2 results for Adair, V.

  • Teenage use of GP care for moderate to severe asthma in Auckland, New Zealand

    Buetow, S.; Richards, D.; Mitchell, E.A.; Gribben, B.; Adair, V.; Coster, G.; Hight, M. (2005)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Objectives. To describe and understand teenagers' frequency of attendance for General Practitioner (GP) care of moderate to severe asthma in the Auckland region. Methods. Ten Auckland schools identified 510 children aged 13-14 years with breathing problems, who were invited to complete a screening questionnaire. 271 children participated, of whom 114 had moderate to severe asthma. Results. 39% of the 114 had made 0-1 GP visit for asthma, and 17% made 5 visits. Low attendees (0-1 visit) were disproportionately New Zealand European. High attendees (?5 visits) tended to be Maori and/or Pacific Islanders. Half of the teenagers attended GP asthma care as often as it wanted, independently of ethnicity; 62% tell their parents when they cannot manage their asthma; and 29% must pay for GP care. Expected attendance was increased for Maori and Pacific students versus others by 77% (p=0002), and by asthma of increased severity (p <0.001). Teenager resistance to accessing GP asthma care reduced expected attendance by 24% (p=0.003). Conclusions. Maori and Pacific peoples have traditionally faced barriers to accessing GP care, but their their more frequent attendance (than New Zealand Europeans) in this case, challenges whether such barriers persist, at least for acute care of moderate to severe asthma.

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  • A health profile of New Zealand youth who attend secondary school

    Watson, P.D.; Clark, T.C.; Denny, S.J.; Fa'alau, F.; Ameratunga, S.N.; Robinson, E.M.; Schaaf, D.; Crengle, S.M.; Sporle, A.A.; Merry, S.N.; Adair, V.; Dixon, R.S. (2003)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Aim To determine the prevalence of selected health behaviours and protective factors in a representative population of New Zealand youth who attend secondary school. Methods The study sample comprised 12 934 Year 9 to 13 youth from 133 randomly selected secondary schools across New Zealand in 2001. A cross-sectional, anonymous, self-report survey was conducted, incorporating 523 questions in a multimedia computer assisted self-interview (M-CASI) format. Results The school response rate was 85.7% and the student response rate was 75.0%, resulting in an overall response rate of 64.3%. The final dataset comprised 9570 students (males 46.2%, females 53.8%) belonging to diverse ethnic groups (Maori 24.7%, NZ European 55.3%, Pacific 8.2%, and Asian 7.2%). Most students (males 94.2%, females 90.3%) rate their health as good or better, and 90% report the presence of a caring adult in their family or at school. More than one quarter of students (males 27.2%, females 27.6%) report riding in a car driven by a potentially intoxicated driver within the last four weeks. Students report high levels of suicidal thoughts (males 16.9%, females 29.2%), suicide attempts (males 4.7%, females 10.6%), and depressive symptoms (males 8.9%, females 18.3%). Conclusions This survey finds that most school students are healthy, but there are areas of serious concern including driving behaviours and mental health. Students report a high prevalence of positive connections with family and school; these connections are known sources of resiliency in the lives of young people. Findings of the current study support the implementation of the New Zealand Government’s newly released youth policies: the Youth Development Strategy Aotearoa and the Youth Health Action Plan.

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