215 results for University of Waikato, Book item

  • Huw Price

    Legg, Catherine (2010)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    A review of the life and work of Australian philosopher, Huw Price.

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  • Literacy and Thinking Tools for Science Teachers

    Whitehead, David (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Literacy and thinking tools, such as Venn diagrams, are construction tools for the mind. Just as carpenters use tools to construct a piece of furniture, literate thinkers learning science can use tools to construct new scientific understandings. Like tools used by a carpenter, some literacy and thinking tools are purpose-built for science education; Josephine used a Venn diagram tool because she wanted to compare her pet bird to a bald eagle. Just as a screwdriver is built to slot into the head of a screw and rotate it, you can use literacy and thinking tools for subject- and text-specific purposes. In this chapter, we examine some characteristics of literacy and thinking tools (Whitehead, 2001, 2004). A list of these tools, together with the chapters associ-ated with their use, is provided in Table 2:1.

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  • Street health: Practitioner service provision for Maori homeless people in Auckland

    Nikora, Linda Waimarie; Hodgetts, Darrin; Groot, Shiloh Ann Maree; Stolte, Ottilie Emma Elisabeth; Chamberlain, Kerry (2012-09)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Drawing insights from interviews with Maori homeless people, health professionals, and relevant local and international literatures, this chapter focuses on the provision of medical care to homeless people. In particular, we propose that health services orientate to accommodate the worldviews and circumstances of Maori homeless people. Below we consider colonialism and societal developments that have led to homelessness among Maori today. We then present a case study of ‘Grant’, which was compiled from common aspects of various Maori homeless people who access health services at the Auckland City Mission (ACM); an organisation with a long history of catering to the needs and hopes of dispossessed groups, providing food, clothing, advocacy, social and health services. The relational orientation of healthcare at the ACM is discussed, and leads to an exploration of ‘judgement-free service space’ for meeting client needs (cf., Trussell & Mair, 2010). Lastly, we focus on how health professionals can respond to the multiple healthcare needs of Maori homeless people, in partnership with social services.

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  • Three feminist critiques of varying feminist capitulations to crisis-hegemony

    Grear, Anna (2011)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The seemingly intractable pull between the Scylla of 'resistance' and the Charybdis of 'compliance' and the agonistic dilemmas presented by the complexity and difficulty of positioning feminism in relation to them both is well-traced in these chapters by Dianne Otto, Julie Mertus and Maria Grahn-Farley. While a range of themes emerges from reflection on these nuanced and thoughtful chapters, at the heart of each, in different ways, the colonisation of certain emancipatory feminist projects and agendas by the crisis-driven post 9/11 international legal discourse emerges as a central concern, along with a set of related sub-themes: The traction (and inequality) of hegemonic and counter-hegemonic thought-worlds and actions; the pernicious effects of decontextualisation (either the transcendence or the 'emptying out' of context (including,worryingly, lived experience of violation)); the fragile potency of ground level viewpoint, action and perspective; the false totality of the securityhegemon; its liquid propagandism, and related concerns circling around co-opted feminist responses.

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  • Engineering: good for technology education?

    Williams, P. John (2011)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Recent curriculum changes in the educational system of Australia have resulted in study options being available in Engineering for senior secondary students to use for university entrance. In other educational systems, Engineering is playing an increasingly important role, either as a stand-alone subject or as part of an integrated approach to Science, Mathematics and Technology. These developments raise questions about the relationship between Engineering and Technology education, some of which are explored in this paper.

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  • Introduction

    Barnard, Roger; Burns, Anne (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The book aims to fill the gap between conventional research methodology books and published reports of research such as are found in academic journals. While volumes on methodology may explain how and why a particular approach to data collection should be used, they tend not to give specific and detailed examples of the 'messiness' of research - what may go wrong and how to overcome the obstacles that invariably get in the way of a smooth research journey.

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  • Responses of salmonids to habitat changes

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Hall, James D.; Bisson, P. A.; Sedell, J. R. (1991)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Streams in western North America provide spawning and rearing habitats for several species of salmon and trout that are of substantial economic importance in the region. Timber that grows on lands through which these streams flow is also economically important, and its harvest can substantially change habitat conditions and aquatic production in salmonid streams. Undisturbed forests, the streams that flow through them, and the salmonid communities in these streams have intrinsic scientific, genetic, and cultural values in addition to their economic importance. The complex relations between salmonids and their physical environment, and the changes in these relations brought about by timber harvest, have been investigated extensively (see the bibliography by Macdonald et al. 1988). However, in spite of considerable evidence of profound changes in channel morphology and in light, temperature, and flow regimes associated with timber harvests, much uncertainty exists about the responses of salmonids to these changes.

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  • To act or not to act? That is the question!

    Bruce Ferguson, Pip (2013)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The year was 2003. I was a new Research Manager working in a Māori tertiary institution that had a history of inequitable treatment by government, through not receiving establishment funding that had gone unproblematically to non-Māori institutions. Repeating a common pattern in New Zealand, our government had decided to implement a research funding scheme, to be measured at the level of the individual academic. My institution’s decision to participate in the PBRF was not without its difficulties, and it is here that the ethics of participation become problematic. This chapter is about our ability to articulate our values, to show how we work these out in our practice, and how we are accountable to ourselves and others for that practice. Would I, with the benefit of hindsight, have encouraged my institution to enter the PBRF again?

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  • ‘Framing the project’ of international human rights law: Reflections on the dysfunctional ‘family’ of the Universal Declaration

    Grear, Anna (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Full text embargoed until November 2013.

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  • Drug delivery by electroporation: Review

    Talele, Sadhana (2013)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Drug delivery is the method or process of administering a pharmaceutical compound to achieve a therapeutic effect in humans or animals. Most common routes of administration include the preferred non-invasive peroral (through the mouth), topical (skin), transmucosal (nasal, buccal/sublingual, vaginal, ocular and rectal) and inhalation routes. Current effort in the area of drug delivery include the development of targeted delivery in which the drug is only active in the target area of the body (for example, in cancerous tissues) and sustained release formulations in which the drug is released over a period of time in a controlled manner from a formulation. This is achieved by combining electroporation with the input of drugs at a location. This paper reviews the process of electroporation and then further discusses the electrochemotherapy, one of the most upcoming application of electroporation in biotechnology.

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  • Maori and psychology: Indigenous psychology in New Zealand

    Nikora, Linda Waimarie (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Maori have their own approaches to health and well-being, which stem from a world view that values balance, continuity, unity and purpose. The world view is not typically thought of as 'psychology', yet it is a foundation for shared understandings and intelligible action among Maori. Maori behaviours, values, ways of doing things and understandings are often not visible nor valued. However, through these opening years of the twenty-first century, psychologists are slowly turning their attention to addressing this invisibility with the explicit agenda of building 'indigenous psychologies'

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  • The influence of context on science curricula: Observations, conclusions and some recommendations for curriculum development and implementation

    Coll, Richard K.; Taylor, Neil (2008)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The genesis of this project and book was our experiences of teaching science and science education at various levels in developing countries; in the Pacific and the Caribbean. These experiences along with numerous conversations with other teachers and educators who had worked in Africa and elsewhere left us with something of a sense of despair. We constantly confronted Western or foreign science curricula which were plainly alien to science learners in non-Western contexts. We witnessed numerous curricula reforms and professional development initiatives, many of which seemed doomed to failure. In fact Helu-Thaman (1991) referred to the ‘wreckage’ of aid-funded curricula initiatives all around the Pacific. Probably the most alarming aspect in all of this was the role of the foreign expert. Someone, normally ‘aid-funded’, who turned up for a short period of time to tell the locals what they should be doing! The naiveté of some of these people was truly remarkable (or perhaps they just didn’t care?). Failure of the program or reforms was generally attributed to the locals not ‘seeing it through’ or not quite understanding the new curriculum initiatives. There was little effort made to take into account local conditions or the views of local experts, especially teachers.

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  • Wine maturation using high electric field

    Talele, Sadhana; Benseman, Mark (2013)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Wine maturation can take a long time and consumes storage space which can be a drawback while considering commercial aspect of wine making. In the past scientists have carried out experiments on maturing wine quickly using ultrasounds or gamma radiations. This study reports about maturing wine with high electric field at different frequencies applied for a short time duration. The electric field intensity and the frequency of the field along with the exposure time of wine to this field seem to be important parameters that could affect the the treated wine. Results obtained are encouraging and have a potential for commercial interest.

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  • Revisioning the Pacific: Bernard Smith in the South Seas

    Ryan, Tom (2005)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    BORN IN Sydney in 1986, Bernard Smith is today widely considered to be Australia's preeminent art historian and a major cultural theorist.¹ While working as a school teacher and artist during the late 1930S and early 1940s, he came under the influences of surrealist aesthetics and communist politics, especially as mediated by refugee intellectuals from Hitler's Europe. During this period his principal literary inspirations were the Bible, Marx, and Toynbee; it was their different takes on history, especially of its unfolding over long durations, that most impressed him.² As an academic and writer through the next half century, Smith produced numerous historically oriented studies of Australian and modernist art, which broadly can be divided into two periods of publishing activity.³ His most acclaimed achievement, however, is European Vision and the South Pacific 1768-1850: A Study in the History of Art and Ideas, first published in 1960 and a work that has continued to grow in stature and influence in the four decades since its original appearance. It is the history of this text, and of its companion-piece, Imagining the Pacific: In the Wake of the Cook Voyages, published in 1992, and the contexts in which they were produced and have been consumed, that are the main concerns of the present essay.⁴

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  • Implementation considerations in supervisory control

    Malik, Robi; Dietrich, Petra; Wonham, W. M.; Brandin, Bertil A. (2001-06)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    With supervisory control theory it is possible to describe controllers which influence the behaviour of a system by disabling controllable events. But sometimes it is desirable to have a controller which not only disables controllable events but also chooses one among the enabled ones. This event can be interpreted as a command given to the plant. This idea is formalized in the concept of an implementation, which is a special supervisor, enabling at most one controllable event at a time. In this paper, some useful properties are introduced, which ensure, when met, that each implementation of a given DES is nonblocking. The approach is applied to a simple chemical batch process example.

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  • From assimilation to biculturalism: Changing patterns in Maori-Pakeha relationships

    Thomas, David R.; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (1996)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    This chapter examines the changing patterns of inter-ethnic relationships among Maori and Pakeha in New Zealand, specifically the moves from assimilation towards biculturalism. The impact of recent debate about the Treaty of Waitangi is described and examples of bicultural policies and their consequences are outlined.

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  • Researching Identities: Impact of the Performance-Base Research Fund on the Subject(s) of Education

    Middleton, Sue (2006)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    My argument begins by introducing key conceptual tools, applying them to the formative years of Education as a university subject. Second, I sketch a brief history of the subject in New Zealand in the 1980s and 1990s, emphasising its contradictory mandates as both academic and professional/clinical discipline. Third, I explore interviewees’ experiences and perspectives during and immediately after the quality evaluation process (Middleton, 2005a). The conclusion suggests ways the evaluation model might change to support (not penalise) Education’s dual mandate to enhance research capacity and outputs and to produce good practitioners for the teaching professions.

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  • Gravel galore: Impacts of clear-cut logging on salmon and their habitats

    Hicks, Brendan J. (2002)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    Timber harvest may have both direct and indirect effects on salmon, and with a few exceptions those effects result in lowered survival of salmon in their stream habitats compared with unlogged forest (Hicks et al. 1991b). Some impacts may be seen immediately or shortly after logging, whereas others can take decades to be expressed. Central to analyzing these effects is the context of the freshwater environment in which salmon are spawned and reared, and the life histories of the salmon species. This chapter will examine the effects of timber harvest on the freshwater habitat and life stages of salmon. It will also investigate the hypothesis that the salmon species least affected by timber harvest are those with the least reliance on stream habitats.

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  • Sensation and perception

    Perrone, John A. (2007)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    One of the oldest and most difficult questions in science is how we are able to develop an awareness of the world around us from our senses. Topics covered under the title of, 'Sensation and perception' address this very question. Sensation encompasses the processes by which our sense organs (e.g. eyes, ears etc.) receive information from our environment, whereas perception refers to the processes through which the brain selects, integrates, organises and interprets those sensations. The sorts of questions dealt with by psychologists interested in this area include: 'how does visual information get processed by the brain?', 'how is it that I am able to recognise one face out of many many thousands?', and 'what causes visual illusions to occur?: Within New Zealand there are a number of researchers studying visual perception specifically and their research interests range from understanding the biological

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  • "I my own professor": Ashton-Warner as New Zealand educational theorist, 1940-60.

    Middleton, Sue (2006)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The invitation to contribute to this volume addressed me as a New Zealander who had written about how Sylvia Ashton-Warner's fantasies, theories, imagery, and life-history narratives threaded their way through my own. I had written of my youthful encounters with her work in Educating Feminists (Middleton 1993), in which I looked back on reading Spinster in 1960 at age thirteen and reflected on my teenage dreams of life as an artist and beatnik in Parisian cafes and garrets: confined to an Edwardian boarding school hostel in a provincial New Zealand town, I had plotted my escape to what Ashton-Warner described in Myself as "some bohemian studio on the Left Bank in Paris or over a bowl of wine in Italy, me all sophisticated and that, with dozens of lovers, paint everywhere and love and communion and sympathy and all that" (Myself, 212). When, in the early 1970s, I began secondary school teaching and read Teacher, that book built bridges between the frightening urgency of classroom survival, the enticing theories but alien classrooms described by American deschoolers and free-schoolers, and "what I believed myself to be when a girl on the long long road to school, a vagabond and an artist" (I Passed This Way, 307). As a young teacher I, too, had poured my impassioned soul into writing journals and poetry, painting, and playing the piano. Like Ashton-Warner, I had hoped that artistic self-expression could keep the mad woman in my attic at bay, for "asylums are full of artists who failed to say the things they must and famous tombs are full of those who did" (Incense to Idols, 169).

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