34 results for Whitireia Community Polytechnic

  • 'Three Key Elements' Mental Health Delivery Toward Maori

    Neilson-Hornblow, Cherene (2009-12-24)

    Scholarly Text
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This project titled 'Three Key Elements' Mental Health Delivery Toward Maori explores literature on mental health service delivery in Aotearoa/New Zealand for Maori over the last thirty years. The evolution of changes in mental health delivery is traced and how this has affected Maori mental health status, Maori socioeconomic realities and the delivery of mental health services to Maori. This paper traces the changes to three modes of mental health delivery from a psychiatric institution in the 1970s through to community-focused care in the 1980s, and telenursing in the 1990s. In this project I position myself using a metaphor which encompasses my cultural, personal and professional area of expertise in mental health nursing. Interwoven are reflective accounts of my brother Sidney's journey as a tangata whaiora in mental health services. I explore those factors which our whanau had to challenge in response to poor access, information and support in mental health at this time. I also trace Maori realities and Maori health status in the 1950s and the transition of Maori to urban society through to the 1960s. Urbanisation provided opportunities and also pressures for Maori and it was these pressures that led to Sidney becoming unwell in the 1970s. A renaissance in the 1980s of Maori activism explores Maori expression to improve Maori health status and better socioeconomic conditions. The Treaty of Waitangi as the foundation of health policy and service delivery is discussed. Cultural safety was developed to educate nurses about cultural awareness and difference in providing nursing care. In the 1990s kaupapa Maori services were established demonstrating improved service delivery, with Maori health professionals and Maori mental health frameworks which endorse Maori by Maori services. The paper concludes by exploring mental health telenursing and recommendations for healthcare delivery to improve the health of Maori. My vision for futuristic health and wellbeing for Maori is to provide a nationwide kaupapa Maori healthline.

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  • Is the economic crisis here worse than the US?

    Thomas, Rosita (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This paper is an attempt to find out what impact an 'Economic Crisis' would have on New Zealand. The discussion would be centred on the various businesses in New Zealand, keeping the downturn in the finance sector as a focal point. As employees in educational institutions, would we be affected? It would be worthwhile to see what changes could occur if a crisis does occur in New Zealand

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  • Library website accessibility: a case study

    Parker, Ailsa (2010-01-08)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Libraries devote considerable time and expense to ensuring that disabled users can physically access the library. Is the same amount of thought, however, going into Web page development. Do sites provide support for technologies such as audio readers? Are they compliant with the W3C Web Accessibility Initiative standards? This presentation discusses Bobby, a free software that can quickly check for compliance; shares research results of testing the Web pages of New Zealand polytechnic libraries with Bobby; and compares the results with overseas research.

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  • The intimate real

    Whitehead-Lopez, Rudy (2009-12-23)

    Scholarly Text
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    I explore family interactions within the non-spectacular, quiet instances of everyday living. My interest is in intimate moments of insulation. My choice of subject matter and approach to the subject has been influenced by my Mexican-American heritage. I draw on cultural influences like Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo and Richard Diebenkorn to structure my work. My paintings are figurative and in a realist milieu. They are based on observation and experience filtered through my subjective concept of ingenuous representation within the shifting context of perception and context. I look for open narrative potential that will ignite recognition within the viewer, and generate a personal dialogue with ample scope to attribute their own meanings within the work. To understand how this process can be achieved I have developed a structure of visual language based on Roman Jakobson and Wolfgang Iser's literary models of communication. I propose that the process of interaction places meaning within the artist/viewer relationship primarily in the decoding by the viewer. Within my own code, which is a hybrid mix of cultural influences, there is enough of a commonality with most viewers for a meaningful discourse.

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  • 'Opening our eyes-shifting our thinking'

    Scott, Wendy (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    The purpose of the research was an evaluation of practice exemplars as a reflective process in teaching and learning about cultural safety. Six Maori, two Pacific and five Pakeha students, ranging in age from 30 to 40, took part in the research. The research findings revealed five sub themes: personal safety, power/ powerlessness, reflection, teaching and learning and cultural safety. The presentation, while acknowledging that cultural safety shared some commonalities with culture care theory, highlighted differences between the two. These included that cultural safety was explicit in identifying the inherent power of the nurse in health care relationships; related to the experience of the recipient of nursing care, and extended beyond cultural awareness and sensitivity; provided consumers of nursing services with the power to comment on practices; and contributed to the achievement of positive outcomes and experiences for them. It outlined the characteristics of a culturally safe nurse as a nurse who had undertaken a process of reflection on her/his own cultural identity and who recognised the impact their personal culture had on client care.

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  • Jewellery out of context

    Shepheard, Carole ; Deckers, Peter (2009-12-23)

    Book item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Jewellery Out of Context (joc) is an exhibition of 24 submissions created by 31 New Zealand artists (immigrants, emigrants, migrants, and natives to New Zealand). The exhibition was held at the Muse, Ultimo, Sydney in early 2006. The artists explore the relationships and transformations of jewellery in its wider context.

    The joc brief is open-ended, with the aim to reveal and unravel the many facets related to the formation and organisation of the jewellery discourse. This exhibition aims to provoke the jewellery community by deconstructing and reassembling its most elementary principle "made to wear". Instead this exhibition is put together as a playful token for its own centralised existence, like: "jewellery" has a good look to itself, or "jewellery" dresses up for its own party.

    The motivation to include in the "call for entries" multi-disciplines relates also to the aims of the 2006 Jewellers' and Metalsmiths' Group of Australia (jmga) theme, which is "to take makers, collectors,critics and thinkers out of the comfort zone of their normal environments and place them 'on location'; a hypothetical site where speculation, inspiration and the accidental can emerge and diverge, questioning the place of the production of meaning and the meaning of production". In the joc exhibition a combination of the craft, design and fine art practices can be detected side-by-side, the crossbreds and the purebreds. This exhibition has no format, other then to celebrate jewellery and its related world. What is precious and what is non-precious seen through the eyes of artists will transform relationships and positions of normality. It is made special by the reflection of who we are and what we like to be. This exhibition invited artists to look beyond, but not away from the phenomena of object ornamentation and object psychology. Trends and fashions occupy the object maker in its transfixed craft art practice, which is shared closely but not exclusively by the fine art temperaments.

    Peter Deckers (Curator)

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  • Great oaks from tiny acorns: the beginnings of TESOL in New Zealand

    Wallace, Leith (2009-12-23)

    Journal article
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    TESOL is now a multi-million dollar industry, and an integral part of the New Zealand education system, but it had its beginnings as a foreign aid initiative, based in a two-storey brick and wooden house at the edge of Victoria University's campus. Some great names in education in New Zealand have been part of this development, centred on the English Language Institute at Victoria University of Wellington. The history and importance of the institute is recorded.

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  • Experiential learning in the multicultural classroom as applied to a Market Research class

    Klose, Markus (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Society's expectation of tertiary education providers, and especially polytechnics, is that they will "produce" skilled, workforce-ready graduates. Tertiary teachers are expected not only to provide students with relevant knowledge of an academic discipline, but also to develop employability skills in students .This paper discusses the author's experience in using an experiential learning strategy for a second-year degree paper in the field of Market Research to a multicultural group of student from Asian backgrounds. The author's aim is to provide students with a learning environment, where they can acquire discipline knowledge and skills which are relevant for their future employment. This paper does not provide a systematic evaluation of the effectiveness of this approach, but aims at sharing ideas and experience with participants of the Learning and Teaching Conference in an interactive round-table discussion.

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  • Developing the Pacific nursing workforce

    Southwick, Margaret (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Currently, the New Zealand nursing workforce is predominantly pakeha. The growing proportion of Pacific people in the wider population is not being reflected in the New Zealand nursing workforce. Previous research by Southwick showed that Pacific Island students had a high drop out rate from nursing programmes. In 2004, the Bachelor in Nursing (Pacific) programme commenced at Whitireia Community Polytechnic. Challenges and results of this programme are discussed.

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  • Cooperative learning: a double edged sword

    Baker, Trish (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Although there has been very little research done in co-operative learning in New Zealand, international research is positive about the educational benefits of working in culturally diverse groups. This paper presents the findings of a research project examining New Zealand experiences with co-operative learning in multicultural groups. The paper presents findings from surveys and focus groups with both domestic and international students and with New Zealand tertiary lecturers who use collaborative learning techniques in their programmes. The findings from this research indicate that there is a strong cultural conflict in the conceptualisation of cooperative learning between international students with little prior experience of cooperative learning and New Zealand lecturers who are often not fully prepared to help international students to bridge the gaps. The majority of international students value lecturers' programme content delivery and the achievement of high marks over the development of interpersonal skills; this is contrary to New Zealand lecturers' belief that the development of team skills is the most important outcome from cooperative learning. This cognitive dissonance reinforces the importance of understanding cultural differences and their impact on student patterns of classroom behaviour. This paper recommends that domestic and international students be prepared more effectively for cooperative learning and that lecturers be trained in designing curricula and assessment programmes that are pedagogically sound and culturally accommodating. The paper proposes a model to assist lecturers to achieve this aim.

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  • Students' experiences of the online learning environment: Working toward improvement

    Haggerty, Carmel (2009-12-24)

    Scholarly Text
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    The evaluation outlined in this paper illuminates issues relating to access and use of the on-line component of the Postgraduate Certificate in Nursing (Mental Health). This programme is offered annually to Registered Nurses from a wide geographical base. All students enrolled in the programme, have recently completed a Bachelor of Nursing programme and are not classed as new learners. Although the students come together for five weeks of the year, the programme is primarily classified as a distance programme. The programme utilises Blackboard (Bb) to provide online support for students throughout the year. There had been no requirement for students to actively participate in the Bb environment, until 2006 when a formative assessment process was required to be posted on Bb. The evaluation took place during the second semester of two consecutive programmes, 2005 and 2006. The structured illuminative enquiry was undertaken using ethnic-based discussion groups during the 2005 programme, as well as a survey questionnaire completed by the students in the 2006 programme. Some supported quantitative data was collected during both years, using existing statistical capacities within Blackboard.

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  • Hutt Valley nursing: training needs analysis

    Holloway, Kathy (2010-01-08)

    Scholarly Text
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    The Nursing Development Unit (NDU) at Hutt Valley District Health Board (HVDHB) has for a number of years published an annual training and education planner for nurses. Multiple changes have occurred over this time, both organizational and national. Key personnel in NDU, responsible for coordinating and publishing this plan, have left the organization. Increasing patient acuity, technological advances, changes in healthcare service delivery models and requirement to demonstrate ongoing competence under the HPCA Act has changed what is required of nurses. It was timely therefore in 2005 to review the training needs of nurses employed within the organization.

    This review by the Nursing Development Unit in conjunction with Whitireia Community Polytechnic included a questionnaire which was sent to three different role groups. Although there were limitations to the findings due to the poor response rate from registered nurses surveyed, the results and the literature supported the development of a planned approach to maximise the potential of education provided. This approach included the development of a framework for study days and the development of the annual planner.

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  • Slowly but surely: Tortoise's winning strategy: A case study of undergraduates' beliefs, reported use and actual use of vocabulary learning strategies in mastery of academic and technical vocabulary in BN year one

    Silvester, Mary (2010-01-11)

    Scholarly Text
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This study investigates what first-year EAL nursing students believe about vocabulary learning, what strategies they report using, whether there are patterns in their actual use of vocabulary learning strategies as they read technical texts, and whether there are discrepancies between reported and actual use of particular strategies. In a case study, evidence of reliability is provided by "carefully documenting and reporting the details of the observation procedure, and by including a rich description of the participants, the situation, and the researcher's role in the observation process and his or her theoretical perspective" (Bachman, 2004, p.726). To this end, an affective interview, three observations using think-aloud protocol, a stimulated recall session, receptive vocabulary tests and receptive and productive medical vocabulary tests were used.

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  • Research that works: a practical approach to student collaborative work

    Clark, Jill (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    The authors of this paper, who tutor at two different technical institutes, have collaborated for the past four years on a research project examining New Zealand experiences with student collaborative learning in multicultural groups. International research, while acknowledging the challenges involved, is positive about the educational benefits of working in diverse groups. There has been little New Zealand research, however, in this area. The first stage of this project identified issues that tertiary tutors faced when using collaborative learning in their classrooms. Subsequent findings of this research project have been consistent with the literature on the benefits and challenges of inter-cultural collaborative learning. The results indicate that students are often inadequately prepared for working in groups and therefore do not achieve the desired outcome of learning to work together constructively and collaboratively. The development of the 'soft skills' required by industry is often not achieved by either domestic or international students. This paper outlines the particular challenges faced by New Zealand tertiary tutors who wish to use collaborative learning techniques for assessment purposes. The findings from this and other research projects have been used to construct a model that will help tutors set up collaborative programmes that not only meet the basic requirements of effective collaborative learning but are also pedagogically sound and culturally accommodating. Such programmes will benefit tutors as well as domestic and international students.

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  • Libraries in Japan, Korea and China: a report by Ailsa Parker: Travelling scholarship to Asia, November to December 2002

    Parker, Ailsa (2010-01-11)

    Scholarly Text
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Awarded a Travelling Scholarship to Asia which was funded by the Ministry of Education and ACENZ, Ailsa Parker, a librarian from Whitireia Community Polytechnic, visited twenty-one libraries in Japan, Korea and China in the space of 23 days in November / December, 2002. These included national, university, high school and public libraries. Access to the libraries was gained through sister-city contacts, ACENZ links, Proquest International and National Library Associations. The importance of correct protocol, especially in Japan, became apparent when setting up appointments. The aim of the trip was to compare and contrast library conditions in those countries with those in New Zealand. Library literature indicated many differences and the literature and personal experience were used to develop criteria for observation. By dissemination of the results of the trip, it is hoped to improve the effectiveness and relevance of the library experiences offered to international students.

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  • Where are beginning teachers' stories about learning to teach in culturally and socially diverse secondary school classrooms?

    Patrick, Rachel (2010-01-11)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This paper reviews the literature related to an in-depth, narrative study currently being carried out on how beginning secondary teachers in culturally and socially diverse classrooms in New Zealand shape their professional knowledge and practice. Recent governmental reports from New Zealand, Australia and the UK highlight ongoing concern about beginning teacher retention and about the variability of the quality of new teacher induction programmes. The literature explored in this paper also discusses the issues for teachers arising from recent social and technological changes and the development of new teachers' professional knowledge. Little research has been found, to date, about the perspectives of the beginning teachers. This paper argues for the need to find out, from beginning teachers themselves, how they experience and represent the professional, political, social and cultural issues they face. This is presented as necessary if we are to understand better how to harness their expertise and commitment in schools, and prepare teachers who have a positive impact on the quality of outcomes for diverse students.

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  • Method or madness? The path to successful undergraduate research.

    Patrick, Rachel (2010-01-11)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    This paper discusses the process undertaken to guide and support third year Diploma of Teaching (ECE) students through small research projects carried out during a practicum placement. From setting and defining their own topics, ethical considerations and data collection and analysis, students develop a sound understanding of research skills and processes. The structure and support systems provided have ensured that students and their practicum centres find the studies useful and relevant. A significant outcome from the research projects has been the enhancement of the critical thinking and analytical skills of students and their ability to apply the learning in their ongoing professional development as practising teachers.

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  • Cooperative learning: theory into practice

    Baker, Trish (2009-12-23)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    At the 2008 IASCE/IAIE conference in Turin, Trish Baker and Jill Clark presented a model for using assessed cooperative learning techniques with ethnically and linguistically diverse groups. The model consisted of four steps: training lecturers in cooperative learning techniques, training students in cooperative learning techniques, monitoring the groups' performance, and debriefing both lecturers and students. This research paper and presentation reports on a New Zealand tertiary business course that piloted the model with culturally diverse student groups. Results from this pilot study suggest that the thorough preparation and monitoring of diverse student groups by a lecturer trained in cooperative learning techniques led to superior academic achievement and greater student satisfaction for most groups. Successful groups were able to identify the skills they had acquired from the cooperative experience, particularly the transferable skills. Not all groups, however, derived the full benefit from the use of the model. Issues of individual motivation, openness to feedback,and a lack of generic skills contributed to the comparatively poor performance of one of the groups. The results of this research project suggest that the challenges of implementing cooperative learning groups wih culturally and linguistically diverse groups may be met by ensuring that both lecturers and students follow the guidelines outlined in the model. This paper recommends further trialing of the model with a larger sample.

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  • Elearning and academic workloads: what is the role of professional development

    Haggerty, Carmel (2011-11-24)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Academic workloads are influenced by many variables, such as the preparedness of the academic, the institutional eLearning philosophy, institutional support processes and professional development available. Due to these complex variables it is difficult to measure academic workloads in isolation. However, one key variable -- professional development -- stands out as having the potential to make a substantive impact on academic workloads.

    A research project exploring academic workloads in eLearning across four applied health degrees highlighted a disconnect between academics and the service groups supporting them. Discussion groups and individual interviews were undertaken with academic staff, their programme leaders, online learning support staff and senior management, providing an institutional overview of what is a complex issue.

    Most academics within applied health degrees commence their educational career as specialists within their chosen profession, rather than as professional educators. Professional development related to teaching and learning is varied and in some cases nonexistent. This is no different in the case of academics working within the eLearning environment. Professional development is often focussed on the technological aspects of eLearning rather than its pedagogy, and is reported by academics as a barrier to implementation. With little preparation for their role as educators, is it any wonder that academics within the applied health sciences are often struggling with incorporating eLearning into their teaching? Key reasons reported by academics were:

    • that eLearning increases their workloads, particularly during design and development,

    • that the technology is complex and often unreliable, and

    • that engaging with students online was too time-consuming.

    One key recommendation from the research was that professional development that focuses on the pedagogy and practice of teaching and learning is critical in supporting academics to better understand and manage their own workloads within the eLearning context.

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  • Methodology in software development capstone projects

    Strode, Diane (2010-01-08)

    Conference item
    Whitireia Community Polytechnic

    Capstone projects which provide the opportunity for student teams to experience "real-world" software development form part of the final semester of study in many computing degrees. This paper describes a number of development methodologies that are currently used both in industry and software development capstone projects. Such projects are carried out under a unique set of constraints due to their nature as instances of experiential learning in an educational setting. These constraints are discussed and then a number of methodologies are described along with a discussion of the suitability of the methodology for capstone projects. Issues that must be addressed by instructors are considered. Finally recommendations are made and a plan for a study into capstone development methodologies is described. The goals of this paper are to provide an overview of current methodologies available for software development capstone projects, to clarify the benefits and problems encountered when using these methodologies in capstone projects, and to indicate suitable resources for those involved in these projects.

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