29 results for Adamson, Carole

  • Complexity and context : staff support systems in mental health after critical incidents and traumatic events : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirement for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Social Work, School of Sociology, Social Policy and Social Work, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand

    Adamson, Carole (2005)

    Doctoral thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis presents an ecological exploration of the experiences of mental health workers faced with critical incidents and traumatic events in the course of their work. A qualitative study, it takes the experiences of twenty workers from a range of disciplines and environments, and examines their preparation for exposure to extreme stress, their passage through the incidents that they chose to relate, and the organisational response to the events. The central research question explores the knowledge bases currently utilised within trauma and critical incident response, and the degree to which these provide adequate explanatory, practice and evaluation models for responses to workplace incidents. It is examined through the narratives of the mental health workers, who self-define and explore the nature of their preparation for, and experience of, critical incidents and traumatic events in their workplace. The question is contextualised through a review of the knowledge bases of trauma and extreme stress, and of the mental health environment in which the workers practice. A case study of the workplace support known as debriefing illustrates the tensions between current knowledge bases in the area. Informed by this, the key issues of what did or did not work for the participants are explored. The thesis argues that the paradigm shift signalled by the latest developments within conceptualisations of trauma is not yet complete, and that the ensuing tensions have created debate and confusion in the creation of adequate responses to workplace incidents. Whilst conceptualisations that attempt to address issues of complexity and context are evolving, it is argued that an ecological framework has the potential to both explain and respond to incidents that occur within the mental health environment. The findings of the research raise issues of complexity in the design and implementation of appropriate support systems, and lend a perspective to the critique of debriefing that has been missing from existing debates. Key principles for the development of safe and sound support systems, and their evaluation, are developed.

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  • CSWEANZ : fit & proper survey results

    Hughes, Catherine; Staniforth, Barbara; Adamson, Carole; Hancox, John; McNabb, David (2016-11)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    [2nd slide] Your feedback is important as it will assist us to: 1. Gain a picture of the processes that Schools of Social Work currently use in selection processes and declining applications, as well as ongoing assessment of fit and proper criteria within programmes. 2. Identify the fit and proper issues that emerge for Schools of Social Work. 3. Assist in the preparation of a report for CSWEANZ that will enable Schools to develop a shared understanding of the issues and to participate and contribute to national debate and development. Part ONE of the survey relates to the process of assessing fit and proper criteria on selection of candidates. Part TWO identifies the formal processes your institute engages throughout the four years of social work programme to manage academic performance and disciplinary processes. Part THREE examines the embedded processes of assessment for fit and proper criteria used within the degree.

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  • Disaster-informed curriculum for social work and welfare education: Guest editorial

    Adamson, Carole (2014-12)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Book Review: Environmental Social Work

    Adamson, Carole (2013)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A social work lens for a disaster-informed curriculum

    Adamson, Carole (2014-12-08)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper presents a rationale for the inclusion of disaster knowledge within the social work curriculum and argues for a broad, population-based structuring of knowledge-for disaster within the generic curriculum. An exploration of the social work knowledge base is conducted which argues that the strengths and recovery focus inherent within our research, teaching and practice provides social work with a working mandate for working in disasters. Some key principles for curriculum design are established and a model curriculum is presented.

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  • 'Never trust anybody who says, "I don’t need supervision"': Practitioners’ beliefs about social worker resilience

    Beddoe, L.; Davys, Allyson; Adamson, Carole (2014)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Yin noted the requirement for social workers to provide ‘supportive, empowering and strengths-based (resilience building) services’ and asked ‘when the workers themselves are burning out … do we provide the same for them?’. Many researchers have since explored this question, seeking explanations as to how some social workers survive and thrive and others are lost to the profession. The authors of this small exploratory study were interested in exploring practitioners’ understanding of resilience. A qualitative approach was employed to explore practitioner views about what contributed to their own resilience, augmented by data gathered in interviews with those providing supervision to students. Findings suggest a conceptual framework incorporating three aspects of resilience: core attributes within the individual, the practice context and a series of mediating factors. Participant accounts suggested a multifaceted and dynamically balanced awareness of resilience that highlighted the relational and contextual characteristics of their experience. This article reports one significant theme emerging from the study; namely that supervision and collegial support are recognised as vital in the nurturing of practitioner resilience.

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  • Decolonizing Social Work

    Adamson, Carole (2014)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Kate van Heugten (2014) Human Service Organizations in the Disaster Context. Palgrave MacMillan.

    Adamson, Carole (2015)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Building Resilient Practitioners: Definitions and Practitioner Understandings

    Adamson, Carole; Beddoe, L; Davys, Allyson (2014-04)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper turns the conceptual focus of resilience from that of the service user and community to the experience of social workers themselves. It reports on aspects of an ongoing study into social work practitioner resilience in health care and non-statutory practice settings in New Zealand. This continuing study explores the perceptions of experienced social workers in relation to resilience in the face of workplace demands and stressors. After clarifying common definitional challenges regarding the conceptualisation of resilience in the literature, qualitative data from twenty-one interviews are examined and a conceptual framework is proposed which identifies three components of resilience: core attributes, practice context and mediating factors. The narratives of the participants suggest a multi-faceted and dynamically-balanced awareness of resilience that emphasises the relational and contextual characteristics of their experience.

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  • Reactions to driving cessation: a qualitative study of people with dementia and their families

    Chacko, EE; Wright, WM; Worrall, RC; Adamson, Carole; Cheung, G (2015-10)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    OBJECTIVES: A proportion of older people with mild dementia are safe to drive. However, driving cessation is recommended at some point as the disease progresses. Driving cessation can have significant psychological and social consequences on people with dementia and their carers. This paper aims to explore the psychosocial and adjustment issues following driving cessation for people with dementia and their supporters. METHOD: Participants and their supporters were interviewed within 1 month of driving-cessation advice, and again 6 months later. Issues associated with driving cessation were explored in semi-structured interviews. RESULTS: Seven participants and their supporters were recruited. This has generated a total of 22 transcripts for qualitative analysis including follow-up interviews. For those who could remember the details of driving cessation, most were unhappy with the decision. Carers who were supportive of driving cessation questioned the legality of it. Most participants minimised the impact of their driving cessation on their supporters. Most supporters were negatively affected by the decision. CONCLUSIONS: The preliminary findings highlight the need for a more comprehensive process for driving cessation in those with dementia, with closer links to regulatory bodies, and increased support for their families/carers.

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  • "But what about the theory?" Designing a social work curriculum around practice learning and reflection

    Adamson, Carole; Bellinger, A (2010-06-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Curriculum design in an academic context operates within a site of tension characterised by the need

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  • Complexity and Context: Staff Support Systems in Mental Health after Critical Incidents and Traumatic Events

    Adamson, Carole (2006)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This thesis presents an ecological exploration of the experiences of mental health workers faced with critical incidents and traumatic events in the course of their work. A qualitative study, it takes the experiences of twenty workers from a range of disciplines and environments, and examines their preparation for exposure to extreme stress, their passage through the incidents that they chose to relate, and the organisational response to the events. The central research question explores the knowledge bases currently utilised within trauma and critical incident response, and the degree to which these provide adequate explanatory, practice and evaluation models for responses to workplace incidents. It is examined through the narratives of the mental health workers, who self-define and explore the nature of their preparation for, and experience of, critical incidents and traumatic events in their workplace. The question is contextualised through a review of the knowledge bases of trauma and extreme stress, and of the mental health environment in which the workers practice. A case study of the workplace support known as debriefing illustrates the tensions between current knowledge bases in the area. Informed by this, the key issues of what did or did not work for the participants are explored. The thesis argues that the paradigm shift signalled by the latest developments within conceptualisations of trauma is not yet complete, and that the ensuing tensions have created debate and confusion in the creation of adequate responses to workplace incidents. The findings of the research raise issues of complexity in the design and implementation of appropriate support systems, and lend a perspective to the critique of debriefing that has been missing from existing debates. Key principles for the development of safe and sound support systems, and their evaluation, are developed.

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  • Ageing and mental health in diversity: A New Zealand experience

    Park, H-J; Adamson, Carole (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    As is the case in most developed nations, a significant proportion of New Zealand's older people experience mental health issues in their everyday lives. This chapter aims to provide an outline of 'mental health and older adults' in the New Zealand context. this background snapshot provides a foundation for the New Zealand landscape on this topic. Cultural iniatives and legislative acts are highlighted alongside current programmes in mental health for older people. Challenges around care for older people with mental health issues abound due to wide-ranging complexities surrounding their care and treatment; there is also limited subject-specific research being undetaken. Urgently needed are new approaches to economic planning, health care and welfare support, retirement policies, innovative living space arrangements and inter-generational relations alongside the promotion of contructive views on ageing.

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  • Stress, trauma and critical incidents: the challenge for social work education

    Adamson, Carole (2006)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The article considers implications of research in regard to support systems for workers who have experienced traumatic events and critical incidents. The evidence is aligned with educators’ practice experience that students on placement, new graduates and experienced workers alike, all locate significant stressors and challenges to their resiliency within the systemic and structural organisational contexts of the workplace. This emphasis upon job context as opposed to job content raises key challenges for social work educators. The article addresses issues that arise in the preparation for the management of stress and incidents and considers some tools and models that educators might employ in the pre-practice environment. The article is based upon a presentation given at the Social Work Education symposium in Auckland in January 2006.

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  • Supervision is not politically innocent

    Adamson, Carole (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper argues that the potential tensions within the role, function and purpose of supervision, potentially magnified by the adoption of the process within a variety of organisational and occupational settings, underscore the importance of supervision being seen as a contextually informed activity. Using a lens of resilience theories, some key contextual factors emerge that reinforce supervision as a developmental, relational, constructed and reflective activity, one which must always be mindful of the contexts in which it is practised.

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  • Post-traumatic stress disorder: overview

    Adamson, Carole (2007-09)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The impact of traumatic events and the experience of psychological trauma have been depicted in myth, legend, art and literature throughout human history (for instance [1,2]). They have, for the last generation, been psychiatrically classified as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and as acute stress disorder (ASD). The papers in this In-Depth Review serve both to describe the status of current thinking in regard to the scientific conceptualization of psychological trauma and to raise questions in regard to our understanding of the contextualization of traumatic experience within occupational settings. For many years, occupational medicine and health and safety legislation has focused upon observable injury and illness caused by single events. These articles play a timely role in reminding us that many health and welfare concerns with far-reaching effects within organizational environments may be psychological, social and complex in nature and have enduring effects over a considerable span of time.

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  • Teaching Trauma: Critically Engaging with a Troublesome Term

    Marlowe, Jay; Adamson, Carole (2012)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Getting the balance right: critical reflection, knowledge and the social work curriculum

    Adamson, Carole (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Social work education in Australia and New Zealand is predominantly embedded within tertiary education systems modelled on university pedagogy. Consolidated by the demand for professionalisation, this location has shaped the social work curriculum into traditional, discipline-based academic courses and delivery. Calls for graduates and practitioners to be robust, resilient and critically reflective have come from employers, the social work profession and educators. This paper acknowledges the impact of external stressors on social work and, within the context of debates over the nature of the social work profession, conceptualises these pressures as a demand on the resilience and reflective capacity of practitioners. Identifying core issues of the need for skills in critical reflection, the lens turns to the construction of the social work curriculum itself. Three models of programme design and curriculum delivery are presented and, using a recently implemented example, questions are raised about the potential for structural change to the curriculum that may enable a central focus upon integrative processes and critical reflection.

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  • Teaching trauma: Critically engaging a troublesome term

    Marlowe, Jay; Adamson, Carole (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    How the social work profession supports people to live through experiences of trauma and helps to facilitate recovery represents an important base of our practice. Whilst the impacts of trauma in people's lives cannot be discounted, there remains significant scope to further inquire into how people respond to traumatic situations and locate their own sources of healing, hope and survival. Drawing on two different case studies—one with resettled Sudanese refugees in Australia and another involving critical incident debriefing—this paper looks to address the complex intersections between trauma, well-being and the roles of social work pedagogy and practice.

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  • Educating resilient practitioners

    Beddoe, Elizabeth; Davys, Allyson; Adamson, Carole (2013)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Many social workers face challenges maintaining professional optimism and personal well-being in their chosen career. The retention of capable practitioners is important to employers and the wider profession. This paper reports on elements of an ongoing study into practitioner resilience in social work in health and non-statutory practice settings. The project aims to explore experienced social workers' understanding of their resilience in the face of workplace demands and stressors. Findings from a small, qualitative study of experienced practitioners in New Zealand suggest that social work education contributes in multi-faceted ways to preparing resilient practitioners. The authors recommend the strengthening of these elements in pre-service education.

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