10 results for Abbiss, J.

  • The sum is greater than the parts: Understanding teacher educators' epistemological shifts through dual (interpretive and post-structural) meta-analyses

    Abbiss, J.; Quinlivan, K. (2012)


    University of Canterbury Library

    Paper presented in session 10 SES 02 A, 18 September 2012, 15:13-16:45. Programme available online at  http://www.eera-ecer.de/ecer-programmes/conference/6/network/134/

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  • Seeking cohesion in a teacher education programme : weaving conceptualisations, contexts and courses.

    Abbiss, J.; Astall, C. (2014)


    University of Canterbury Library

    In this paper we describe key elements of the teacher programme we have developed. This is a one-­‐year intensive professional preparation programme that integrates and interweaves research-­‐informed professional knowledge and evidence-­‐based inquiry with embedded practice-­‐based experiences. The programme is situated within a school-­‐university community of practice. Within the programme model we pay explicit attention to the development of “adaptive expertise” (Hatano & Inagaki, 1986) through the interweaving of the centralising constructs of “learning to practice” principles (Timperley, 2012) and “central tasks” of initial teacher education (Feiman-­‐Nemser, 2001) that align with research-­‐evidence on high-­‐quality initial teacher education programme design (Darling-­‐Hammond, et. al., 2005). We use a focused, iterative use of selected conceptual frameworks for practice that focus on the development of research-­‐ informed culturally responsive teaching-­‐learning practices. In our model we have situated ITE student learning in an intentionally co-­‐ constructed community of practice blended across locations and media. The programme is constituted as a contemporary learning environment, that is a purposeful blend of face-­‐to-­‐face and online learning. We have an explicit focus on working with Partner Schools with high populations of learners who are Māori, Pasifika, speakers of languages other than English, and those who experience particular learning needs (i.e. priority learners). We’ve designed embedded professional practice learning experiences, including experiences that go beyond the school walls to engage with families, whānau, hapū, iwi, aiga and the wider communities that support young people’s well-­‐being. There is multi-­‐disciplinary, cross-­‐sector collegial engagement among ITE students, school sector educators and university staff. Our mentoring/coaching model is co-­‐constructed by university and Partner School staff, while aligned to the development of adaptive expertise. We have an embedded and explicit use of a research-­‐based structure and method for the development of an evidence-­‐ based e-­‐portfolio to document ITE student learning and development as action competent teacher graduates, with a consistent use of an explicit inquiry/learning model across all coursework and professional practice learning experiences in the programme.

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  • Learning from students' experiences of IT courses

    Abbiss, J. (2006)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    The experiences of students in different types of specialist information technology (IT) classes, specifically classes in computer studies (CPS) and text and information management (TIM), vary considerably – both between classes and within the same class. However, there are common factors that define students’ experiences, identified here as expectations, prior experience, pedagogy and classroom relations. Focusing on students’ experiences raises questions and has implications for teachers in respect of classroom practice and curriculum development.

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  • Rethinking the 'problem' of gender and IT schooling: discourses in literature

    Abbiss, J. (2008)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    A review of the international research literature pertaining to gender and information technology (IT) schooling reveals changing ideas about what constitutes a gender problem. Much of the literature is concerned with gender differences in computer uses and interests and perceived disadvantages accruing to females as a result of these differences. This reflects and contributes to a dominant liberal equity discourse. Growing awareness of the limitations of earlier research, the changing nature of IT schooling, contradictions in students’ computer interests and dissatisfaction with simplistic explanations has led, however, to post-structural rethinking and the emergence of a critical discourse. Assumptions of essential differences and deficit ways of thinking are challenged. Persistent gender differences in IT use are explored in their social complexity and the very notion that there is a gender problem is problematised. This presents a different and ultimately more satisfying way of thinking about the problem of gender and IT schooling.

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  • Gendering the ICT curriculum: The paradox of choice

    Abbiss, J. (2009)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper looks at the ICT (information and communication technology) curriculum in New Zealand secondary schools and gendered participation patterns in different specialist ICT subjects. New Zealand has a permissive ICT curriculum, comprising a variety of subjects and characterised by choice and variation in the curriculum in practice at the local level. The data that are reported include results of (i) a national questionnaire survey of secondary schools, and (ii) a qualitative case study conducted in a large, coeducational New Zealand secondary school and involving classroom observations and interviews with teachers and students. It is suggested that the permissiveness of the curriculum, which ostensibly caters for the needs of students by providing choices, may, in some circumstances, effectively reinforce gender stereotypes relating to computer interests and practices. This is a paradox of choice. Questions are raised about the nature of the ICT curriculum in New Zealand and how it may contribute to or challenge gender stereotypes, future curriculum developments and, more broadly, how we can account for persistent gendered participation patterns in ICT subjects in schools.

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  • Gender identity and meaning making in specialist IT classes. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Montreal, Canada, April 11-15, 2005

    Abbiss, J. (2005)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    An exploration of how year 12 students in a New Zealand high school make meaning of their experiences of different specialist IT (information technology) courses shows that gender identity is a potent factor in their experiences. At a personal level, individual students, males and females, construe their experiences of CPS (computer studies) and TIM (text and information management) courses differently. However, students tend to think of different computer activities as masculine and feminine practices. They imbue courses with masculine and feminine identities, depending on the type of computer applications, knowledge and skills that are emphasised in the courses. These are socially defined notions of computing activity as gendered practice. Also, students’ experiences are tied up with ideas about what sort of computer practices are consistent with their developing and personal identities as male and female students of IT and computer users. This has implications and raises questions for those who are concerned with a perceived ‘problem’ in the under representation of females in computer science and related courses. It suggests that the ‘problem’ is more complex than it may initially appear.

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  • The "New Zealand Fellowship" in New Zealand: It's Activity and Influence in the 1930s and 1940s

    Abbiss, J. (1998)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper describes the operation of the organisation in New Zealand in an effort to reflect the collective philosophy of a group of educational activists, including politicians, government education officials and academics who helped shape the system of education provision, curriculum and pedagogy. Information is derived largely from archival records at the Institute of Education, London. These archives are not a complete record of the workings of the NEF in New Zealand or internationally. However, they provide a broad ranging record and give interesting insights into the thoughts and motivations of educators who were influential in determining New Zealand's education policy in the 1930s and 1940s. The recent decade has seen considerable debate about the nature and likely impact of recent administrative, curricular and assessment reforms in New Zealand schools (Olssen and Morris Matthews, 1997) In this context of rapid change it may be timely to recall an earlier time of strong public interest and debate about changes in primary and secondary education in New Zealand. During the 1930s and 1940s the principles of education which would dominate curriculum and the system of provision for the next 50 years emerged as dominant forces. It was a time when a particular 'egalitarian' philosophy of public education was established. Today some would consider this philosophy to have been thoroughly compromised by recent developments. Others would consider it to have been rightly superseded. However, what consideration of the NEF in the 1930s and 1940s probably best highlights is a time when educational debate and reform was more democratic and genuinely open to a range of viewpoints than has been our recent experience.

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  • Learning about New Zealand in Antarctica

    Abbiss, J. (2004)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    Antarctica provides an interesting context to connect with aspects of the essential learning about New Zealand, as identified in the social studies national curriculum. (Ministry of Education, 1999, p23) New Zealand has a long history of contact and political interest in Antarctica. In this remote setting, New Zealand plays an important custodial role and participates on the international stage as one of the signatories to the Antarctica treaty system. Every year a number of New Zealanders go to Antarctica as part of science teams, in administrative and support roles at Antarctic bases, as participants in education, media and artists programmes, as eco-tourists, and in search of adventure. Scott Base is a small, and by no means typical, extension of New Zealand. However, here you will find representations of New Zealand’s national identity and heritage on the Ice. This paper draws on literature, interviews conducted with people at Scott Base in October 2002, and the author’s personal experience in Antarctica.

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  • For the love of teaching: Commitment of beginning secondary teachers in Seychelles

    De Comarmond, O.; Abbiss, J.; Lovett, S (2012)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Part of a larger study on commitment of secondary teachers across career stages. Focus on Newly Qualified Teachers, one of the case studies of the main study. Interest in beginning teachers as a concern for both the local context and worldwide.

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  • IT is a gender thing, or is it? Gender, curriculum culture and students' experiences of specialist IT subjects in a New Zealand High School

    Abbiss, J. (2005)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis explores students' experiences of specialist information technology (IT) courses at the secondary school level in New Zealand. It asks whether students experience a gendered curriculum culture in relation to specialist IT subjects. The exploration involves a survey of national curriculum arrangements and detailed consideration of the manner in which the curriculum is implemented in practice by teachers and experienced by students in three case study classes in a conventional high school, Kahikatea High School (KHS). These classes are year 12 computer studies (CPS) and years 12 and 10 text and information management (TIM). Twenty-two students were the focus of detailed observation in the course of a year. It is found that students experience a gendered IT curriculum culture at KHS, which takes form in both gendered subject and classroom cultures. Gendered subject cultures are established in part through national curriculum structures that maintain subjects from historically gendered domains. Conservative local subject arrangements at KHS contribute to a gendered curriculum in practice. The curriculum takes on a gendered character as a function of choice - teachers' choices about subjects they will offer and the way courses are organised and presented, and students' choices about what subjects they will take. Particular subjects and courses are associated with nominally masculine and feminine computer practices and are thereby imbued with masculine and feminine subject identities. There is considerable variation and nuance in the way students experience different IT courses and in the meanings they make of their experiences. In short, individual students experience the same course differently. They are influenced to greater and lesser degrees by a range of factors, including expectations, prior experience, classroom pedagogy, classroom relationships and performance. Also, individual students are negotiating their masculine and feminine identities as students of IT and computer users as they participate in specialist IT courses and in other arenas of their lives. As they negotiate their roles as computer users and students of IT at KHS, males and females are established in relations of power or authority with the technology and with each other - as computer controllers, aspirant controllers and competent users. These relationships have a gendered character that derives from the attribution of the status of controllers to (some) males and the exclusion of females from this group. However, individual males and females aspire to and are attributed the characteristics and status commensurate with a range of user roles. Gender is a factor in individual students' experiences, but in ways that defy stereotyping and that are highly individualised. All this suggests that gender is not essential in the sense that it implies sameness, but also that gender is not passé or inconsequential as a factor in students experiences of specialist IT courses. Gender relations are a fundamental and inescapable feature of students' experiences of the IT curriculum in practice at KHS.

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