34 results for Whitireia Community Polytechnic

  • Facilitating independent learning amongst Chinese international Students

    Warring, Susan (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This paper is the first part of a longitudinal study focussing on facilitating independent learning amongst Chinese International students completing the Bachelor of Applied Business Studies at Whitireia Polytechnic. The major rationale advanced for developing independence is that this an important graduate competency required by Western employers. Evidence from the literature indicates that new Chinese international students will initially have a low level of willingness and ability to practise independent learning.

    A model of independence is developed based on the Staged Self-Directed Learning model (Grow, 1991) and on the Situational Model of Leadership (Hersey & Blanchard, cited in Hersey & Blanchard, 1996). Grow's model characterises four learning levels ranging from dependent to self-directed and it is proposed that, if suitable teaching strategies are employed, students should progress towards higher levels of independence as they advance through the degree.

    Confirming the evidence from the literature review, the findings indicate that the class is at level two of independence. Suitable teaching strategies for level two learners will be developed and implemented in parts two and three of this project.

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  • Where are beginning teachers' stories about learning to teach in culturally and socially diverse secondary school classrooms?

    Patrick, Rachel (2010-01-11)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This paper reviews the literature related to an in-depth, narrative study currently being carried out on how beginning secondary teachers in culturally and socially diverse classrooms in New Zealand shape their professional knowledge and practice. Recent governmental reports from New Zealand, Australia and the UK highlight ongoing concern about beginning teacher retention and about the variability of the quality of new teacher induction programmes. The literature explored in this paper also discusses the issues for teachers arising from recent social and technological changes and the development of new teachers' professional knowledge. Little research has been found, to date, about the perspectives of the beginning teachers. This paper argues for the need to find out, from beginning teachers themselves, how they experience and represent the professional, political, social and cultural issues they face. This is presented as necessary if we are to understand better how to harness their expertise and commitment in schools, and prepare teachers who have a positive impact on the quality of outcomes for diverse students.

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  • Method or madness? The path to successful undergraduate research.

    Patrick, Rachel (2010-01-11)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This paper discusses the process undertaken to guide and support third year Diploma of Teaching (ECE) students through small research projects carried out during a practicum placement. From setting and defining their own topics, ethical considerations and data collection and analysis, students develop a sound understanding of research skills and processes. The structure and support systems provided have ensured that students and their practicum centres find the studies useful and relevant. A significant outcome from the research projects has been the enhancement of the critical thinking and analytical skills of students and their ability to apply the learning in their ongoing professional development as practising teachers.

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  • Critical Case Study: Supporting the New Graduate Nurse Entering Specialist Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Practice

    Haggerty, Carmel (2009-12-24)

    Scholarly Text
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This critical case study was undertaken for the purposes of illuminating information relating to new graduate nurses' experiences in their first clinical placement, in order to consider ways an established entry to practice programme (the programme) can better support and enhance the students' transition from student nurse to staff nurse within psychiatric mental health nursing practice.

    Seven of the 1999 students of the programme participated in the research. The project provided the researcher with a variety of challenges related to her dual role as researcher and programme coordinator. Data was collected through the use of discussion groups, participants and researcher jointly identifying the themes that were explored. These themes related to preceptorship and support, socialisation of the new graduate and risk management.

    The research has provided rich data that has and will continue to be used to inform future developments within both the educational and clinical components of the programme. The research has also provided opportunities for personal and professional growth through the sharing of experiences and working together to identify emancipatory action which has in turn led to transformation.

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  • Does seclusion result in a calmer patient?

    Trimmer, Wendy (2010-01-08)

    Journal article
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This critically appraised topic focuses on seclusion as an intervention for acutely mentally unwell patients. Seclusion is defined as "the placing of a person, at any time and for any duration, alone in an area where he/she cannot freely exit" (Ministry of Health, 2001, p. 43). Seclusion can be legally implemented under the Mental Health (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act 1992 when "other methods of clinical management cannot safely be used, or have been used without success" (p. 34). Despite the common use of seclusion as an intervention, it is suggested that many patients feel that seclusion does not have a calming effect.

    The following is an example of how seclusion is explored against evidence-based practice. A scenario, search question and terms are identified. A literature search was undertaken and Greenhalgh (2001) was utilised to assess methodological quality. The most relevant research article that would assist in answering the search question was identified and is critically appraised as follows.

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  • Cooperative learning: a double edged sword

    Baker, Trish (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Although there has been very little research done in co-operative learning in New Zealand, international research is positive about the educational benefits of working in culturally diverse groups. This paper presents the findings of a research project examining New Zealand experiences with co-operative learning in multicultural groups. The paper presents findings from surveys and focus groups with both domestic and international students and with New Zealand tertiary lecturers who use collaborative learning techniques in their programmes. The findings from this research indicate that there is a strong cultural conflict in the conceptualisation of cooperative learning between international students with little prior experience of cooperative learning and New Zealand lecturers who are often not fully prepared to help international students to bridge the gaps. The majority of international students value lecturers' programme content delivery and the achievement of high marks over the development of interpersonal skills; this is contrary to New Zealand lecturers' belief that the development of team skills is the most important outcome from cooperative learning. This cognitive dissonance reinforces the importance of understanding cultural differences and their impact on student patterns of classroom behaviour. This paper recommends that domestic and international students be prepared more effectively for cooperative learning and that lecturers be trained in designing curricula and assessment programmes that are pedagogically sound and culturally accommodating. The paper proposes a model to assist lecturers to achieve this aim.

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  • Using library stocktaking data to make evidence-based decisions about library procedures and policies

    Parker, Ailsa (2010-01-08)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    A stocktake prior to a move to a new building ensures that holdings on the library catalogue are accurate and items on the shelves arranged correctly. Whitireia Community Polytechnic at Porirua, New Zealand, followed this procedure. Regular stocktakes had been done, but some investigation into best practice was required as the stocktake was to be electronic rather than manual. A loss rate was identified as well as problem areas, and evidence gained from the stocktake was then appraised and evaluated in terms of other data from within the library system e.g. the previous stocktake, item loan records and intra-campus loan data. Results were benchmarked against other academic libraries, although New Zealand data was difficult to obtain. A set of recommendations and best practice guidelines was then drawn up. Probably one of the most useful sources of benchmarking data and guidelines was Theft and loss from UK libraries: a national survey. This 1992 paper from the Crime Prevention Unit Series by John Burrows and Diane Cooper, details definition, frequency, extent and nature of loss from British libraries.

    The library is now in its new building and the results of any future stocktake will need to be examined in terms of changes to the physical layout of the library e.g. non-library staff can exit the building without going through security gates, the staff information desk is now a considerable distance from the security gates and users have access to an external deck. A separate Maori collection has also been created. In addition, recent well-publicised thefts from New Zealand libraries has generated some literature on the subject of stocktaking and theft, so this can also be incorporated into future benchmarking and planning.

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  • LATAR: A framework for paper design and lesson planning

    Haggerty, Carmel (2011-11-25)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This presentation introduces the LATAR framework along with seven principles and provides examples of using the framework for curriculum alighnment, paper development and lesson planning in the Health Faculty at Whitireia Polytechnic.

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  • Trailblazers - primary health care programme evaluation

    Holloway, Kathy (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Trailblazers are those that forge the way to enable others to follow. This report is an evaluation of the academic journey undertaken by a group of newly graduated nurses who were sponsored by a New Zealand District Health Board (DHB) to work in a variety of primary health care nursing settings. The impetus for this pilot employment option was the Ministry of Health's focus on primary health care nursing and workforce development for this sector and the Expert Advisory Committee for primary health care nursing's recommendations to DHB's regarding employment of graduate nurses and support for them to engage in post graduate study. Evaluation participants were primarily the graduate nurses who were interviewed at the end of their first year of practice which was following programme completion then again nine to ten months later. Findings include the nurses reflections on what supported them and what acted to impede as barriers to their learning success and practice development. The report concludes with five recommendations that can be used to ensure that the travels of future newly graduated nurses taking this pathway are supported, safe and successful.

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  • Work-related stress: the experiences of polytechnic teachers: literature review

    Tennant, Joanna (2010-01-11)

    Scholarly Text
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    There is an enormous body of research literature on the subject of work-related stress, mostly from the 1960s onwards. This review focuses on the research literature relevant to teacher stress; it begins with an overview of the main current theoretical models and conceptualisations of occupational stress, followed by an analysis of the research approaches to the field of teacher stress. With this contextual framework established, the research literature on teacher stress is then examined in some detail, focussing in turn on each of the aspects of work-related stress under study: the incidence, effects and causes of stress, the moderating factors involved, and coping strategies employed. For each of these aspects, discussion of the research findings for teacher stress generally and in the compulsory sector are followed by particular examination of research in the tertiary sector, and when available, in polytechnics. Particular attention is paid to New Zealand research.

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  • Is the economic crisis here worse than the US?

    Thomas, Rosita (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This paper is an attempt to find out what impact an 'Economic Crisis' would have on New Zealand. The discussion would be centred on the various businesses in New Zealand, keeping the downturn in the finance sector as a focal point. As employees in educational institutions, would we be affected? It would be worthwhile to see what changes could occur if a crisis does occur in New Zealand

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  • Resourcing a research culture: the roles of the library and the research assistant at Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Parker, Ailsa (2010-01-08)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    In 1994 the New Zealand Qualifications Authority granted Whitireia Community Polytechnic approval for a nursing degree and in the year 2000, the School of Computing introduced a Bachelor of Information Technology. The granting of these degrees, with their research component, has meant that a research culture has had to be developed. Characteristics of productive research environments have been identified as including resources, particularly human resources. Since staff teaching on a degree programmes have to be actively engaged in research, there is increasing pressure to teach as well as research. As with many tertiary institutions, this demand often puts staff in an unbalanced situation, unable to find the time for research given a sometimes heavy teaching load. The institution has reacted to this pressure and new patterns of support are emerging. A case study approach, using organisational role theory, is used to examine Whitireia Community Polytechnic's strategies of resourcing research and researchers. Documentary sources such as reports and policy documents and participant-observations are used to analyse the roles of the research assistant and of library services. The primary function of these supporting roles is to be of practical and academic assistance and to ensure that the staff are properly channeled through the necessary research processes and networks that could help them. The efficacy of these roles at Whitireia Community Polytechnic is discussed in terms of research literature and role theory. Both roles, in different ways, were found to be contributing to a productive research environment. Suggestions are made for future research.

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  • Slowly but surely: Tortoise's winning strategy: A case study of undergraduates' beliefs, reported use and actual use of vocabulary learning strategies in mastery of academic and technical vocabulary in BN year one

    Silvester, Mary (2010-01-11)

    Scholarly Text
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This study investigates what first-year EAL nursing students believe about vocabulary learning, what strategies they report using, whether there are patterns in their actual use of vocabulary learning strategies as they read technical texts, and whether there are discrepancies between reported and actual use of particular strategies. In a case study, evidence of reliability is provided by "carefully documenting and reporting the details of the observation procedure, and by including a rich description of the participants, the situation, and the researcher's role in the observation process and his or her theoretical perspective" (Bachman, 2004, p.726). To this end, an affective interview, three observations using think-aloud protocol, a stimulated recall session, receptive vocabulary tests and receptive and productive medical vocabulary tests were used.

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  • Great oaks from tiny acorns: the beginnings of TESOL in New Zealand

    Wallace, Leith (2009-12-23)

    Journal article
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    TESOL is now a multi-million dollar industry, and an integral part of the New Zealand education system, but it had its beginnings as a foreign aid initiative, based in a two-storey brick and wooden house at the edge of Victoria University's campus. Some great names in education in New Zealand have been part of this development, centred on the English Language Institute at Victoria University of Wellington. The history and importance of the institute is recorded.

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  • We carry their stories: Narratives of cultural safety practice in day-to-day nursing practice

    Richardson, Fran (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This paper discusses selected findings of a PhD research project. The research investigates the way registered nurses apply cultural safety knowledge in their day-to-day nursing practice.

    Cultural safety education sits within a critical framework and focuses on power relations in the delivery of health care. The concept grew out of the identity politics movements of the 1970s and 1980s. Identity politics asserts that individuals and groups have the right to claim an identity that is reflective of how they see themselves rather than how others see them. Identity politics asserts the right for marginalised individuals and groups to claim and occupy the same social, public and political spaces as their more dominant counterparts.

    Cultural safety was introduced into the New Zealand nursing curriculum in 1992 (Ramsden, 1993). Since that time little research has been undertaken which specifically explores how registered nurses apply cultural safety knowledge in their day-to-day practice. The focus of cultural safety is on how the nurse understands and works with power in the context of health care. It is about the nurse coming to understand how attitudes and beliefs shape, influence or affect the delivery of nursing and health care. Central to this understanding is the nurse's willingness to recognise notions of difference within health care relationships.

    This research uses a narrative approach to explore the question "the ways registered nurses apply cultural safety in their day to day nursing practice". It is through the researcher's interpretation of story that the qualitative experience of culturally safe nursing practice is illuminated. Narrative methodology informed the approach to interviewing sixteen registered nurses from a range of practice areas within New Zealand. The nurses were asked for stories about how they applied cultural safety knowledge in their day-to-day practice. It is how these stories were co - constructed, given meaning by the participants, and interpreted by the researcher which provided the data for analysis and discussion.

    This paper draws on selected stories of cultural safety in practice to highlight the multifaceted nature of cultural safety and reveals the complexity and multiple influences on the application of cultural safety knowledge in practice.

    The paper concludes with a summary of how this research might contribute to the development of new understandings about what cultural safety means as nursing moves further into the 21st century.

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  • The way things are done around here: perceptions of clinical leadership in mental health nursing

    Trimmer, Wendy (2009-12-24)

    Scholarly Text
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Clinical leadership is the cornerstone to improved health outcomes and workforce development (Graham, 2003; Mental Health Workforce Development, 2005). This research project explored nurses' perceptions of clinical leadership in mental health nursing practice. Within New Zealand no research exists that evaluates the role and impact the clinical leadership has in mental health nursing practice. From personal experience and discussion with colleagues I argue that clinical leadership in terms of support and guidance for nurses is often minimal and that there is a relationship between qualities of clinical leadership and poor retention rates of mental health nurses. The prime objective of this study was to increase knowledge about clinical leadership in mental health nursing practice. This research used a quantitative descriptive methodology, utilising survey design. A questionnaire was used to rank the attributes of the person the respondents identified as a clinical leader. The data was collected from 30 registered nurses working in mental health settings within the central region of New Zealand. Data analysis was performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Version 10, including descriptive statistics and group correlations. Three open-ended questions sought the respondents' opinion of how clinical leadership influenced their nursing practice, what clinical leadership skills were useful for assisting and retaining nurses and what barriers existed to prevent effective leadership. Responses to the three open-ended questions were analysed for their thematic content. Findings indicate that there is room for improvement with regard to clinical leadership in mental health nursing practice. Clinical leadership is perceived to be more effective by nurses in their second year of practice and in community settings. A statistically significant difference was indicated between nurses in their second year of practice and nurses in their third year of practice in terms of their ranking of clinical leadership abilities. Overall the respondents perceived poor communication and poor attitude as the biggest barriers to effective leadership. Support and good role models were said to influence nursing practice positively and the skills that were identified as being helpful in assisting and retaining nurses were mentorship and good communication. The results of the study are discussed in relation to the literature on transformational leadership skills. Finally, the general limitations of the study are outlined and implications for future research are discussed.

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  • Students' experiences of the online learning environment: Working toward improvement

    Haggerty, Carmel (2009-12-24)

    Scholarly Text
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    The evaluation outlined in this paper illuminates issues relating to access and use of the on-line component of the Postgraduate Certificate in Nursing (Mental Health). This programme is offered annually to Registered Nurses from a wide geographical base. All students enrolled in the programme, have recently completed a Bachelor of Nursing programme and are not classed as new learners. Although the students come together for five weeks of the year, the programme is primarily classified as a distance programme. The programme utilises Blackboard (Bb) to provide online support for students throughout the year. There had been no requirement for students to actively participate in the Bb environment, until 2006 when a formative assessment process was required to be posted on Bb. The evaluation took place during the second semester of two consecutive programmes, 2005 and 2006. The structured illuminative enquiry was undertaken using ethnic-based discussion groups during the 2005 programme, as well as a survey questionnaire completed by the students in the 2006 programme. Some supported quantitative data was collected during both years, using existing statistical capacities within Blackboard.

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  • Elearning and academic workloads: what is the role of professional development

    Haggerty, Carmel (2011-11-24)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Academic workloads are influenced by many variables, such as the preparedness of the academic, the institutional eLearning philosophy, institutional support processes and professional development available. Due to these complex variables it is difficult to measure academic workloads in isolation. However, one key variable -- professional development -- stands out as having the potential to make a substantive impact on academic workloads.

    A research project exploring academic workloads in eLearning across four applied health degrees highlighted a disconnect between academics and the service groups supporting them. Discussion groups and individual interviews were undertaken with academic staff, their programme leaders, online learning support staff and senior management, providing an institutional overview of what is a complex issue.

    Most academics within applied health degrees commence their educational career as specialists within their chosen profession, rather than as professional educators. Professional development related to teaching and learning is varied and in some cases nonexistent. This is no different in the case of academics working within the eLearning environment. Professional development is often focussed on the technological aspects of eLearning rather than its pedagogy, and is reported by academics as a barrier to implementation. With little preparation for their role as educators, is it any wonder that academics within the applied health sciences are often struggling with incorporating eLearning into their teaching? Key reasons reported by academics were:

    • that eLearning increases their workloads, particularly during design and development,

    • that the technology is complex and often unreliable, and

    • that engaging with students online was too time-consuming.

    One key recommendation from the research was that professional development that focuses on the pedagogy and practice of teaching and learning is critical in supporting academics to better understand and manage their own workloads within the eLearning context.

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  • Often wearisome, sometimes saddening, but always interesting.

    Arcus, Kerri (2009-12-24)

    Scholarly Text
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    WellingtonOctober 2003 marked the centenary of Wellington district nursing. Annie Holgate, a "trained, professional" nurse, was employed to care for the sick poor in 1903. The Wellington St John Ambulance District Nursing Guild funded district nursing for over fifty years. The first president, Sarah Ann Rhodes, left a legacy of a solid financial and administrative base for the whole of the Guild's existence. From 1945 the Wellington Hospital Board assumed responsibility for district nursing and expanded the service to the greater Wellington region. In 1974 the Community Health Services were formed, with Pauline MacInnes as the nurse leader. Expansion of healthcare in the community ensued, with district nurses pivotal to client-centred, community-based, collaborative healthcare. This service was dismantled in the wake of health sector restructuring in 1989. The philosophy and operation of the Community Health Service of this period bears a striking resemblance to the current concept of Primary Health Care. Primary sources from Wellington St John, Kai Tiaki and data from official publications were used to compile this history. Emergent themes are the autonomy of district nurses' practice, the invisibility of district nursing and the impact of visionary leadership. All have implications for the future of district nursing.

    District nursing, initially dependent on philanthropy, has been publicly funded in New Zealand since 1944. District nursing is now an essential component of health care.

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  • Cooperative learning: theory into practice

    Baker, Trish (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    At the 2008 IASCE/IAIE conference in Turin, Trish Baker and Jill Clark presented a model for using assessed cooperative learning techniques with ethnically and linguistically diverse groups. The model consisted of four steps: training lecturers in cooperative learning techniques, training students in cooperative learning techniques, monitoring the groups' performance, and debriefing both lecturers and students. This research paper and presentation reports on a New Zealand tertiary business course that piloted the model with culturally diverse student groups. Results from this pilot study suggest that the thorough preparation and monitoring of diverse student groups by a lecturer trained in cooperative learning techniques led to superior academic achievement and greater student satisfaction for most groups. Successful groups were able to identify the skills they had acquired from the cooperative experience, particularly the transferable skills. Not all groups, however, derived the full benefit from the use of the model. Issues of individual motivation, openness to feedback,and a lack of generic skills contributed to the comparatively poor performance of one of the groups. The results of this research project suggest that the challenges of implementing cooperative learning groups wih culturally and linguistically diverse groups may be met by ensuring that both lecturers and students follow the guidelines outlined in the model. This paper recommends further trialing of the model with a larger sample.

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