2,221 results for University of Otago, Masters

  • The Whalemen of Foveaux Strait, 1829-1850

    Irwin, Cecil H (1948)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: iii, 187 p. [9] leaves of plates : ill., diagrs., maps. Notes: Original lacks p.160. Thesis (M. A.)--University of Otago, 1948. Microfilm. 1 reel microfilm (negative).

    View record details
  • He kupu tuku iho mo tenei reanga : Te ahua o te tuku korero

    Higgins, Rawinia Ruth (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    170 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Māori, Pacific and Indigenous Studies. "March 1999."

    View record details
  • One Pot Double Network Hydrogels: Progress Towards Synthesis of Applicable Crosslinking Agents

    Sutherland, Peter Hugh (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Our work initially looked at the possibility of being able to synthesis a double network hydrogel in just one free radical polymerisation. We intended to carefully select three compounds based on their copolymerisation reactivity under free radical conditions. This reactivity would generate a tightly cross-linked network first, followed by a loosely cross-linked network in one process. The hypothesis was tested by a Monte-Carlo simulation which showed that this two network state was achievable with known reactivity ratios. This work primarily focuses on the synthesis of novel cross-linkers based on N-vinyl pyrrolidone (1). This monomer has the necessary copolymerisation ratios with methyl methacrylate for this project, so simple difunctional analogues of 1 were designed. The synthesis and purification of these analogues proved not to be straightforward, and in the end only very small amounts of a suitable material were obtained. While the idea has merit, new ways of synthesising the key cross-linker still need to be found.

    View record details
  • The impact of patents on New Zealand's biotechnology and genetics services sectors

    Green, Aphra (2008)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 155 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 151-155. University of Otago department: Law

    View record details
  • W. E. Gudgeon : his contribution to the annexation of the Cook Islands.

    Currie, Ernest Rowland (1963)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 90 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaf iv-v.

    View record details
  • Customary international law in National Courts: a comparative analysis

    Bottermann, Uwe (2000)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    88 leaves :maps (1 in pocket) plates ; 29 cm. Bibliography: p. 83-88. University of Otago department: Law. "October 2000"

    View record details
  • Communicating New Zealand's Organic Certification

    Barbalich, Gerard (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    As the New Zealand organics industry continues to grow, a unified message would aid consumer understanding and branding. Currently, certification is producer-focused, while consumers express confusion surrounding organic products and the associated benefits. This thesis argues that current organic certification schemes should be altered through: (i) aligning marketing strategies under the scientifically validated environmental benefits of organic products, and (ii) implementing strategies that are line with the dialogue model of science communication. While the domestic and international organic markets for organic products are growing, international studies show consumer confusion – especially relating to organic labelling (Henryks & Pearson, 2011). The communication of current certification schemes is ill suited to communicate the benefit of organic products and manage the branding of organic products. Implementing the proposed changes will aid an industry that was worth an estimated $215-$225m in exports during 2012, and $126-$133m domestically (Cooper et al., 2013). Strengthening the communication of organic certification in New Zealand will (i) improve the brand performance of organic certifiers and producers, and (ii) improve national branding (Dinnie, 2008). In addition to the academic component, an informally styled story explores the production chain of an organically produced sheep (this story comprises the creative component and draws upon poetic licence). It explores several issues and perceptions of organic products, including: sustainability, environmental protection, and human health.

    View record details
  • SMA-raloxifene for the management of castrate-resistant prostate cancer

    Pritchard, Tara Cheree (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has a poor prognosis, and these tumours are refractory to conventional androgen deprivation therapy. In addition to androgen, oestrogen alone or combined with androgen induces abnormal growth and neoplastic transformation of the prostate, therefore, providing a secondary target. The selective oestrogen receptor modulator raloxifene elicits disease stabilisation in a small number of CRPC patients, and the encapsulation of raloxifene into a styrene copoly(maleic acid) micelle (SMA-raloxifene) shows the potential to improve its efficacy. Further investigation in the current study determined the greater in vitro cytotoxicity of SMA-raloxifene (5 μM) is a result of the higher intracellular internalisation compared to the free drug. This resulted in a 75% higher intracellular raloxifene concentration after 48 h in PC-3 cells. Additionally, raloxifene (10 μM) elicited a reduction in phosphorylation of proteins involved in cell proliferation, survival, and migration including Met, Akt, FAK, and Src to 29, 14, 17, and 45% of control expression, respectively, as evaluated by western blot. SMA-raloxifene elicited an even greater reduction in Met and Akt phosphorylation, reducing expression to 1 and 5% of control, respectively. The efficacy of SMA-raloxifene was then examined in a CRPC xenograft model with the hypothesis that the micelle would accumulate and be retained within the tumour for longer as a result of the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Male SCID mice (7-8 weeks) were subcutaneously implanted with PC-3 cells (1 x 106) bilaterally into the lower flank, and randomly allocated into treatment groups (n=8). Mice were treated weekly for 4 weeks via intravenous tail vein injection with the vehicle control, 1 or 5 mg/kg of free raloxifene, or 1 mg/kg of SMA-raloxifene. At the end of the treatment period, mice treated with 1 mg/kg of free raloxifene exhibited a reduction in tumour progression by 20%, and an equivalent dose of SMA-raloxifene reduced progression by 39%. 1 mg/kg of SMA-raloxifene reduced tumour progression equivalently to a dose of free raloxifene 5-fold higher (i.e. 5 mg/kg). Despite this reduction in tumour progression, treatment did not induce disease stabilisation. A biodistribution study was then conducted in a CRPC xenograft model as described above. It was concluded that SMA-raloxifene (5 mg/kg, i.v.) increased the retention of raloxifene within the tumour compared to the free drug, resulting in 69% higher intratumoural raloxifene concentration 24 h post-injection. This is likely to be a result of the higher internalisation of drug as demonstrated in vitro, as well as an increased stability and reduced metabolism of the drug within micelles. Overall, SMA-raloxifene significantly improved the drug’s efficacy towards CRPC cells in vitro and in vivo; however, optimisation of SMA-raloxifene is required to further potentiate treatment efficacy for the management of CRPC.

    View record details
  • Generation X’ers’ values and how they perceive the New Zealand labour market

    Lavender, Erin (2000-07)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    My research was based around skilled Generation X employees and what they value in long-term employment relationships. Initially my research was looking at employee retention in organisations, I began an initial literature review on this topic but was swamped with information and found that I would need to narrow my research. One area that was not well understood in the literature was employee retention methods for different age groups. This prompted me to look at Generation X and what they value in employment relationships, as away to understand how to better suit their needs and hopefully illustrate the ways in which they can be retained. I also believed that understanding the New Zealand labour market and illustrating how things like the brain drain, the new psychological contact, and the idea of mobile careers maybe having an affect on organisations and individuals was important and may in some way could be tied to Generation X'ers values in employment relationships. I began my research with a literature review on what Generation X employees are said to value in employment relationships, the main themes that were illustrated by the literature were such things as feedback, training and development, balanced lifestlyes, and fun. I also reviewed literature on issues I thought were relevant to the New Zealand labour Market including the brain drain, the new psychological contract and the notion of mobile careers Once my literature review was complete I established a number of questions I wished to find answers to including: 1. Do Generation X'ers and their managers perceive that the brain drain, the new psychological contract, and the idea of mobile careers are pertinent issues to managing/retaining Generation X? 2. Do Generation X'ers and their managers perceive that the brain drain, the new psychological contract, and the idea of mobile careers exists in the context of the New Zealand labour market? 3. What effect do they perceive these things have on the New Zealand labour market? 4. Do these things affect them personally? 5. What do graduate Generation X workers value in long-term employment relationships? 6. Do these Generation X employees perceive the organisation they work for as being able to understand their values?

    View record details
  • Gold Rush and Gold Mining: A Technological Analysis Of Gabriel's Gully and the Blue Spur, 1861-1891

    MacArthur, Nicol Allan (2014)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Philip Ross May stated in 1980 that well-informed studies of the technology of gold rushes and gold mining were long overdue but very little has been added to the historiography since then. As a result, various misconceptions and misunderstandings have entered into the New Zealand and wider gold rush historiography. A conflation of gold rushing with gold mining is sometimes evident and another misconception entrenches corporate structure with the level of capitalisation and mixes the mining of alluvial and quartz reef gold. On May’s lines, this thesis argues that technology lies at the heart of all gold rushes and their gold mining, and seeks simply to demonstrate that the technology of gold rushes was different from the technology of gold mining. The thesis first completes a historical survey of gold rushes from sixteenth century Spanish America until Victoria in the 1850s. It then then closely evaluates the technology of the Gabriel's Gully gold rush and its extension to mining the Blue Spur deposit, both as local history and also to deepen the findings of the global review. All gold rushes were found to use a common suite of hand tools and simple manual methods of low productivity. This manual simplicity was diagnostic as was a slow- down in gold output and modifications in methods as the rich easy gold became exhausted. To continue required either hydraulic or mechanical methods, or large coordinated labour forces, along with capital expenditure. This signified mining, which typically comprised ground sluicing, hydraulicking, deep leading, or river mining. Unlike other rushes, the Gabriel's Gully rush used hydraulic energy in long toms and box sluices, as well as manual cradling, to wash the paydirt. Whether due to this or not, a remarkable new finding is that in its first twenty-one months, the Tuapeka district produced more gold than the first twenty-one months of the Californian rush. Regarding mining, Blue Spur proved to be an extremely large orebody, much of it heavily cemented and capable of high gold contents. Over its long fifty-year life, as different zones were reached, alluvial, quarrying, and underground mining and stamp milling technologies were applied, and culminated in hydraulicking and the innovative hydraulic elevating developed in Gabriel's Gully. However, regardless of the mining technology in use, there was no structural change in the Blue Spur mining parties for twenty years, although each new technology required higher capitalisation. This supports Hearn’s work on the Tinkers goldfield. This technological study has perhaps filled a gap in the local historiography, and historians of the Otago gold rushes and gold mining may be encouraged to pursue other lines of enquiry with the role of technology included in their perspective. This leads to a wider point that ongoing mining histories in New Zealand could look to the characteristics of local deposits and their required technology before generalising across different types of gold deposit nationally. The work shows also that Otago had a significant role in the global innovations in alluvial mining technology of the nineteenth century.

    View record details
  • Open market share repurchases in New Zealand

    Henderson, George (2000)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    When a firm repurchases its own common stock, it buys back a proportion of its own equity from existing shareholders. For open market transactions the stock is acquired at market value and in an efficient market the transfer should not change shareholders' wealth. However, empirically, such corporate activity in American markets is generally associated with stock price increases and, consequently, increases in remaining shareholder wealth. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of open market share repurchases on the share price of New Zealand firms. If any abnormal returns are identified then the hypotheses suggested by American studies will be investigated to see which, if any, hold for the New Zealand case.

    View record details
  • A comparison of IPOs from small and medium sized enterprises: China vs Australia

    Ze, Tian (2000)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The general market behaviour of unseasoned new issues of Chinese A-shares and Australian common stock at the time of first day trading on respective stock exchanges is investigated, presenting a time-series analysis of the monthly volume and average initial returns on initial public offerings over a certain period of time. Also, the correlation of volume and underpricing among different groups of companies according to their size is studied. The underpricing of new stock issue defined as initial returns is widespread. The scale is extreme, especially on both the Shanghai Securities Exchange (SHSE) and Shenzhen Stock Exchange (SZSE) of China. The percentage of IPOs for small and medium sized enterprises is increasing in China and decreasing in Australia on average during the period presented in this paper. The results show that there is no significant difference in size between the companies listed on SHSE and SZSE in terms of total asset or revenue.

    View record details
  • A curriculum for e-Business education

    Tham, Wai Loong (2000-12)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    This is a digital copy of the thesis that is stored on an accompanying CDRom. It is not a full and exact duplicate of the print version of the thesis

    View record details
  • The history of the early gold discoveries in the Province of Otago, 1851-1863.

    Jefcoate, Harold Oliver (1922)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Bibliography missing.

    View record details
  • Cataclastic Processes within the Alpine Fault Zone

    Scott, Hannah Rosaline (2012)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Interloan of Geology theses must first be approved by the Geology Department.

    View record details
  • Accord and satisfaction by way of full settlement cheque

    Currie, Simon Colin (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 225 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "November 4, 2007". University of Otago department: Law.

    View record details
  • The Southland province of New Zealand in the days of Dr. J.A.R. Menzies (Superintendent, 1861-1864).

    Dreaver, A. R. (1929)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    59 leaves, [25] leaves of plates :ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 25 cm.

    View record details
  • Modelling type-denoting concepts and words in a simulation of vocabulary development.

    Webb, Andrew (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Luc Steels proposes a mechanism by which a community of agents is able to negotiate a common vocabulary for referring to objects in their environment, using two simple games. In a ‘discrimination game’, an agent equipped with a set of simple sensory channels attempts to distinguish a target from a set of context objects. If it cannot do so, it subdivides one of its channels to make discrimination more likely in future. In a ‘language game’, a speaker agent identifies an object in the world, and consults a lexicon of mappings from object concepts to words to generate a word for this object, that is then passed to a hearer agent. The hearer uses its own lexicon to attempt to identify the object in question. If successful, the word-concept mapping is reinforced for both speaker and hearer; if not, the speaker indicates the intended object explicitly. Using these games, a group of agents can successfully develop a shared vocabulary. However, it is possible that the success of Steels’ system is an artifact of the highly artificial classification and word-learning mechanisms which agents use. Discrimination games make no reference to current biological theories of perception and discrimination, and language games make no reference to psychological theories of vocabulary acquisition. This thesis describes a Steels-like system in which agents have more psychologically realistic categorisation and word-learning methods. The main conclusion of this work is that Steels’ system can be successfully reimplemented using more psycho- logically realistic object classification and word-learning methods.

    View record details
  • An integrated literature review of the role of the nurse practitioner in the emergency department

    Eden, Sheryl M (2011)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    A dissertation in partial fulfilment of Master [of] Health Sciences (Clinical) through [the] University of Otago, [Dunedin, New Zealand]. Description: v, 115 leaves : forms ; 30 cm. Notes: "January 2011." Thesis (MHealSc)--University of Otago, 2011. Includes bibliographical references.

    View record details
  • Velcro babies: A Qualitative Study Exploring Maternal Motivations in the Night-time Care of Infants

    Clarke, Judith (2016)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    New Zealand has one of the highest rates of sudden unexpected death in infancy (SUDI) in the OECD, with most deaths occurring during sleep and at night. Whilst recommendations for safe infant sleep are promoted to parents, there is little understanding of how parents make decisions as they interpret these population level recommendations at the individual level. The objective of this qualitative study was to explore how mothers made decisions in the night-time care of infants, in one suburb of Christchurch, New Zealand. An inductive qualitative design was used to explore the topic. Thirteen semi-structured interviews were held with mothers of infants aged less than 6 months old, living in a more socio-economically deprived suburb. Thematic analysis was used to search for emerging themes and these were analysed in the context of existing literature and concepts from appropriate critical social theories. The study found that night-time infant care decision-making was complex. Mothers were dealing with competing tensions between keeping their babies safe from death, and meeting their immediate needs for food, comfort and sleep. Added to this were pressures from the dominant ‘intensive mothering’ ideology which holds mothers accountable for their infants’ psychological and emotional wellbeing. In attempting to live up to the myth of intensive mothering, women individualized and privatized risk behaviours in ways that aligned with neoliberal rationalities. Part of being a ‘good mother’ was being seen to follow ‘expert’ advice around safe infant sleep practices. When the baby was settled and healthy, mothers were more likely to trust ‘expert’ advice and follow recommendations. However, on occasion and in unplanned ways, the needs of the baby and/or the mother, led mothers to act in ways that differed from ‘expert’ advice. Mothers mitigated risks in their own ways, and used intuition to protect their infants from perceived danger. Nonetheless, anxiety levels were high for some mothers, due, in part, to the knowledge that a baby could die despite their efforts. Anxiety levels are not helped by recommendations that leave no room for negotiating the complexity of night-time infant care, nor by prosecuting mothers whose infants die in unsafe sleep environments. Greater recognition needs to be given to the complex realities within which decisions are made. The use of empathy in individualizing population level public health recommendations may relieve maternal guilt and anxiety, and empower mothers.

    View record details