3 results for Addison, David J.

  • Archaeology of Atafu, Tokelau: Some initial results from 2008

    Addison, David J.; Bass, Bryon; Christensen, Carl; Kalolo, John; Lundblad, Steve; Mills, Peter; Petchey, Fiona; Thompson, Adam (2009)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Surface survey, shovel testing, and stratigraphic excavations were done on Atafu Atoll in Tokelau during August 2008. Initial results suggest that Fale Islet has the most potential for further archaeological research. Dense cultural deposits on this islet are >1 m (39 in.) deep. Cultural material recovered includes food bone, fire-affected volcanic rock, tool-grade basalt flakes and tool fragments, Tridacna shell adzes, and pearl-shell fishhook fragments. Dog bone occurs from the earliest deposits through to the late prehistoric, while pig bone is found only in historic contexts. Fish bone is common throughout, and, with the exception of Tridacna, there are few edible mollusk remains. Initial EDXRF (Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence) analyses have found the basalt to be consistent with documented sources on Tutuila, Samoa. Basal radiocarbon dates from two excavation units are 660-540 cal. BP and 500-310 cal. BP (at 2σ).

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  • Re-interpreting old dates: Radiocarbon determinations from the Tokelau Islands (South Pacific)

    Petchey, Fiona; Addison, David J.; McAlister, Andrew (2010)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    A re-evaluation of available archaeological radiocarbon dates from the Tokelau Islands in West Polynesia demonstrates that careful assessment is essential when developing chronologies from previously published radiocarbon data. The new calibration results point to concurrent and continual human occupation of Fakaofo and Atafu from at least 750-550 years ago up until European contact in AD 1765.

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  • Stability in the South Pacific surface marine ¹⁴C reservoir over the last 750 years. Evidence from American Samoa, the southern Cook Islands and the Marquesas

    Petchey, Fiona; Allen, Melinda S.; Addison, David J.; Anderson, Atholl (2009)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Although minor climatic and sea-level changes have been documented for the South Pacific during the late Holocene, our understanding of the consequent impact of these changes on the marine ¹⁴C reservoir, and therefore the ¹⁴C content of shellfish, is limited. Ultimately, this has implications for documenting the chronology of human movement and adaptation in this region. In this paper we compare marine reservoir (ΔR) data obtained from tightly controlled archaeological proveniences with known-age, pre-AD 1950 shells from the southern Cook Islands, American Samoa, and Marquesas Islands. Results indicate that there has been no significant change in the near-shore marine reservoir in these three locations over the last ca. 750 years. Furthermore, known-age, pre-AD 1950 shell samples provide more precise ΔR values for use in sample calibration than archaeological paired shell/charcoal samples. This is attributed in part to the limitations of assigning provenance and age to material from archaeological sites. On the basis of these results we conclude that the known-age, pre-AD 1950 shell derived ΔR values can be used to calibrate shell ¹⁴C results from deposits of late Holocene age.

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