly conservative. A maximum rating of 4 hours is recommended for any boundary wall. This recommendation is based on maximum values used in overseas Codes and assumes that boundary walls are connected to primary support structures and adjoining wall panels, so that if they fail they collapse inwards as one complete unit. The report provides a comprehensive list of conclusions that expand on the above overview, plus recommends areas for future research.

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  • Full-Scale Testing of Fire Suppression Agents on Shielded Fires

    Gravestock, Neil (1998)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This report examines the relative effectiveness of water mist, water mist with class A foam concentrate added, and class A compressed air foam in the extinguishment of a shielded, post-flashover, compartment fire. This is to assist the New Zealand Fire Service in determining future firefighting tactics and equipment. Extinguishing agent application used hand lines operated by Fire Service personnel. Application of each of the three agents was for a fixed total period of ten seconds, with a constant flow rate of 2.8 litres/second. The class A solution was a wet foam with an expansion ratio of 1:2, and the compressed air foam was drier with an expansion ratio of 1:5. Measurement of the water content in the fire exhaust gases indicated peak moisture contents between 10% and 20%. No rise in water content was observed during suppression. Compartment temperatures peaked at 750°C to 820°C. Cooling to 200°C occurred within around 80 seconds of extinguishment. Cooling rates were similar for all three methods. The fires achieved peak heat release rates of up to 4500 kW. All three methods gave good initial extinguishment for fires of this size. Subsequent re-ignition occurred in most cases. No significant difference was found in the suppression performance of the three agents expressed in terms of heat release rate reduction, which was measured using oxygen calorimetry.

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